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DPChallenge Forums >> Business of Photography >> Question ~ Photo Shoots
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02/01/2016 08:38:58 PM · #1
I recently did have a photo shoots for a family that I've known for years and and consider them personal friends (not overly close). Their daughter paid me for the shoot. She knows a little about editing (RAW) and has asked to have a copy of the pictures that I took. Here is my question.

I don't mind giving the pictures to them because they are friends. BUT I do mind if she edits them then posts them on FB, therefore altering my work. Is there a way that I can "lock" the pictures? So she can not edit them but can only look at them? I have already told them that I would give the photos to them...

One other thing. In the future how would you recommend that I handle this kind of request? Say no? Charge a fee ~ if so what?

I'll be curious what ya'll have to say about this.
02/01/2016 08:44:55 PM · #2
I would say, and I think many would agree with me...Defend your RAWs with your life. You created the image; it's yours. Give clients jpgs. It really is just that simple.

Back in the day, nobody would ever dream of asking a photog to part with their film negatives; it was understood that negatives are irreplaceable. Clients got a contact sheet from which to choose the best images for printing. Your RAWs are imnsho your negatives.

If I think people just want images as social-media fodder, I do very light pp them, and make them jpgs of 800mp on the longest side. Now, once the clients get the images in their grubby little paws (esp someone who fancies themselves a PS artiste) they could do all kinds of ugly crap to them. So whenever I give someone an image for social media, I never watermark it.

Message edited by author 2016-02-01 20:49:08.
02/01/2016 08:46:05 PM · #3
.duhble post

Message edited by author 2016-02-01 20:46:32.
02/01/2016 08:56:13 PM · #4
Originally posted by Ja-9:

I recently did have a photo shoots for a family that I've known for years and and consider them personal friends (not overly close). Their daughter paid me for the shoot. She knows a little about editing (RAW) and has asked to have a copy of the pictures that I took. Here is my question.

I don't mind giving the pictures to them because they are friends. BUT I do mind if she edits them then posts them on FB, therefore altering my work. Is there a way that I can "lock" the pictures? So she can not edit them but can only look at them? I have already told them that I would give the photos to them...

One other thing. In the future how would you recommend that I handle this kind of request? Say no? Charge a fee ~ if so what?

I'll be curious what ya'll have to say about this.


Legally, the originals belong to the photographer. It's the same with Real Estate Photography, if agents claim the photos belong to them because they paid for them they are wrong. Same with wedding photography. In your case, you probably should have drawn up an agreement with your not so overly close friends about their rights concerning your photos.
02/01/2016 09:17:50 PM · #5
Don't confuse raw files with copyright. Copyright remains with the photographer, unless they choose to sell it. A popular photo can get hundreds of thousands of $ just for the copyright.

But to answer your question, it completely depends on the assignment and what you agree to. In commercial photography, the clients can pay 10s of thousands of $ and will receive the entire shoot, including raw files, for that amount.

Actors expect to see the whole shoot so they can make their own selection, as well as retouched jpgs of those selections.

If I were in your situation, I'd simply say that to keep control over the quality of your brand, you don't share your files.

Message edited by author 2016-02-01 21:21:04.
02/01/2016 09:42:56 PM · #6
10 year ago, maybe even 7 years ago, i would have been all high and mighty about protecting my images at all costs because it's my work!

today, i really don't care. why? because for the most part, it just doesn't matter.

my photography is either personal work, or it's commissioned.

if it's personal, well, it's mine and nobody gets it unless i want them to (and if they're willing to pay enough, i'll let them do what they want).

if it's commissioned, it depends on who's paying me to do what. if it's corporate work, well, they're going to do whatever they want anyway because that's what they're paying for.

if it's retail work, like a wedding or a portrait, it depends on what they're paying me for. if it's just basic, good photography that just about anyone with skill, experience, equipment, and/or luck could produce, then i'm not going to be pretentious and get all wiggy about letting them have files to edit, if that's their bent.

on the other hand, if they're paying me to produce some serious art that is uniquely and recognizably mine, then i'll be protective.

a lot of people throw out the argument that "it's your work, your image, your reputation", but i just haven't found that to be the case. people see so many 1000's and 1000's of images these days, every week, that they just really don't pay attention to where they come from - unless they are truly special and spectacular. you *know* when you have something truly special and spectacular. hold on to those. the rest of them? make a friend or two. be easy to get along with. share. even offer editing tips. why? because you stand to gain more in the relationship than you'll lose in reputation.
02/01/2016 09:57:46 PM · #7
Good advice from all...thank you for your time.
05/26/2016 09:06:45 AM · #8
Nice information.
05/26/2016 10:24:37 AM · #9
Tell her "Because I take my work and images seriously, please only share my images as they are without editing or filters."
And tell her whether or not you want to be credited if / when she posts them.
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