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DPChallenge Forums >> Individual Photograph Discussion >> Going Dutch
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04/20/2016 06:45:27 AM · #1
I need to ask a question about the Dutch Angle challenge, and the winner in particular. I absolutely love 21.gif DistantColours shot, and would have easily thought it the best photograph of the bunch in Free Study type challenge. But is it a representative example of a Dutch Angle?

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1179169.jpg

I ask this not to criticize the entry, or those who voted for it, but because I'm truly trying to learn something here. Every example I've ever seen of the Dutch Angle leaves you knowing where the true vertical and horizontal is, and I thought that was the point. This is a great example of altered perspective, but I suspect most of us can't tell where horizon is (I'm thinking this is shot directly up under a bridge of some type with no true horizon discernible even if you could pan in any direction).

Again, this is for my edification and not as criticism of the photograph. If you see my comment, I would have asked regardless of where this placed.
04/20/2016 12:47:43 PM · #2
i think the fact that it works either way, and can be seen as disconcerting from either angle, adds to the image and in no way detracts from, nor would make it not a fit for the challenge.
04/20/2016 12:58:06 PM · #3
Originally posted by RyanW:

i think the fact that it works either way, and can be seen as disconcerting from either angle, adds to the image and in no way detracts from, nor would make it not a fit for the challenge.


And I get that, but there are plenty of techniques that can give you a disconcerting feeling. The thing I find in every description of Dutch Angle is that it cants the horizon from the camera perspective, something that's completely imperceptible here.
04/20/2016 01:06:33 PM · #4
Originally posted by JakeKurdsjuk:

Originally posted by RyanW:

i think the fact that it works either way, and can be seen as disconcerting from either angle, adds to the image and in no way detracts from, nor would make it not a fit for the challenge.


And I get that, but there are plenty of techniques that can give you a disconcerting feeling. The thing I find in every description of Dutch Angle is that it cants the horizon from the camera perspective, something that's completely imperceptible here.

Well, my indoor shot doesn't have a "horizon" either ... I think what is meant is that elements which would normally be seen as exactly horizontal or vertical -- such as walls or other structural elements -- should be canted sufficiently ...

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1179231.jpg
04/20/2016 01:24:02 PM · #5
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by JakeKurdsjuk:

Originally posted by RyanW:

i think the fact that it works either way, and can be seen as disconcerting from either angle, adds to the image and in no way detracts from, nor would make it not a fit for the challenge.


And I get that, but there are plenty of techniques that can give you a disconcerting feeling. The thing I find in every description of Dutch Angle is that it cants the horizon from the camera perspective, something that's completely imperceptible here.

Well, my indoor shot doesn't have a "horizon" either ... I think what is meant is that elements which would normally be seen as exactly horizontal or vertical -- such as walls or other structural elements -- should be canted sufficiently ...

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1179231.jpg


Yours has an implied horizon, IMO. I think that horizon is important in Dutch Angles. I gave you a 6.. never went back to bump or comment but if I had the score might have gone up.
04/20/2016 01:47:51 PM · #6
Originally posted by PennyStreet:

Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by JakeKurdsjuk:

Originally posted by RyanW:

i think the fact that it works either way, and can be seen as disconcerting from either angle, adds to the image and in no way detracts from, nor would make it not a fit for the challenge.


And I get that, but there are plenty of techniques that can give you a disconcerting feeling. The thing I find in every description of Dutch Angle is that it cants the horizon from the camera perspective, something that's completely imperceptible here.

Well, my indoor shot doesn't have a "horizon" either ... I think what is meant is that elements which would normally be seen as exactly horizontal or vertical -- such as walls or other structural elements -- should be canted sufficiently ...

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1179231.jpg


Yours has an implied horizon, IMO. I think that horizon is important in Dutch Angles. I gave you a 6.. never went back to bump or comment but if I had the score might have gone up.


Exactly!! The "horizon" is whatever would imply or secure the level perspective, whether horizontal or vertical, were the camera not on an angle. Yours definitely has that. In fact there was only one other shot (Robert's "BridgeScape") that I felt lacked the element, though it has enough there for me to imply what vertical/horizontal should be - even if I don't believe it to be a "Dutch Angle" shot.
04/20/2016 02:00:45 PM · #7
Very good post and I learned a lot from looking at this challenge. I took some time to do a little research and wanted to share a nice article with video exploring the many angles of the dutch tilt in cinematography. As you watch the video, there is one shot with the waves hitting the beach that when shot at a tilt implies discomfort or pending trouble, which is what the dutch tilt is used for. I thought that was a good example of the dutch tilt effect in landscape photography where the horizon was not so important. (Link follows)

http://oneperfectshotdb.com/news/watch-the-dutch-angle-in-effect/

Then to follow that up, I found a snippet from an Ebook found on google books that shows how the dutch tilt can be paired with urban exploration photography to create drama in the scene, which I believe demonstrates why the blue ribbon winning shot given as the example for the discussion is a great example of the dutch tilt. There is a short paragraph followed by a photo showing the technique.

Urban Exploration Photography: A Guide to Creating and Editing Images of Abandoned Places

If the example photo was a motion picture scene, I can imagine using this camera angle and rolling into a shot of, say, the bridge of the death star, or even having the camera still, yet tilted and placing a hero and/or heroine in the scene being chased along one level of the multi level deck. That would definitely create a sense of impending trouble or doom to me.

Message edited by author 2016-04-20 14:04:28.
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