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DPChallenge Forums >> Business of Photography >> Making My Own Greeting Cards etc
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01/03/2012 03:26:33 PM · #1
Ok, so I want to make my own greeting cards to sell at various boutiques and on my website and give as gifts to friends and family.

Here are a few questions:

Is it better to have the cards printed by a company (such as Moo.com) or buy blank cards and glue the pictures on?

If I have the cards printed, what are some recommendations for printing companies?

If I buy blank cards to glue my own prints on, what are some recommendations for online paper companies and what weight paper am I looking for?

Thank you for any helpful advice.

ETA: I am a smugmug pro member if that matters.

Message edited by author 2012-01-03 15:28:57.
01/03/2012 03:35:33 PM · #2
photographersedge.com has some cards that the pictures "glue" in, but it looks more like a mat and card combined.

That's a really bad description. :(

Photographer's Edge
01/03/2012 04:06:58 PM · #3
Originally posted by karmat:

photographersedge.com has some cards that the pictures "glue" in, but it looks more like a mat and card combined.

I was going to suggest about the same, though the cards I like just have a "pocket" into which you slip the print, and a nice mat with a precut window through which it shows. It's only a problem if you can't crop or border your pictures to fit the mat opening. You can also use these as "instant mats" if you want to frame a small print.

Here is a more targeted link for the ones I'd be most likely to buy -- they are a 5x7 card which take a 4x6 print with a smaller opening (see links for specifics on different cards):

Cards for 4x6 prints
01/03/2012 04:24:12 PM · #4
Hmmmmm....

By the time I buy the blank cards and have the pictures printed, I am paying the same amount for a printed greeting card by a professional printing company.

Also, General, are you saying that those cards you linked to have a pocket to slip the picture into? So no gluing involved?
01/03/2012 04:24:33 PM · #5
One issue with having cards printed by another company is the cost. I've looked into this a bit and SnapFish, for example, has blank cards at about $1.00 a card. If you are selling them you will get no more than 50% from a botique. You have the added cost of the envelope and any packaging you want. Selling them for $5/card which is expensive for a card, you'll see roughly $1 in profit.

On the other hand, if you really want them just to give to people and use yourself then go with a print service. I print my photos on cards at SnapFish as thank yous for local doctors and currently have 38 diffferent cards.
01/03/2012 04:28:05 PM · #6
Originally posted by DrAchoo:

Selling them for $5/card which is expensive for a card, you'll see roughly $1 in profit.


Yeah, I thought of that too. But actually $5.00/card is not expensive. It's about the going rate around here. That's why I DONT buy cards :-)

ETA: I kinda of have an "in" where I am. I work at a school and there are always opportunities to sell crap at auctions, boutiques, special events.

Message edited by author 2012-01-03 16:30:17.
01/03/2012 04:37:55 PM · #7
Originally posted by slickchik:

Also, General, are you saying that those cards you linked to have a pocket to slip the picture into? So no gluing involved?

The person there said these use a two-sided tape, though I wasn't sure if that affixes the photo directly or secures a third flap inside. These folks have a toll-free phone number, so you can go ahead and ask them for all the details....

I have seen/heard of some similar cards which have just a slip-in pocket for the photo, but I can't remember the vendor now -- it was a long time ago. However, a professionally-matted print will be taped-down as well, so it doesn't sound that odd to me.

If you buy these in a batch of fifty or so, they will cost about $1.30/ea including shipping (note these particular cards include envelopes) ... a 4x6 print should cost under fifty cents, so your finished matted print is under two bucks..

I personally prefer making prints on actual photo printers rather than by any inkjet or offset process.
01/03/2012 08:47:16 PM · #8
i'm not sure where these guys are price-wise, but i've been really happy with their quality. i also like that i can custom print on all four sides of a card. my clients have liked them, as well. cardsdirect.com
11/25/2014 02:26:18 AM · #9
As I think that publishing and printing the cards is very time consuming task. It may be possible that you will not get the card published as you require. In these days of marriages the printing companies will not get time to publish a single card for you only. I refer you to just download the greeting card app and get the card as required by you. greeting-cards-app(.)com
11/25/2014 05:55:45 AM · #10
I use a printing company to print my cards and the larger the quantity the smaller the per card price. They even offer a print run of one card to let me check I am happy with the printing. Unfortunately the company I use is in the UK but I imagine there will be companies like this everywhere. I would not even consider printing the cards myself as the ink would cost me a lot more and I could not match the quality of the card printing company.

If I order a quantity of 25 cards I get the cards for £0.80 each and if I order 50 cards the price comes down to £0.50 per card so plenty of opportunity to make a bit of mark up.

The biggest problem I have found with selling cards through local shops is that the shops generally like the cards sale or return so it is a huge admin job keeping track of cards in lots of different retail outlets. You need to sell a lot of cards to make decent money to offset the amount of admin involved. It would be a lot simpler if the shops just bought the cards outright from me up front but they don't want the risk of not selling them. It is fun having my cards in lots of shops even if not that sensible from a business perspective.

11/25/2014 07:44:01 AM · #11
I was surprised at the cost for printing cards. I wanted to do this, as well, but it's soooo expensive!!
11/25/2014 09:52:09 AM · #12
Over the last couple of years, the price for cards has doubled. I let out a little gasp when I realized what my Christmas cards were going to cost this year.

11/25/2014 01:50:02 PM · #13
I guess most people in this thread want to include glossies in their greeting cards.
But if you want to go a different way, here's what I've been doing for many years now.

I've been making my own greeting cards for years.

They really are ephemera, and I have found most folks are just interested in the message.

I purchase good paper and good envelopes. I go to a store where they specialize only in paper,
it's easy to get a good quality product for a fairly low price by purchasing in quantity.

Also, because holiday cards are not designed to be archival, I don't mind printing my design/image
directly on the card. With the right stock this can make a very nice presentation.

This is what is in my paper closet right now (left over) and I'll use it again this year:

The brand is Classic Crest, made by Neenah Paper.

one ream of 80 lb, 'smooth' white 8 1/2 x 11 paper. (I slice the paper in half)
one box (250) # A-2 envelopes.

I don't exactly remember the price, but probably for the ream of paper and the envelopes,
it was around $50--$75. (the envelopes are the most expensive)

Obviously, different sizes of paper and envelopes are available.

Here's where I source my stuff :

Kelly Paper Co
JC Paper Co
11/25/2014 09:01:20 PM · #14
I probably should have mentioned that if you are showcasing your work
when you send greeting cards, the extra cost of matted cards and nice
images from a printing house are usually "business expenses" on your
1040.
02/23/2015 11:57:54 PM · #15
The best greeting card software is simple and fun to use. You can design and print business cards online, labels, greeting cards and more. The program comes with a lot of card templates, clip art, background pictures and drawing tools. For more information visit our site productdesignertool.com.

Message edited by author 2015-02-24 00:00:36.
04/01/2015 02:50:35 AM · #16
Hello,
I think in today's environment, there is no benefit of printing greeting cards because they does not long lasting. Even though they can be miss placed. On the other hand, e-greeting card are long lasting.
I recommend you to use e-greeting card which is a best option for you.
04/01/2015 03:12:04 AM · #17
Originally posted by erikcoonor:

Hello,
I think in today's environment, there is no benefit of printing greeting cards because they does not long lasting. Even though they can be miss placed. On the other hand, e-greeting card are long lasting.
I recommend you to use e-greeting card which is a best option for you.


Wow is this even allowed!! Free advertising lol!

I much prefer a paper card any day, they take time and effort ;--)

Message edited by author 2015-04-01 03:31:40.
04/01/2015 08:24:08 AM · #18
Originally posted by Neat:

Originally posted by erikcoonor:

Hello,
I think in today's environment, there is no benefit of printing greeting cards because they does not long lasting. Even though they can be miss placed. On the other hand, e-greeting card are long lasting.
I recommend you to use e-greeting card which is a best option for you.


Wow is this even allowed!! Free advertising lol!

I much prefer a paper card any day, they take time and effort ;--)


Agreed!

Last night I was doing my bookshelf cleanup and happen to come across some old greeting cards and as soon as I saw those, a tini-tiny smile came on face!

That is the beauty of the paper cards.
04/01/2015 08:27:39 AM · #19
One of my friends does this for petty cash, it has turned into a hobby job and it has paid for her photography equipment, she just purchased a full frame camera. She sells them at farmers markets, flea markets and does fundraisers with her prints. She will make 3x5 and 4x6. She does not use the cheap printers though and has invested in the expensive professional printers and she will matt them herself. The most expense is the paper and ink, but she does not go cheap on that either. She just started doing her own canvas and larger prints and even calendars.

05/15/2015 02:41:21 AM · #20
It would be better if you could buy blank cards and convert them into greeting cards. You can use some hard tinted paper to create decorative ideas for your cards.

Message edited by author 2015-05-15 02:42:05.
05/17/2015 01:15:44 AM · #21
I don't make cards for sale, but for my personal use, I've been going out to Michael's and buying their bulk blank greeting cards. I think I get 50 for around $5.00. I made a template in Photoshop and just drop my picture into the template. I even got fancy and used the text function to put my name and the name of the picture on the back of the card. The paper gives a matte finish and I've never had any problem with bleeding. The envelopes aren't the greatest, but they are acceptable.
05/17/2015 08:35:45 PM · #22
Hey, 21_F.gif Germaine, nice to hear from you!! I had cards made by Shutterfly once upon a time, but may try the Michaels cards, too. My printer is getting a bit long in the tooth, but still does OK for most things.

How are you??
10/20/2015 03:23:46 AM · #23
Originally posted by slickchik:

Ok, so I want to make my own greeting cards to sell at various boutiques and on my website and give as gifts to friends and family.

Here are a few questions:

Is it better to have the cards printed by a company (such as Moo.com) or buy blank cards and glue the pictures on?

If I have the cards printed, what are some recommendations for printing companies?

If I buy blank cards to glue my own prints on, what are some recommendations for online paper companies and what weight paper am I looking for?

Thank you for any helpful advice.

ETA: I am a smugmug pro member if that matters.


If you want to make your own greeting cards for the boutiques, it would be better to have printed cards of different designs or you can search in google images.

Message edited by author 2015-10-20 03:29:03.
10/20/2015 03:37:23 PM · #24
I print my own cards, as well as my mother's - who is a locally very well-known watercolor artist. I use either Epson double-sided Matte paper, or more recently, Staples 110lb. card stock, on my Epson R2400. Two cards, printed both sides, per 8 1/2" x 11" sheet.

If you use the proper printer profiles and have a well-calibrated setup the results can be excellent.

02/26/2016 04:41:48 AM · #25
You can have a try amolink greeting card maker.
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