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DPChallenge Forums >> Challenge Results >> That Ain't No Euphemism
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03/13/2012 05:03:59 PM · #1
Did anyone else notice that the red and yellow ribbons in the euphemism challenge aren't euphemisms? Sorry I'm late, but I just noticed this.
03/13/2012 05:06:08 PM · #2
Over a third of the entries aren't euphemisms.

CS
03/13/2012 05:44:34 PM · #3
How ironic.... um.. ok... maybe not :-)
03/13/2012 05:52:47 PM · #4
I'm pretty sure the yellow ribbon is one...
03/13/2012 06:02:01 PM · #5
Originally posted by posthumous:

Did anyone else notice that the red and yellow ribbons in the euphemism challenge aren't euphemisms? Sorry I'm late, but I just noticed this.


You said mine was more litotes than euphemism. I had to go look up a definiton of litotes, which I read but I still don't think I know what it is.
03/13/2012 07:20:40 PM · #6
And the blue in the ARTROTFL challenge is anywhere close to his style, But who's keeping track?
03/13/2012 07:48:25 PM · #7
Originally posted by PennyStreet:

Originally posted by posthumous:

Did anyone else notice that the red and yellow ribbons in the euphemism challenge aren't euphemisms? Sorry I'm late, but I just noticed this.


You said mine was more litotes than euphemism. I had to go look up a definiton of litotes, which I read but I still don't think I know what it is.


I had to look it up too, so for anyone else whose first experience with this word is this post:
Litote: A figure of speech consisting of an understatement in which an affirmative is expressed by negating its opposite.
03/13/2012 08:02:06 PM · #8
Originally posted by mike_311:

And the blue in the ARTROTFL challenge is anywhere close to his style, But who's keeping track?

I guess there's room for interpretation in a lot of the challenges, but a euphemism is pretty concrete. It either is or isn't. Knowing that over a third of the entries were not euphemisms was kind of bothersome. It either suggests the entrant simply didn't care or know what's a euphemism.

CS
03/13/2012 08:04:09 PM · #9
Originally posted by cosmicassassin:

It either suggests the entrant simply didn't care or know what's a euphemism.

And neither did the voters. ;-)
03/13/2012 08:04:46 PM · #10
Originally posted by sfalice:

Originally posted by PennyStreet:

Originally posted by posthumous:

Did anyone else notice that the red and yellow ribbons in the euphemism challenge aren't euphemisms? Sorry I'm late, but I just noticed this.


You said mine was more litotes than euphemism. I had to go look up a definiton of litotes, which I read but I still don't think I know what it is.


I had to look it up too, so for anyone else whose first experience with this word is this post:
Litote: A figure of speech consisting of an understatement in which an affirmative is expressed by negating its opposite.


Mine is definitely that but the definition of Euphemism says "the act or an example of substituting a mild, indirect, or vague term for one considered harsh, blunt, or offensive".

Arguably the former is a bit more specific, but I think they both fit. Maybe. IMO. Ha!
03/13/2012 08:21:48 PM · #11
Originally posted by PennyStreet:

Originally posted by sfalice:

Originally posted by PennyStreet:

Originally posted by posthumous:

Did anyone else notice that the red and yellow ribbons in the euphemism challenge aren't euphemisms? Sorry I'm late, but I just noticed this.


You said mine was more litotes than euphemism. I had to go look up a definiton of litotes, which I read but I still don't think I know what it is.


I had to look it up too, so for anyone else whose first experience with this word is this post:
Litote: A figure of speech consisting of an understatement in which an affirmative is expressed by negating its opposite.


Mine is definitely that but the definition of Euphemism says "the act or an example of substituting a mild, indirect, or vague term for one considered harsh, blunt, or offensive".

Arguably the former is a bit more specific, but I think they both fit. Maybe. IMO. Ha!


LOl - yeah, that fits. the one I was trying to find something for (but ran out of time) was:
"He didn't have a patio to pace in." Now, that's euphemistic!
03/13/2012 08:25:44 PM · #12
Originally posted by PennyStreet:

Originally posted by sfalice:

Originally posted by PennyStreet:

Originally posted by posthumous:

Did anyone else notice that the red and yellow ribbons in the euphemism challenge aren't euphemisms? Sorry I'm late, but I just noticed this.


You said mine was more litotes than euphemism. I had to go look up a definiton of litotes, which I read but I still don't think I know what it is.


I had to look it up too, so for anyone else whose first experience with this word is this post:
Litote: A figure of speech consisting of an understatement in which an affirmative is expressed by negating its opposite.


Mine is definitely that but the definition of Euphemism says "the act or an example of substituting a mild, indirect, or vague term for one considered harsh, blunt, or offensive".

Arguably the former is a bit more specific, but I think they both fit. Maybe. IMO. Ha!


You're right, but I couldn't resist saying litotes.
03/13/2012 08:38:05 PM · #13
Originally posted by JamesDowning:

I'm pretty sure the yellow ribbon is one...


I thought so too!

Originally posted by cosmicassassin:

I guess there's room for interpretation in a lot of the challenges, but a euphemism is pretty concrete. It either is or isn't. Knowing that over a third of the entries were not euphemisms was kind of bothersome. It either suggests the entrant simply didn't care or know what's a euphemism.

CS


Or it means you are looking at it from a literal point of view.
03/13/2012 09:13:24 PM · #14
Originally posted by sinistral_leo:

Originally posted by JamesDowning:

I'm pretty sure the yellow ribbon is one...


I thought so too!



It's pretty much the opposite of a euphemism.
03/13/2012 09:25:43 PM · #15
Originally posted by posthumous:

Originally posted by sinistral_leo:

Originally posted by JamesDowning:

I'm pretty sure the yellow ribbon is one...


I thought so too!



It's pretty much the opposite of a euphemism.


How so? Penny kindly gave us this definition of a euphemism: "the act or an example of substituting a mild, indirect, or vague term for one considered harsh, blunt, or offensive".

I would've thought saying "bust a nut" is a vague and indirect way of saying what that image actually referred to, no?
03/13/2012 09:42:42 PM · #16
I thought all of the top three could be considered euphemisms by the definition provided previously: "the act or an example of substituting a mild, indirect, or vague term for one considered harsh, blunt, or offensive". I suppose it could depend slightly on your definition of mild/indirect language versus harsh/blunt language.

Kick the bucket: mild, indirect, or vague term for to die.
Stepping Stone: mild, indirect, or vague term for a job position that is bad or below your skill level that you are using only to get ahead.
Bust a nut : mild, indirect, or vague term for ejaculation.

03/13/2012 09:43:07 PM · #17
Originally posted by posthumous:

Originally posted by PennyStreet:

Originally posted by sfalice:

Originally posted by PennyStreet:

Originally posted by posthumous:

Did anyone else notice that the red and yellow ribbons in the euphemism challenge aren't euphemisms? Sorry I'm late, but I just noticed this.


You said mine was more litotes than euphemism. I had to go look up a definiton of litotes, which I read but I still don't think I know what it is.


I had to look it up too, so for anyone else whose first experience with this word is this post:
Litote: A figure of speech consisting of an understatement in which an affirmative is expressed by negating its opposite.


Mine is definitely that but the definition of Euphemism says "the act or an example of substituting a mild, indirect, or vague term for one considered harsh, blunt, or offensive".

Arguably the former is a bit more specific, but I think they both fit. Maybe. IMO. Ha!


You're right, but I couldn't resist saying litotes.


Isn't DPC a great place for furthering our educations? (I had to look it up too.)
03/13/2012 09:48:24 PM · #18
Originally posted by nstevens85:

I thought all of the top three could be considered euphemisms by the definition provided previously: "the act or an example of substituting a mild, indirect, or vague term for one considered harsh, blunt, or offensive". I suppose it could depend slightly on your definition of mild/indirect language versus harsh/blunt language.

Kick the bucket: mild, indirect, or vague term for to die.
Stepping Stone: mild, indirect, or vague term for a job position that is bad or below your skill level that you are using only to get ahead.
Bust a nut : mild, indirect, or vague term for ejaculation.


you're right about the blue ribbon.

"stepping stone" is a neutral metaphor to describe how you are using something, whether it's a job or something else.

"busting a nut" is a harsh, violent metaphor: the opposite of a euphemism.
03/13/2012 09:49:06 PM · #19
Originally posted by jomari:

Originally posted by posthumous:



You're right, but I couldn't resist saying litotes.


Isn't DPC a great place for furthering our educations? (I had to look it up too.)


Yup, I love learning new words.
03/13/2012 09:52:58 PM · #20
I think that the blue is a euphemism for death (which is an uncomfortable topic).

I think the Yellow is a euphemism for hurting one's testicles (which is an uncomfortable topic, although I do not have any, so it's not so uncomfortable for me).

I think the Red is not a euphemism at all. BUT... enough people did to give it a ribbon.

And so... I'm okay with that.
03/13/2012 09:55:59 PM · #21
Originally posted by posthumous:

Originally posted by nstevens85:

I thought all of the top three could be considered euphemisms by the definition provided previously: "the act or an example of substituting a mild, indirect, or vague term for one considered harsh, blunt, or offensive". I suppose it could depend slightly on your definition of mild/indirect language versus harsh/blunt language.

Kick the bucket: mild, indirect, or vague term for to die.
Stepping Stone: mild, indirect, or vague term for a job position that is bad or below your skill level that you are using only to get ahead.
Bust a nut : mild, indirect, or vague term for ejaculation.


you're right about the blue ribbon.

"stepping stone" is a neutral metaphor to describe how you are using something, whether it's a job or something else.

"busting a nut" is a harsh, violent metaphor: the opposite of a euphemism.


I can see your perspective on the the red/yellow. I did happen to see them included with online lists when searching euphemisms. So i would guess many just pulled them from online lists.

But math is more my thing.. not language.. :)

EDIT: to fix quote order

Message edited by author 2012-03-13 22:05:53.
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