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DPChallenge Forums >> General Discussion >> Long exposures with ND filters
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09/25/2017 02:45:54 PM · #1
So, I've been told by a few people who have used ND filters in the past that it is rather difficult to see through the lens... This I assume would cause some issues when figuring out what shutter speed to use when using an ND filter. There's an app for it I've seen from Scott Kelby and I know it's not expensive at $1.00 but was wondering if I even need it?

I purchased a 6 stop ND filter so I am not sure if that's so dark I won't be able to see or if I'll be okay to do without...

Thoughts?
09/25/2017 02:59:19 PM · #2
You may have trouble framing and focusing through the filter, but calculating exposure is basic -- figure out the correct exposure and increase it by the number of stops for which the filter is rated (6 in your case). Frame and focus without the filter, lock in the exposure and focus and put the filter back on and shoot.

FWIW you can also use two stacked polarizing filters to make a variable ND filter (though in some positions it's not exactly "neutral") which is close to 4 stops maximum -- I have some samples of those in a folder here ...

Message edited by author 2017-09-25 15:33:47.
09/25/2017 03:21:21 PM · #3
Thanks,
I guess I can always play around with exposures until I get it right. Haha.
09/25/2017 03:31:54 PM · #4
What kind of scenes do you plan to shoot?
09/25/2017 03:35:56 PM · #5
Well, since I'll be going to Niagara falls here in just a couple days... Mostly waterscapes/landscapes for my first take... After that, I definitely want to try my hand at some cityscapes when I can. I also want to try and get into some creative light painting stuff.


Essentially I'd use it for practically anything its useful for. I don't have much of a plan other than using the hell out of it. I've always loved long exposure photography.
09/25/2017 03:42:02 PM · #6
I use different ND filters, one of them a 10-stop filter. When using that kind of filters it make sure you focus first and then switch off the autofocus (or when you use the back button focus there is no need to switch autofocus off), check the exposure values, put the filter in place and then, like 1031.gif GeneralE already stated, increase the shutterspeed for the number of stops.
09/25/2017 03:51:14 PM · #7
For your filter you want to check the exposure without the filter, and then increase by multiplying by two six times ... for example if the "correct" exposure is 1/100 then with the filter you'll need to increase it to about 2/3 second ... it should only take a couple of test shots to home-in on it. Be sure to show off the non-entry ones with some info!
09/25/2017 03:56:17 PM · #8
Originally posted by GeneralE:

For your filter you want to check the exposure without the filter, and then increase by multiplying by two six times ... for example if the "correct" exposure is 1/100 then with the filter you'll need to increase it to about 2/3 second ... it should only take a couple of test shots to home-in on it. Be sure to show off the non-entry ones with some info!


I will.
I'll be back Sunday night and work Monday til around 6:00 so I should have some time to edit on Monday but if not then, Tuesday I will have plenty of time to edit. :)
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