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DPChallenge Forums >> Photography Discussion >> Do you use auto ISO?
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08/26/2017 05:08:03 PM · #1
I never use it. I set my ISO. But I was out walking with the new camera and it was on auto. So I was getting pictures in the woods that were set to 6400 ISO.

If I didn't have auto set, I would have been experimenting with that I wanted/what would work. Auto ISO might give you an ISO that you don't want, but it seems like you wouldn't miss shots that way. Maybe just get lousy shots.

What do you do?
08/26/2017 05:40:11 PM · #2
I probably use Auto-ISO for 80% of shooting. It's incredibly handy I find - particularly for weddings where you may be quickly moving through drastically changing lighting conditions. I'll only really set the ISO manually when it's totally needed - say when I'm shooting a particular scene where I really want to make the shadows a feature and spot metering is not getting the result I want so I need to tie the ISO down to 100. Or if i'm using flash.

ISO is the most boring of exposure elements really so i'm happy for the camera to sort that out and i'll deal with the aperture and shutter speed, both of which have more creative aspects to them if that makes sense.

Message edited by author 2017-08-26 18:10:06.
08/26/2017 05:45:57 PM · #3
I use it quite often, especially when I'm wandering around markets where the light can vary considerably. I do set a maximum ISO so that I don't end up with really really high ISO (my Sony goes up to ridiculously high ISO).
08/26/2017 06:14:46 PM · #4
Originally posted by salmiakki:

I do set a maximum ISO so that I don't end up with really really high ISO (my Sony goes up to ridiculously high ISO).


Yea, I set a maximum of 6400 and set a minimum shutter speed of 1/250 or 1/320 or something. I tend to shoot in Aperture Priority then, if I go into somewhere particularly dark, I'll switch to full Manual with a set shutter speed of 1/125.
08/26/2017 07:15:08 PM · #5
It's like they say: if you're wandering around in very changeable light conditions, auto-iso with a limiter can be a godsend. If you're in a blind shooting birds, you don't need it :-) Your new Sony will give you very decent low-noise performance up to 3200 ISO IMO, and it's usable at 6,400 from what I have seen. It wouldn't be a bad idea to set auto-iso as your default in-the-bag setting, just so you can always count on getting a decent exposure and shutter speed in an O..M..G encounter. But be mindful that you want to go back to some other setting as appropriate. That's where custom settings come in; you can set C1 and C2 to specific parameters for specific sorts of jobs.
08/26/2017 08:38:47 PM · #6
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

It's like they say: if you're wandering around in very changeable light conditions, auto-iso with a limiter can be a godsend. If you're in a blind shooting birds, you don't need it.


"They" actually say this??!
08/26/2017 08:57:32 PM · #7
Originally posted by Lydia:

Originally posted by Bear_Music:

It's like they say: if you're wandering around in very changeable light conditions, auto-iso with a limiter can be a godsend. If you're in a blind shooting birds, you don't need it.


"They" actually say this??!


I think Bear was referring to myself and salmiakki as 'They' referring to our posts above.. Auto ISO is great in those conditions we mentioned. If you are doing landscape or wildlife or more slowed down types of photos then it's probably just as well to set the ISO as you will. That's what I do anyway.
08/26/2017 10:35:09 PM · #8
Set a maximum auto iso of 3200. I use Auto ISO all the time but watch it whilst shooting. I move away from it when I need to take creative control.
08/26/2017 11:31:41 PM · #9
No. I tend to use 400 as a good general purpose ISO in outdoor conditions and raise it as needed. I used to use 200, but cameras have gotten better and my current one has less noise at 400 than my earlier cameras had at 200.
08/26/2017 11:35:42 PM · #10
Originally posted by rooum:

Originally posted by Lydia:

Originally posted by Bear_Music:

It's like they say: if you're wandering around in very changeable light conditions, auto-iso with a limiter can be a godsend. If you're in a blind shooting birds, you don't need it.

"They" actually say this??!

I think Bear was referring to myself and salmiakki as 'They' referring to our posts above.. Auto ISO is great in those conditions we mentioned. If you are doing landscape or wildlife or more slowed down types of photos then it's probably just as well to set the ISO as you will. That's what I do anyway.

Bingo!
08/27/2017 12:00:18 AM · #11
I use it quite often too. Anywhere that is reasonably dark or changing light conditions. I started doing it years ago when I would shoot my daughter at gymnastics, and found that it would get me a lot of shots that I wouldn't have otherwise gotten. I would usually shoot in manual and then only change the shutter speed depending on whether I was shooting something with a lot of action or not, and kept the aperture as wide open as I could.
08/27/2017 03:45:10 AM · #12
i use auto everything always
08/27/2017 03:45:46 AM · #13
in the whole life thing
08/27/2017 12:30:52 PM · #14
I use Auto ISO pretty regularly. I shoot sports 80% of the time. With changing light and field conditions it is a godsend. I do set a minimum shutter speed and maximum ISO.
08/27/2017 02:56:53 PM · #15
I never use AUTO ISO (and almost always use white balance on sunlight) but I suppose if you have a camera that supports a very high ISO it would be a good idea in low or varying light. I should try it:)
In bright light situations, I would assume it would be safer to set on 100 ISO or less. I also set to compensate exposure.
But this is just me.. I'm not an expert, I just know what I do.
08/27/2017 03:04:21 PM · #16
I don't. I just take my chances, knowing that I prefer my own settings. Possibly I delude myself that this is Quality Control, because heaven knows I can be ecstatic over a poorly exposed but interesting to me result.
08/27/2017 03:27:58 PM · #17
My camera is set to use auto ISO more often than not. Since moving from the 7D to the 80D it's been set to a maximum of ISO 6400 (default setting), compared to ISO 3200 on the 7D and I've been amazed by how much sharper my low light photos are.
08/27/2017 04:49:27 PM · #18
Never. Standard my ISO is set to 100. Depending on light conditions I adjust the settings, normally between ISO 50 and ISO 800
08/27/2017 08:11:12 PM · #19
All the time.

I have a default "Semi-Auto" mode that I set up that enables me to just haul the camera up and get the shot.

Auto ISO, Aperture priority, Auto WB, and autofocus.

I do 95% of my shooting that way.
08/27/2017 09:35:26 PM · #20
In low light:

ISO auto (max 3200)
Aperture 1.4 (wide open)
Shutter something under 1/200th a second

Example shot at ISO 3200 and shutter 1/125th of a second:

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1204652.jpg
08/28/2017 01:52:09 AM · #21
Never ever....
08/28/2017 03:39:05 AM · #22
Auto ISO screws up my control of exposure so it's a BIG NO NO from me. I can see how it would be useful in certain situations but for what I do, I need total control
08/28/2017 08:03:16 AM · #23
ISO 6400

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1098384.jpg

Nikon has come a long way with their noise issues...
08/28/2017 08:15:57 AM · #24
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1203204.jpg

ISO 6400 - unprocessed

I'd rather have a little noise than a blurred shot.

Message edited by author 2017-08-28 08:18:17.
08/28/2017 09:09:34 AM · #25
From what I can see, auto ISO is good for stationary objects. Even though it recognizes objects moving and adjusts the focus, it's not smart enough to know to adjust the ISO. So it gave me an ISO of 200, but a shutter speed of 1/30-1/60 and the moving dog was blurry in every shot.

Hmmm... just thought that through as I was typing. If I'm going for something moving, switch from aperture to shutter. I never used that because I would set my ISO and keep the shutter wide open and get what I could, switching ISO when needed.

Ok... time to rethink the whole shooting process. I feel like my world has been turned upside down. There were very distinct reasons that I shot how I shot, and those are starting to dissolve before me.

bizzarre.
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