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03/02/2011 01:10:38 PM · #1
I'm really surprised to see that there hasn't been a challenge to date on infrared photography. I understand this is not a style of photography that appeals to all, but I'm a big fan of it.

Was hoping folks could post some of their infrared images here for all to look at and give some info on whether it was an IR filter or an IR-modded camera. If using filters, what filter is being used and also why that particular wavelength was chosen. Right now, I cant tell what different using a 720nm or a 1100nm would make, so seeing these filters in action would be great!

Message edited by author 2011-03-02 13:16:10.
03/02/2011 01:25:48 PM · #2
Wow, just googled this, I am LOVING these photos. Would love to learn more about this.

I'm at work and can't read up much on it now, but do you need a special lens or something for this??
03/02/2011 01:42:46 PM · #3
You need either a special filter or an adapted camera. It can get quite tricky with filters if you don't have live view because visible light doesn't get through the filters.
03/02/2011 01:49:15 PM · #4
21.gif ambaker does plenty of IR.

Infrared Gallery

03/02/2011 01:55:55 PM · #5
IR is a lovely area of photography... the predominance of DSLRs has somewhat stifled it temporarily, because nearly all off-the-shelf DSLRs have very strong IR blocking filters over the sensors. This means very long exposures for IR, or modifying the camera. Lots of folks are now taking older cameras and modifying for IR, with great results. There are several companies that will do conversions.
It's a shame that manufacturers don't offer IR versions of some models. Canon did once with the 20Da, but that was available for only a short time, and you hardly ever see them on the used market.
03/02/2011 02:07:07 PM · #6
Originally posted by GinaRothfels:

You need either a special filter or an adapted camera. It can get quite tricky with filters if you don't have live view because visible light doesn't get through the filters.


Even with the adapted camera you still need the filters. But the exposure times get shorter. As Kirbic pointed out, modern dSLRs have IR-blocking filters over the sensors, so much less IR radiation gets through. The IR filters you put in front of the lens let mostly only the IR wavelength of light through, so if the camera hasn't been modified (by removing the IR filtration in front of the sensor) the exposures get silly-long. Basically, not hand-holdable even in broad daylight.

R.
03/02/2011 02:16:13 PM · #7
Just some of my favorites:

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_872152.jpg by 21.gif Dudski
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_889859.jpg also by 21.gif Dudski
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_893891.jpg by 21.gif Ambaker
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_880288.jpg by 31.gif dainmcgowan
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_873386.jpg by 21.gif Marbo
03/02/2011 02:30:37 PM · #8
I`ve dabbled a bit with ir. Forget canon if you want to do unmodded infrared, they suck :)
I guess there`s never been an infrared challenge because you need a special filter. And the know what happens here if a challenge comes up that not everyone can enter.

Nikon D50/D70 or even D40 are all great for infrared with a hoya r72 ir filter.
These cameras have very weak ir blocking filters so exposures of well under a second are easy. No live view needed just compose before adding the filter and the auto focus still works most the time.
Some of my favs

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_635508.jpg Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_514948.jpg Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_361974.jpg Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_687471.jpg
03/02/2011 02:33:57 PM · #9
Originally posted by marbo:

I`ve dabbled a bit with ir. Forget canon if you want to do unmodded infrared, they suck :)
I guess there`s never been an infrared challenge because you need a special filter. And the know what happens here if a challenge comes up that not everyone can enter.

Nikon D50/D70 or even D40 are all great for infrared with a hoya r72 ir filter.
These cameras have very weak ir blocking filters so exposures of well under a second are easy. No live view needed just compose before adding the filter and the auto focus still works most the time.

Thanks for joining the discussion, Mark. A question regarding Canons. I was planning on getting a Hoya R72 for my canon T2i/550D. I understand they have pretty aggressive IR blocking. Is it impossible to use these cameras unmodded, or would they be fine with just longer exposure times? My main interest would be landscapes, so longer exposures dont really matter. I'm not interested in hand-holding or short exposures.
03/02/2011 03:04:18 PM · #10
It's still very possible with a canon but yes much longer exposure times. Great for water but not trees on a windy day.
Don't let me put you off, my 1st ir shot was on a canon 300d.
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_119061.jpg
8s at f9,200iso. Things have moved on, you could go 800iso nowadays but I don,t know how strong your blocking filter is.
White balance is also a problem with canons. With a nikon d50/70 you could do a custom setting in camera.
You will have to shoot raw and tweak for colour ir photos.
03/02/2011 03:45:16 PM · #11
Originally posted by marbo:

It's still very possible with a canon but yes much longer exposure times. . Things have moved on, you could go 800iso nowadays but I don,t know how strong your blocking filter is.
White balance is also a problem with canons. With a nikon d50/70 you could do a custom setting in camera.
You will have to shoot raw and tweak for colour ir photos.

What kind of exposure times are we talking? 1-10seconds or 30-60+ second range? I know I can do custom white balances in camera on my T2i, so hopefully that should work. Post-processing would be Lightroom 3 and conversion to B&W or false color.
03/02/2011 03:46:20 PM · #12
You can also get infrared effect in software. These are three of my examples (not very good, I know):
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_934767.jpg . Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_923575.jpg . Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_924307.jpg
They make green white and darken blue. I used a preset in Lightroom that does that.
03/02/2011 03:49:58 PM · #13
Margaret, which presets are you using? I know LR3 has a couple presets, and I've downloaded a few, but don't feel the presets get the same tonal intensity as true IR. In true IR I feel the blacks are pitch black and the whites are crisp and bright as anything. I have yet to find a preset that can mimic those.
03/02/2011 03:54:48 PM · #14
Originally posted by gcoulson:

Margaret, which presets are you using?
Unfortunately I don't have it here. I will let you know when I am back home.
03/02/2011 04:05:09 PM · #15
Originally posted by gcoulson:

Originally posted by marbo:

It's still very possible with a canon but yes much longer exposure times. . Things have moved on, you could go 800iso nowadays but I don,t know how strong your blocking filter is.
White balance is also a problem with canons. With a nikon d50/70 you could do a custom setting in camera.
You will have to shoot raw and tweak for colour ir photos.

What kind of exposure times are we talking? 1-10seconds or 30-60+ second range? I know I can do custom white balances in camera on my T2i, so hopefully that should work. Post-processing would be Lightroom 3 and conversion to B&W or false color.


I`m not sure, at a guess 5-10s. Maybe there`s someone here thats tried with a T2i. I`m sure the custom white balance won`t work once the ir filter is on.
03/02/2011 04:09:53 PM · #16
Originally posted by gcoulson:

Margaret, which presets are you using? I know LR3 has a couple presets, and I've downloaded a few, but don't feel the presets get the same tonal intensity as true IR. In true IR I feel the blacks are pitch black and the whites are crisp and bright as anything. I have yet to find a preset that can mimic those.

Try using "high-radius Unsharp Mask" to pump up the contrast, maybe in addition to an "S"-shaped tone Curve. For a DPC-sized image, try these USM settings (you can also apply more than once):

Amount: 15%
Radius: 60 pixels
Threshold: 0

This USM technique also works well on regular, color landscapes, but watch out for highlight areas blowing out too much, and for excessive blocking in the shadows. You can adjust the first two settings to control these effects, but as I understand it the threshold should always be zero.
03/02/2011 04:46:08 PM · #17
Thanks for the info GeneralE...unfortunately I'm working solely in Lightroom 3, so no USM to play with.
03/02/2011 04:50:20 PM · #18
Originally posted by gcoulson:

Thanks for the info GeneralE...unfortunately I'm working solely in Lightroom 3, so no USM to play with.


It's true that sharpening in Lr can't be used for that effect (can't set radius high enough), however, you have another tool that is meant for the purpose, namely the clarity slider.
03/02/2011 04:54:20 PM · #19
Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by gcoulson:

Thanks for the info GeneralE...unfortunately I'm working solely in Lightroom 3, so no USM to play with.


It's true that sharpening in Lr can't be used for that effect (can't set radius high enough), however, you have another tool that is meant for the purpose, namely the clarity slider.

Indeed. The Clarity slider is probably the most used slider in my PP flow...often injudiciously so!!
03/03/2011 02:12:25 AM · #20
Thought I would add a few things to consider here...
I have taken a few IR shots with my Canon 450D XSi. It has a very strong IR filter on the sensor and thus requires an exposure of around 15-30 secs depending on ISO used and available light. I use a Hoya R72 IR filter on my 18-55 kit lens.
This brings me to an important point - the lens. Some lenses are better than others for a long exposure for IR. The 18-55 I use is not good but the 55-250 I have is f***ing terrible! Some lenses cause "hot spots" where the IR is reflected off the sensor then around the lens and makes a brighter spot in the middle of the shot.
Check out this page, it might help you. http://dpanswers.com/content/irphoto_lenses.php.
There is plenty IR info out there on the web and also tips on how to edit. Enjoyit - it certainly is a different type of look when you get it right.

Message edited by author 2011-03-03 02:31:39.
03/03/2011 06:04:17 AM · #21
Also, awesome tutorial by Judi:

http://www.dpchallenge.com/tutorial.php?TUTORIAL_ID=56

Message edited by author 2011-03-03 06:04:39.
03/03/2011 07:35:40 AM · #22
Originally posted by Silent-Shooter:

Thought I would add a few things to consider here...
I have taken a few IR shots with my Canon 450D XSi. It has a very strong IR filter on the sensor and thus requires an exposure of around 15-30 secs depending on ISO used and available light. I use a Hoya R72 IR filter on my 18-55 kit lens.

Is there away to estimate how many stops of light reduction there is with the filter to guess how long exposures you need, or is it all trial and error?
03/03/2011 08:25:31 AM · #23
Originally posted by gcoulson:

Originally posted by Silent-Shooter:

Thought I would add a few things to consider here...
I have taken a few IR shots with my Canon 450D XSi. It has a very strong IR filter on the sensor and thus requires an exposure of around 15-30 secs depending on ISO used and available light. I use a Hoya R72 IR filter on my 18-55 kit lens.

Is there away to estimate how many stops of light reduction there is with the filter to guess how long exposures you need, or is it all trial and error?

Mostly trial and error... your in camera meter doesnt really work off IR light
03/03/2011 08:31:03 AM · #24
Guess I'm just going to have to pick up the R72 and give it a bash!
03/03/2011 09:26:24 AM · #25
My Canon 30D was modified by LifePixel to photograph IR. It has their standard conversion which blocks most visible light, and lets all the IR in. Focusing works well with most lenses, and all my IR shots have been hand held.

I also have used a Sony F717. There I use an visible light bocking filter, and the night shot mode. The downside to this combo is that Sony has rigged the night shot mode to go with a slow shutter, and wide aperature. So you need a 720 nm filter or above, or a strong ND filter to reduce the visible light. The upside on the Sonys are that they have electronic viewfinder. (Live View) so there is no problem with focusing on an unconverted camera.

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_772667.jpg
Sony F717 nightshot mode with 720 nm filter
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_935497.jpg
Canon 30D Modified for IR, no external filters
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