DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> Business of Photography >> selling a pic for ongoing usage
Pages:  
Showing posts 1 - 15 of 15, (reverse)
AuthorThread
03/19/2018 12:53:55 PM · #1
Hey all, esp the pros here...I got a message here from someone asking permission to use one of my images for a brochure for clients, so usage would be ongoing. I have checked him out and he and the company he says he 's with both check out.

Now, how to price this image for sale? I was thinking a one-time fee, for use only in the brochure and on the site, and if they want to use it further they can pay more for its use. I don't want to hose the guy but don't want to get hosed in turn either!

Message edited by author 2018-03-19 13:00:12.
03/19/2018 02:26:14 PM · #2
*crickets chirping*

Well I went ahead and looked up what price Alamy would charge for the same sort of usage and have quoted him $150 USD for website and 5-year run on the brochure. Thoughts?
03/19/2018 07:27:18 PM · #3
Well if thats the going rate go for it, its all $ inthe bank..
03/20/2018 07:41:15 AM · #4
lol, you should know that expecting a quick response on dpc is like thinking thumbing a ride is quicker than uber ;-)

There are a handful of considerations when negotiating a license fee:
1) What is the standard fee?
2) What is the client budget?
3) What is it worth to you?

Somewhere in the middle will be the number on which you and your client agree.

As for the standard fee, you did pretty much what I do, except that I also use Getty images. As you are well aware, licensing is either rights-managed (RM) or royalty-free (RF). Most of my licenses are RM, with the license detailing the specific usages allowed. I base my fee off the usage calculation (type of publication, placement, size, runs, length of time, etc.). Once I have a budget figure from the client, we negotiate to an acceptable number (usually meaning I take less money and they get less usage, i.e., maybe 2 years instead of 5).

When thinking about it's worth to you, you have to be both realistic with the marketplace and fair to yourself. Is it an image they could easily replicate and not even involve you? Or is your image so unique that there's no way to recreate it? Does your image have such broad appeal that a number of other businesses might license it? Or is really only suitable for a few? Was your image just a spontaneous grab, made without a whole lot of thought, planning, or effort? Or was it part of a project that required a significant investment of time and money? If you don't have much in the image and someone stumbled across it and is willing to throw you a few bucks, then take it and treat yourself to a nice dinner or put it in your gear fund. On the other hand, if you have invested in the image, don't let it go for less much less than what the market leaders are asking.

One last thing to keep in mind in terms of negotiating is the wiggle-room you have by dealing direct. Coming straight to you, it's all your money. With Alamy or Getty, there are commissions involved. This means you can offer the license for less than them and still make more than you would had the client licensed your image through a service. This is just something to consider, but not a suggestion that you start your pricing at the commissioned value of the image; it's just additional wiggle-room, if you need it.

Hope it works out!

<now back to the chirping...>

Message edited by author 2018-03-20 07:43:08.
03/21/2018 08:49:09 AM · #5
Thanks for the feedback, Skip. I did check on Alamy to see what they would charge these people to use the image for, then passed on the info to them. Ironically when they sent me the mockup of the brochure for which they intend to use my image, I saw virtually identical images dropped in already from Getty!

Maybe they were hoping for a freebie from some poor dumb schmuck on a competitive photog site who would be insanely flattered that someone wanted to use my image! hehe Anyway haven't heard back from them so maybe they've decided to not bother.
03/21/2018 10:19:11 AM · #6
Originally posted by snaffles:

Thanks for the feedback, Skip. I did check on Alamy to see what they would charge these people to use the image for, then passed on the info to them. Ironically when they sent me the mockup of the brochure for which they intend to use my image, I saw virtually identical images dropped in already from Getty!

Maybe they were hoping for a freebie from some poor dumb schmuck on a competitive photog site who would be insanely flattered that someone wanted to use my image! hehe Anyway haven't heard back from them so maybe they've decided to not bother.


lol, that's why i always ask, "what's your budget" as soon as possible. it's the best gauge as to whether you're dealing with someone serious, who has a clue, or not. when the response is, "well, we don't have one. can you give us a ballpark figure?" i typically tell them that i'll be more than glad to work with them once they have a budget. pisses off some people, but that's their problem, not mine. no sense wasting time. when they push, i'll tell them that there are a lot of factors that go into pricing, but until they have an idea as to what they can afford, i can't begin to guide them.
03/22/2018 09:35:29 PM · #7
Thanks for the advice, Skip, will keep it in mind for next time this happens :-)
03/26/2018 02:34:16 PM · #8
Hey all, oooh now they want exclusivity! Just got this:

Please get in writing, permission for commercial use and to reproduce the image, including the rights to edit the image. For example, we would want to remove the manís hat and legs from the background. Also, we would like that no one else can use the image and/or you canít sell it to anyone else.

As far as image requirements, if you could please send the original/raw image, as large as possible, but at least 300 ppi.

Please let me know your thoughts.


Skip, thoughts and advice?
03/26/2018 03:00:56 PM · #9
Exclusivity should probably engender at least a 5-to-10-fold increase in the licensing fee, depending on the length of the license. Make sure they know (in writing) that it is a license for a specific use and time period, and not a transfer of copyright or "sale" -- and that they don't have the right to re-license it or use it for anything else.

Just a guess that they're back because they checked the price of an exclusive license at Getty (where they got their "sample" image?) and found the price was probably into the four-figure range ... :-)

Good luck!
03/31/2018 09:42:11 AM · #10
Originally posted by snaffles:

Hey all, oooh now they want exclusivity! Just got this:
:
As far as image requirements, if you could please send the original/raw image, as large as possible, but at least 300 ppi.
:


I find this one amusing (and common). Digital images don't have ppi, or dpi, they only have a length and width in pixels.
03/31/2018 10:22:38 AM · #11
Originally posted by FromDaRock:

Originally posted by snaffles:

Hey all, oooh now they want exclusivity! Just got this:
:
As far as image requirements, if you could please send the original/raw image, as large as possible, but at least 300 ppi.
:


I find this one amusing (and common). Digital images don't have ppi, or dpi, they only have a length and width in pixels.

Well, they have a dpi setting (and different cameras have different default settings), but it only has an effect when the image is printed to a physical medium ... if they had said "at least 10 inches at 300ppi" it would be a meaningful request; exactly the same as requesting "at least 3000 pixels"
03/31/2018 09:15:31 PM · #12
Originally posted by snaffles:

Hey all, oooh now they want exclusivity! Just got this:

Please get in writing, permission for commercial use and to reproduce the image, including the rights to edit the image. For example, we would want to remove the manís hat and legs from the background. Also, we would like that no one else can use the image and/or you canít sell it to anyone else.

As far as image requirements, if you could please send the original/raw image, as large as possible, but at least 300 ppi.

Please let me know your thoughts.


Skip, thoughts and advice?
\

Honestly, at this point I would walk away because I am pretty sure they would not pay me what I want for exclusive use. That means the image is out of circulation and I can't make any more money from it until their contract is up. I also get the feeling that they want to use the image forever, not some set number of years or x number of print runs.........................or basically to own the copyright of the image and for that I highly doubt they want to pay that amount.
04/01/2018 07:28:51 PM · #13
Just an update. I got back to them and made it very clear that if they wanted exclusivity and/or the original, and the copyright etc it would cost them very big $$. They have since backed down and are back to the more realistic initial request in the original post. I have offered to do the required pp on the image for a few extra $$ as I have no idea how good their graphic designer may be at cloning out the teamster.
04/09/2018 04:33:42 PM · #14
bump
04/18/2018 04:11:17 AM · #15
Originally posted by snaffles:

bump

i see your bump and raise you one ;-)
Pages:  
Current Server Time: 04/20/2018 03:32:18 AM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2018 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 04/20/2018 03:32:18 AM EDT.