DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> Photography Discussion >> Lighting Lessons -- anyone care to teach me?
Pages:  
Showing posts 26 - 35 of 35, (reverse)
AuthorThread
01/29/2017 09:27:10 AM · #26
Originally posted by MichaelC:

This guy does great lighting tuts in a small home studio for Adorama.


I've seen some of his stuff, and I agree! I really like him. I just noticed he had a home studio series. His studio is huge compared to mine, but I'm going to start that one. Thanks!
01/29/2017 03:26:26 PM · #27
Two words and two names: Luminosity Masks with Tony Kuyper and Sean Bagwell.

It's changed the way I look at not just the lighting I managed to capture, but how I enhance it in post. Tony produces a Photoshop panel that makes implementing this stuff so easy, and Sean has mastered the technique and has a series of videos that go into great detail on how to make it work for you. Takes some time to get the hang of thinking that way, but once you do your post processing will explode. Great stuff.
01/29/2017 05:10:38 PM · #28
Originally posted by vawendy:

Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by giantmike:

Lack of space doesn't have to be a roadblock. You just need something that will cut your light output. A neutral density gel will do it.

Or if you are shooting through something (like a softbox), you could add layers of printer paper to block some of the light (if you don't have any, buy some gaffers tape to affix the paper).

In fact, this can be better than moving away.

If you are trying to get the light to "fall off" faster from one side of the model to the other I think the inverse-square law dictates that the light be closer to the subject, with the intensity reduced to make a correct exposure on the near side.


Yes -- I've tried that.

But that must be my problem. I'm moving it in closer in order to have it fall off faster, but because of that, I'm getting a softer light with softer shadows.

That's why the hotshoe flash gave me more contrast, because I had it close in -- but it was a smaller source!

So I really can't have an abrupt fall off and still a high contrasty subject if I have a large light source!


I think your solution is right here, as you said, the speedlite gave more contrast because it was a smaller source. It also gave more contrast because speedlite's produce a more focused light source. Using a bowl reflector or beauty dish, possibly with a grid will probably give you a similar light to what you were getting with the smaller speedlite.
02/07/2017 08:21:49 AM · #29
I believe that this is the trick you are looking for.
The Secret to Take Stunning Portraits is a Strip Softbox
02/07/2017 08:23:23 PM · #30
Originally posted by damjanev:

I believe that this is the trick you are looking for.
The Secret to Take Stunning Portraits is a Strip Softbox


Thanks for the link! I'm finding that I'm using the strip box for everything -- but they had some interesting ideas about angling that I hadn't thought of. I'd angled it before, but never angled out before. I'll have to do some serious experimenting.
02/07/2017 10:55:46 PM · #31
I remember a series of books on lighting written by a chap called Mortenson back in the late 50s 60s I found them excellent and he made things easy, he was an american photographer. try used book shops they may be a help .
02/08/2017 01:45:34 AM · #32
Originally posted by vawendy:

Originally posted by damjanev:

I believe that this is the trick you are looking for.
The Secret to Take Stunning Portraits is a Strip Softbox


Thanks for the link! I'm finding that I'm using the strip box for everything -- but they had some interesting ideas about angling that I hadn't thought of. I'd angled it before, but never angled out before. I'll have to do some serious experimenting.


Angles and grids.
02/21/2017 06:10:22 AM · #33
Not only the post but also all of the replies helped a lot to understand the effect of lighting as well as how to use it effectively during taking any shot.
04/20/2017 06:07:11 PM · #34
How to Shoot Great Portraits in Tiny Spaces (brief article and 9-minute video)
04/21/2017 02:33:35 PM · #35
Originally posted by damjanev:

Originally posted by vawendy:

Originally posted by damjanev:

I believe that this is the trick you are looking for.
The Secret to Take Stunning Portraits is a Strip Softbox


Thanks for the link! I'm finding that I'm using the strip box for everything -- but they had some interesting ideas about angling that I hadn't thought of. I'd angled it before, but never angled out before. I'll have to do some serious experimenting.


Angles and grids.


Thats very effective lighting thanks
Pages:  
Current Server Time: 06/24/2017 03:19:42 PM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2017 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 06/24/2017 03:19:42 PM EDT.