DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Toy joy and mirrorless consideration
Pages:  
Showing posts 1 - 7 of 7, (reverse)
AuthorThread
10/15/2015 03:57:22 PM · #1
I just have to share it where someone will understand my joy! Our neighbour and friend just knocked on our door and deposited a bag full of shiny toys for me... he works with recycling and a man came up wondering what to do with some old photography gear. Our friend said he knew someone who *might* appreciate it. :)

(Yes, I squealed and bounced when I opened the bag. I admit it.)

So now I'm sitting with a whole bunch of old manual focus Konica AR lenses, both zooms and primes, that I want to play with! I did a quick search for adapters, and seems like my new toys won't work on my Nikon (wrong flange to something-or-another distance) but will work well on a mirrorless body. As I've already been leaning towards mirrorless for 'luggability', it seems it's about time for serious thought.

Any ideas on what path to take? I saw someone mentioning Focus Peaking being immensely helpful when using old manual lenses, is that correct? I'm also hoping I will be able to use some of my old lenses as well, with adapter of course.
10/15/2015 04:14:15 PM · #2
A used Sony A7 would do you well and the prices have come down quite a bit as newer models come out. The original A7 is still an amazing camera - particulalrly for manual focus. Focus peaking can be very handy although i tend to find the ability to zoom in and adjust focus even handier. Top of the range adapters - Metabones etc - can be quite pricey but i'm always found the cheapo ones from Ebay or Amazon to be good enough. It's good to pick up lens hoods for a lot of these older manual lenses as well as it can make quite a big difference compared to most modern, flare resistant lenses.

Message edited by author 2015-10-15 16:16:18.
10/15/2015 04:32:56 PM · #3
What roooum said. For manual lenses, the higher end adapters don't really bring much to the party over the less expensive ones; you're not worried about an electronic interface, after all. I think the Sony cameras are a great place to look; Sony's sensors are top notch.
10/15/2015 04:42:12 PM · #4
What they both said. Sony a7 is a great camera for the purpose, or the a7II if you want to go new (5-axis image stabilization built in). And ditto for the adapters; at first I had a metabones ($440 or so) so I could use all my Canon glass but that sort of defeated the purpose of the thing (light & compact went out the window) so we sold the Canon gear and now I have a much less expensive adapter so I can use the Lensbaby...

It's a great direction to go, the camera has an awesome full-frame sensor.
10/15/2015 05:11:17 PM · #5
Thanks for the advice! I've been eyeing Sony full-frame. Not many available used in Sweden right now it seems, but I'll keep my eyes open for one. The image stabilization on the A7II would indeed be awesome, but yikes... pricey!(Not terribly so for a full-frame, I know... but for a student.)

Oh, and said toys:

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1168087.jpg

Huh. Apparently they liked the Siggy so much they had to have two?

Message edited by author 2015-10-15 17:11:58.
10/15/2015 06:15:55 PM · #6
I have to recommend Olympus and in particular the OMD line, either 1, 5, or 10. I switched a few years ago and could not be happier with the decision. The EM-10 and EM-5 both have mk 2 versions out and you can still find some good deals on new mk 1 versions. The EM-1 has some awesome new abilities coming to it in November and suspect a mk 2 version is at least a year away. The ability (there are several but this is the one I am looking for) that they are adding to the EM-5 mk2 and EM-1 (the EM-10 mk2 already has this ability) is focus bracketing which is going to make focus stacking a lot easier (it will do up to 999 shots). But, only the EM-1 is getting the ability to do in camera focus stacking with up to I think 6 or 8 images.
10/15/2015 09:49:31 PM · #7
I honestly think you should sell these Konica and Sigma lenses for what you could get and apply the money to other kinds of acquisitions of your choosing. These lenses are slow (except for the f1.7) and probably not worth the hassle of using them even with cheap adapters. If you're going to go mirrorless apply that money to a new camera and native lens(es)that will give you autofocus and better optical performance and will be lighter and less bulky. Besides, you have a ton of lenses now for your Nikon.

Message edited by author 2015-10-15 21:50:40.
Pages:  
Current Server Time: 05/22/2018 12:04:18 PM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2018 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 05/22/2018 12:04:18 PM EDT.