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DPChallenge Forums >> Individual Photograph Discussion >> Seriously?? Why did they photoshop this?
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10/23/2015 11:39:54 AM · #1
So I'm reading CNN, and came across this link to a instagram post:

Zendaya "schocked" to find herself photoshopped

The original is on the right.

SERIOUSLY??? Who are they trying to impress? Has the country really gone crazy? Do we want women to look like 14 year old girls? The woman on the right is curvy and gorgeous. The one on the left is kind of sick looking!
10/23/2015 12:02:08 PM · #2
I like the trend against this type of editing. In this case, the image actaully looks worse after the distortion, so I think most people will be on-board with the un-do. GOod to see more-and more celebs calling this out.
10/23/2015 12:07:04 PM · #3
People feel the need to fix that?!

Dang! I can't imagine how they'd fix me. Ha!
10/23/2015 12:22:49 PM · #4
Whomever did that Ps job oughta be taken behind the woodshed. It's an abomination. Not only does the original not need any of this type of thing, but the edited image is so far from a natural human anatomy it isn't funny. It completely destroys the femininity of her hips. Ugh.
10/23/2015 12:32:10 PM · #5
I wish my unedited was that good.
10/23/2015 05:36:03 PM · #6
Crazy stoopid pp....and the pp'er missed to tan-match a whole damn leg. So this mildly curvy girl has hips. Celebrate them instead of turning her into a 2x4 plank.
10/23/2015 08:29:41 PM · #7
so, are we mad that a woman's body is not acceptable as it is, or are we mad at bad photoshopping?
10/23/2015 09:05:54 PM · #8
Originally posted by posthumous:

so, are we mad that a woman's body is not acceptable as it is, or are we mad at bad photoshopping?


Mad that some idiot thought that it needed photoshopping. I bet if you asked 100 people at least 99 would say that her body is more than good enough.
10/23/2015 09:10:44 PM · #9
It was a bad photoshop job, but it seems disingenuous that anyone claims 'shock' at being photoshopped in a magazine these days. Yes, it was over the top, but let's get over it, it happens on almost every picture we see while waiting in the checkout line. For the record, I would have voted to keep the curves, but I think the coloring was an improvement over the original.
10/23/2015 10:02:26 PM · #10
The editor apologized profusely and promised to pull the magazine (which has not hit the shelves yet) and replace the shopped photo in question with unedited one. ...What a clever way to draw attention to this obscure fashion magazine :)
10/24/2015 08:41:09 AM · #11
Originally posted by posthumous:

so, are we mad that a woman's body is not acceptable as it is, or are we mad at bad photoshopping?


Pick which ever you fancy, its just a reason for a good ole moan.

It's an age thing.

Message edited by author 2015-10-24 08:43:08.
10/24/2015 07:35:43 PM · #12
FWIW I don't mind the ps'd tan, it was the removal of any sign of natural curves in her hips and thighs that I object to. As Wendy already noted, 99/100 people would consider her body to be more than good enough in the unretouched version.

It's bad enough that even mags like Teen People feels the need to skin-smooth young celebs these days; I often saw a pimply David Cassidy and his ilk on the covers of Tiger Beat and Seventeen magazines. Never hurt his popularity, from what I could tell.

Downright atrocious when the fashion mags do things like 'shop Kate Winslet's head onto the body of a model much leaner than her own figure. Glad she raised a stink about it.

ETA: I've been binge-watching Glee (LOVE Sue Sylvester, hehe) and during Season 4 a new character, a very skinny girl, is tricked by a rival into being bulimic. Can't help but wonder how often that happens in real life?

Message edited by author 2015-10-24 19:41:34.
10/25/2015 03:17:58 PM · #13
Originally posted by kirbic:

...It completely destroys the femininity of her hips. Ugh.


THANK YOU, Kirbic! :D
10/25/2015 04:41:12 PM · #14
I liquefy professional models from time to time. You folks have voted on them.

Normally, it's about restoring shape where a strange pose or perspective effects have distorted the model's shape.

In the example given, I wouldn't have touched the hips but for sure I'd have at the bulging jacket above the belt and taken that in a bit.

Sure - there's bad (gratuitous) photoshop, but often you're reshaping a part of the model that really doesn't look that way when you are in the same room.

Let's not extrapolate from this poorly made image into some fantasy that reshaping images (not models) is not sometimes a path to the best result. We'll be calling for people to not correct for perspectives when shooting architecture next...
10/25/2015 06:02:45 PM · #15
+1 on the above-the-belt bulge as it does no favours to the clothing or the model. However, I have no problem at all with what she already has going on below the belt, which is where the worst sins took place. And how much perspective distortion is taking place? Maybe a tiny bit cause she's being shot from a fairly low pov, but it's hardly enough to make her thighs look huge and her head tiny.
10/26/2015 02:20:49 AM · #16
I agree, but there seems to be a bit of a 'thou shalt not liquefy model images' commandment developing.

This sort of photography is still about getting the best image - tweaking a body part doesn't automatically equate to participation in a conspiracy to seek to give young women eating disorders.

As models strike certain poses or try to squeeze into spaces they can compress/distort parts of themselves - especially if they are using the Z axis. We as photographers know they don't actually look like that and need to make some reparations. Certainly the models I have worked with would expect me to either only use images that haven't distorted them unduly or for me to do the necessary tweaks in post.

10/26/2015 05:32:57 PM · #17
Originally posted by Paul:

I agree, but there seems to be a bit of a 'thou shalt not liquefy model images' commandment developing.

This sort of photography is still about getting the best image - tweaking a body part doesn't automatically equate to participation in a conspiracy to seek to give young women eating disorders.

As models strike certain poses or try to squeeze into spaces they can compress/distort parts of themselves - especially if they are using the Z axis. We as photographers know they don't actually look like that and need to make some reparations. Certainly the models I have worked with would expect me to either only use images that haven't distorted them unduly or for me to do the necessary tweaks in post.


Surely this is more about the rampant photoshop thinning of women celebrities and models than the sort of corrections you describe.
10/26/2015 05:34:23 PM · #18
Originally posted by posthumous:

Originally posted by Paul:

I agree, but there seems to be a bit of a 'thou shalt not liquefy model images' commandment developing.

This sort of photography is still about getting the best image - tweaking a body part doesn't automatically equate to participation in a conspiracy to seek to give young women eating disorders.

As models strike certain poses or try to squeeze into spaces they can compress/distort parts of themselves - especially if they are using the Z axis. We as photographers know they don't actually look like that and need to make some reparations. Certainly the models I have worked with would expect me to either only use images that haven't distorted them unduly or for me to do the necessary tweaks in post.


Surely this is more about the rampant photoshop thinning of women celebrities and models than the sort of corrections you describe.


Yes!
10/27/2015 02:36:23 AM · #19
You're right. I've extrapolated into something different.

I suppose I feel that sometimes (including in wider society) there is a sense communicated of some expectation that it is 'just wrong' to manipulate the shape of a model in an image. There often seems to be the assumption that the unedited photo is necessarily a true representation of the model and in some way represents a truth that gets distorted through an edit.

There is seldom any real critique of the original image in terms of the model's shape. It gets discussed in terms of {before} 'she actually looks like this' but {after} 'the photographer made her look like this', when actually the original (for the reasons I wrote before) isn't a great representation of how the model is.
11/10/2015 04:35:58 AM · #20
Just want to say one thing, too much Photoshop just ruin the natural look of any Photo. People need to understand it very well.
11/10/2015 07:30:29 AM · #21
Originally posted by shumicpi:

Just want to say one thing, too much Photoshop just ruin the natural look of any Photo. People need to understand it very well.


A huge +1 from me.
11/10/2015 08:07:49 AM · #22
Originally posted by snaffles:

Originally posted by shumicpi:

Just want to say one thing, too much Photoshop just ruin the natural look of any Photo. People need to understand it very well.


A huge +1 from me.


Ha
11/11/2015 07:01:22 AM · #23
Originally posted by shumicpi:

Just want to say one thing, too much Photoshop just ruin the natural look of any Photo. People need to understand it very well.


But some photos don't look natural...
11/11/2015 08:10:47 AM · #24
Originally posted by Paul:

Originally posted by shumicpi:

Just want to say one thing, too much Photoshop just ruin the natural look of any Photo. People need to understand it very well.


But some photos don't look natural...


I think what was meant, or at least as I interpreted it (esp as I am guessing that English isn't shumicpi's native tongue) is that no amount of PS can improve a bad photo, and too much PS can easily ruin a good photo.

Discuss amongst yourselves, I have to go to work.
11/11/2015 10:58:06 AM · #25
A photograph is a photograph and can look however one wants.
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