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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> Best natural Light
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07/06/2004 06:45:31 PM · #1
when is the best time to shoot in natural light in the summer?
Trying to do a last minute shoot for the challenge 2nite. Was too sunny earlier.
Thanks in advance dpcers!
07/06/2004 06:47:16 PM · #2
Sunrise, sunset and not much in between :) Unless of course it is overcast....
07/06/2004 06:48:14 PM · #3
Originally posted by kiwiness:

Sunrise, sunset and not much in between :) Unless of course it is overcast....


cool! thanks much! Gonna have to figure when that is in nyc!
07/06/2004 06:49:14 PM · #4
Isn't it always overcast in NY?
07/06/2004 06:49:23 PM · #5
I seem to get my best results when the sun is low in the sky ... early morning or late afternoon/evening. Brings out the contrast and colors and the shadows often add drama. I have also gotten good results mid day on overcast days and avoided the harsh lights and shadows.

Message edited by author 2004-07-06 18:50:05.
07/06/2004 06:52:06 PM · #6
Originally posted by kiwiness:

Sunrise, sunset and not much in between :) Unless of course it is overcast....


Live in San Francisco and you pretty much get constant overcast. A warming filter has helped a little. I think it's time to look into graduated filters.
07/06/2004 06:55:04 PM · #7
Originally posted by faidoi:

Live in San Francisco and you pretty much get constant overcast. A warming filter has helped a little. I think it's time to look into graduated filters.


Lucky I don't live there then.... I don't own any filters :)
07/06/2004 06:56:57 PM · #8
to all the NYCers, sunset 2day & most of the summer is around 8:30pm!
I'll be out just before then to shoot my shot.

Gary,
is 7:30pm too early?
07/06/2004 07:02:23 PM · #9
about half an hour to an hour before and after sunrise and sunset, depending on what point on the earth you are at.


07/06/2004 07:15:01 PM · #10
Originally posted by kiwiness:

Originally posted by faidoi:

Live in San Francisco and you pretty much get constant overcast. A warming filter has helped a little. I think it's time to look into graduated filters.


Lucky I don't live there then.... I don't own any filters :)

Like you need any. :)

07/06/2004 08:39:53 PM · #11
For whatever it's worth, here are a couple freewares that give the sunrise/sunset times in your area:

Sunrise/Sunset Calculator
Moonrise

The second one is my personal favorite - contrary to its name, it shows times for not only moonrise and moonset, but also sunrise, sunset, twlight and transit. Both are small, simple programs and easy to install/run. Some of you might find one or both of these programs beneficial. Enjoy! :-)

--T.C.
07/06/2004 09:00:24 PM · #12
As others have already said, sunrise and sunset are ideal times to shoot for better shadows and quality of light. One thing to consider is that if you are going to shoot at sunset than it can be very important to know beforehand exactly where you are going to shoot. This is both for getting to the location in enough time to shoot and also for safety reasons. Many place are not the safest after dark. If you can, you may want to go out at sunrise because even if you miss the best light for your intended shoot you still have plenty of light for other shooting situations and, of course you will be safer. There can also be less traffic and people to contend with early in the morning. In my area, Seattle/Tacoma WA that is a big deal.

T

Message edited by author 2004-07-06 21:00:56.
07/06/2004 09:14:54 PM · #13
' . substr('//mikilo.image.pbase.com/u47/kpbryan/small/31029432.P7040700_1a.jpg', strrpos('//mikilo.image.pbase.com/u47/kpbryan/small/31029432.P7040700_1a.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

I just took this Sunday. Clear day... about 1:00 in the afternoon. Not the best time, but I was able to use the bright reflections off the surrounding area, and sit her under a trellis.

Sometimes you just have to "seek out" the best light, or know it when you see it. :)

Message edited by author 2004-07-07 20:02:17.
07/07/2004 12:10:24 AM · #14
best advice I found for finding good/ interesting light - go and find where the light isn't, then look the other way...
07/07/2004 12:47:00 AM · #15
When's the best time? It all depends on what kind of light you want. For bright, directional light, I take my shots when the sun is at its brightest--but I do it in the shade, usually on my front porch.

Other commenters have mentioned other times when the sun is interesting and has unique traits.
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