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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Solid State Hard Drive
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Showing posts 26 - 39 of 39, (reverse)
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09/22/2011 11:24:51 AM · #26
I have my os and applications on a SSD and all my other stuff on a normal drive, the start up time is amazingly quick and post processing is also quicker and of course everything is so silent, a must for me from now on.
09/22/2011 11:28:46 AM · #27
I just put in an order for an SSD myself. I have been watching for prices to drop and reliability to improve, and I now believe it's a decent time to buy. I went with a 120 GB drive which will be my OS/Application drive, but I also will be doing photo editing (mainly Aperture and the plugins) there before I send the final results to the external data drive.

I will try to remember to update this thread with my experiences with this setup.
09/22/2011 11:50:40 AM · #28
My problem is that I need one of the larger drives, which raises cost significantly. My current set-up results in 160GB of space for OS and apps, and I'm running at about 108GB in use. In order for the wear leveling algorithms to work well on the SSDs, you need to maintain a minimum of 30% free space. So I'm right at the limit for a 160GB SSD. If I could pare down, I might make it, but I probably need to consider something a little bigger.
09/22/2011 04:23:15 PM · #29
Originally posted by kirbic:

My problem is that I need one of the larger drives, which raises cost significantly. My current set-up results in 160GB of space for OS and apps, and I'm running at about 108GB in use. In order for the wear leveling algorithms to work well on the SSDs, you need to maintain a minimum of 30% free space. So I'm right at the limit for a 160GB SSD. If I could pare down, I might make it, but I probably need to consider something a little bigger.

If the SSD is too expensive, only option I see is a 10,000rpm drive. Not as good, but best of the leftovers.
09/22/2011 07:11:35 PM · #30
The problems with SSD's is that each area of flash memory can only be written to a finite number of times, so they utilise wear levelling to try and constantly spread the data about so prolong the life of the drive.

So, an SSD is great if you write to it rarely and use it as storage from which you read frequently, and the access is really fast. The problem is most people use the SSD as a boot drive for the operating system and store their data elsewhere.

Well, the operating system will constantly be writing to that SSD (especially if pagefile.sys is on there and you're short on RAM) so the life of the drive will be seriously reduced.

They are certainly a fad due to the "newness" of the tech and the speed they provide, but personally I see them as a short term fix until a more durable solution arrives. Personally, I cast see the cost/benefit tradeoff at this time.
09/22/2011 07:23:00 PM · #31
Originally posted by lawrysimm:

The problems with SSD's is that each area of flash memory can only be written to a finite number of times, so they utilise wear levelling to try and constantly spread the data about so prolong the life of the drive.


As long as there's enough open space (about 30%) for the wear-leveling algorithms to work well, the lifetime of an SSD, even in use with an OS, is *far* longer than for a spinning hard disk. It's not intuitive, but it's true. Now, like any device, they can still fail for reasons not related to wear-out. That's quite another matter.
09/22/2011 09:25:33 PM · #32
Originally posted by gcoulson:

If the SSD is too expensive, only option I see is a 10,000rpm drive. Not as good, but best of the leftovers.

Apple's new Thunderbolt ports have opened up a third option. Current Macs can get about 200MB/s with a LaCie Little Big disk... and that's with 5400RPM drives! They're fairly cheap, too: 1TB for $399 and 2TB for $499. Daisy chaining multiple drives makes 'em go faster, and they have 7200rpm and SSD versions, too.
09/22/2011 10:45:30 PM · #33
We're moving to exclusively SSHD's at work...we could get more performance by upgrading the antique software we're running, or using Excel to do every goddamn thing, but dammit we'll have bad-ass hardware.
09/23/2011 08:54:44 AM · #34
Originally posted by scalvert:

Originally posted by gcoulson:

If the SSD is too expensive, only option I see is a 10,000rpm drive. Not as good, but best of the leftovers.

Apple's new Thunderbolt ports have opened up a third option. Current Macs can get about 200MB/s with a LaCie Little Big disk... and that's with 5400RPM drives! They're fairly cheap, too: 1TB for $399 and 2TB for $499. Daisy chaining multiple drives makes 'em go faster, and they have 7200rpm and SSD versions, too.


aaah, very cool. I was wondering how long before thunderbolt ports were up and running.

must. go. see.
09/23/2011 11:26:10 AM · #35
Originally posted by scalvert:

Originally posted by gcoulson:

If the SSD is too expensive, only option I see is a 10,000rpm drive. Not as good, but best of the leftovers.

Apple's new Thunderbolt ports have opened up a third option. Current Macs can get about 200MB/s with a LaCie Little Big disk... and that's with 5400RPM drives! They're fairly cheap, too: 1TB for $399 and 2TB for $499. Daisy chaining multiple drives makes 'em go faster, and they have 7200rpm and SSD versions, too.

Sigh...no Apple in my immediate future!
09/23/2011 12:20:05 PM · #36
I think Apple will have success with the Thunderbird port. It's the kind of out-of-the-box thinking that we've come to expect from Apple. It's really a re-packaging of data-transfer protocols already in place (PCI Express, Displayport), but the potential is enormous. Connect multiple peripherals including data storage and display on one cable.
Time will tell whether the PC market picks up on it or not. I see the workstation market as potentially the place where adoption would be most rapid. that would be driven by the need for high-capacity, high-speed external storage and advanced display support.

ETA:
All that aside, SSD is going to be the storage option of choice where a fast, moderate-capacity internal drive is needed.

Message edited by author 2011-09-23 12:21:11.
09/23/2011 01:57:35 PM · #37
Originally posted by kirbic:

I think Apple will have success with the Thunderbird port. It's the kind of out-of-the-box thinking that we've come to expect from Apple.


According to Apple's webpage, Thunderbolt began at Intel Labs.
09/23/2011 09:34:59 PM · #38
Originally posted by kirbic:

I think Apple will have success with the Thunderbird port. It's the kind of out-of-the-box thinking that we've come to expect from Apple. It's really a re-packaging of data-transfer protocols already in place (PCI Express, Displayport), but the potential is enormous. Connect multiple peripherals including data storage and display on one cable.
Time will tell whether the PC market picks up on it or not. I see the workstation market as potentially the place where adoption would be most rapid. that would be driven by the need for high-capacity, high-speed external storage and advanced display support.

ETA:
All that aside, SSD is going to be the storage option of choice where a fast, moderate-capacity internal drive is needed.

Like Nordlys said, Thunderbolt was developed by Intel with collaboration with Apple. The debut on Macs will help popularize the standard, as it did with USB, and many PCS will get Thunderbolt next year when Intel rolls out their Cactus Ridge chips. Meanwhile, SSD is far from a sure bet as the storage option of choice going forward even for moderate capacity. A 4TB Pegasus RAID costs $999 and transfers 800GB/s over Thunderbolt, and 1-2TB drives will probably become widely available within a matter of months and beat SSD on both price and performance.

The combined protocols of Thunderbolt open up some interesting possibilities, too. Apple's new Thunderbolt display is essentially designed as a full workstation dock for laptop users. It has Thunderbolt and MagSafe connectors on the end of the cable, so you can charge your laptop while Firewire and USB ports on the back of the monitor serve as hubs for all sorts of desktop peripheralsó all running over that single cable.

Message edited by author 2011-09-23 21:41:24.
10/01/2011 11:54:13 AM · #39
I have had my SSD installed for a couple weeks now, and here are my first impressions.

* Boot times and application launch times are insanely fast
* Running out of memory (I have 8GB, but with various applications open, that fills up pretty quickly) is no longer the death spiral it used to be. Hitting the Virtual Memory with a hard drive was murder for performance, but with the SSD, I never even notice it. It's almost like I have extra RAM
* Aperture use isn't all that much faster, seems like most operations are CPU bound instead of disk bound. This is also true for Topaz plugins. The notable exception here is when memory is filled and I'm using a lot of virtual memory. Previously that brought Aperture to a halt while the page ins/outs caught up.
* Nik HDR Efex Pro seems a little bit quicker, probably because it creates a TIFF for each file in the HDR sequence, which is a much quicker operation now.
* General application response seems somewhat better. For instance, loading pages in Safari (likely due to quicker access of Cached data) and navigating around Outlook (due to the size of the database).

Note that my setup is a 2009 Mac Book Pro (2.66 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo) which only supports 1.5 Gbps on the SATA bus (for third party SSDs). I imagine with a faster computer that this drive would make even more of a difference in performance, as it could meet its flu potential instead of being held back.

Overall I'm very happy with this upgrade, it will definitely postpone my need for a new laptop for at least another year.
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