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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> Just Alittle Help From My Friends...PLEASE
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05/10/2013 09:32:59 AM · #1
I have been ask to take photos of a civil war ball. I am no photographer at all but the photographer they had, her mother died suddenly and they didn't have much of a choice other than to ask me. I am not getting paid to do this. My question is (answers in as simple terms as possible please) the building has MANY flouresent lights. The room is about 25x30 ft. plywood like walls, white ceilings, several big windows. The event will take place 6:00-11:00 p.m. It will still be daylight (with rain) till about 8:30.Any help would be GREATLY appreciated! OH, and they would like some portrait shots also. I have 2 cameras so I can set one on a tripod for that. HOW DO I GET MYSELF IN THESE MESSES!!!!!! What I am really worried about is the lighting, I think I will be ok with the rest.I am going out today around 4:00 to look it over.

Message edited by author 2013-05-10 09:40:25.
05/10/2013 09:55:10 AM · #2
You will do fine....
05/10/2013 10:08:28 AM · #3
Thanks,I hope you are right! I am glad they just " want some pictures"
05/10/2013 10:26:28 AM · #4
Can you shoot in RAW and jpg? I am guessing that no matter what you set your camera to, you will be glad to have WB choices when you convert.
05/10/2013 11:06:07 AM · #5
get in there a little early. If they're super old school fluorescent lights, you might have to deal with a slight green cast. You can get a grey reading and balance out your subjects for a quick fix or experiment with gelled flash (i rarely get to use my window green - but it might be useful to have handy).

If shooting all natural light, then just use the greycard option - shoot Raw if possible. Indoor stuff sometimes needs you to lift some shadows and raw along with temp control is good for that.

if using flash for portraits, either overpower the lights entirely - or gel to match color temps. If neither option is possible then get the flash in close to the important parts of the subject and let only the background get whatever the falloff color cast is - not a great option, but its better than nothing. get your iso pumped up a bit so your exposure is about -1 to -2 ev and fill in with flash.

Try not to use direct on camera hard flash. Use either a softbox, an umbrella or for moving around a smaller on flash modifier if possible. If not, use a small black foam sheet to flag your flash head a bit and to allow your flash to bounce off the white surfaces in a way that they provide you with that 1 stop of fill- i personally try to use directional light in that way when possible for events.

Take into account that people move at events. Set your shutter speed to account for that (even if you have shake-reduction). At a ball - you'll have some opportunity i assume to shoot some dance, experiment with shutter drag on your flash if you feel confident with the rest. Don't be afraid of getting a bit close to the subjects if you have to - that's your job.

I hope this helps!

don't try to do everything, pick a method - take some test shots, if it works, try to stick close to those settings and things should go smoothly. Always note when the lighting conditions change significantly so you can make adjustments as necessary. Indoors - i try to expose just a bit more than i do normally. Two reasons, shadows aren't as stark, and grain from mid-high iso isn't as bad when the scene is well lit (shadows look worse imo at high iso).

edit: from someone way more experienced than I florescent lighting

Message edited by author 2013-05-10 11:10:23.
05/10/2013 11:27:50 AM · #6
to piggy back, if you aren't overpowering the light watch your shutter speeds. florescents work on a 60Hz cycle (in the US, im not sure if its different elsewhere), meaning if your shutter isn't at a multiple of 60 (1/60, 1/120) you will get even lighting results as it takes a full 1/60 of a second to capture the whole wave.

they also make gels specifically to match the green hue. shoot raw and color correct in post or convert to black and white :)
05/10/2013 12:09:55 PM · #7
Originally posted by nam:

Can you shoot in RAW and jpg? I am guessing that no matter what you set your camera to, you will be glad to have WB choices when you convert.


Best advice you'll get in this thread.
05/10/2013 03:29:12 PM · #8
Thanks everyone! I knew I could count on you guys for some good advice. If ( with fingers crossed) some turn out fair,I will post some later. Thanks again
05/10/2013 03:53:27 PM · #9
Best and most versatile is to use a flash not directly on camera. you can get a coiled cord hot shoe extension and still use TTL to automatically set the flash. Fill Flash mode is great for stopping motion and low light. Look in your manual for setting the flash to fire at the "End" of the shutter exposure. On my camera a "Lightning bolt" and the word "Rear" apear on the Top-LCD Display. You can choose from several modes.

If you know the temperature of the Flourescent light you may me able to set your "White Balance" to "Kelvin" temperature or light color. In my office I use 5000K bright white flourescent lights. They come in about 5 common temperatures such as 3000K, etc.
You can set it to any white balance setting when using a flash for f/x. Shoot a Gray card or have someone hold a white sheet of paper in the room and use that for setting the white balnance to that, in Photoshop or Lightroom.
I always shoot RAW + JPG Fine. Nkon's .NEF raw files allow more leeway or latitude in adjustments to fine tune later.

If you shooting without a flash, that can be done, too. Mine shoots decently at 10,000 ISO, with "Noise" cleanup in Lightroom. Yours goes up to 25,000 ISO. With Flash things are even sharper.

You can learn the "New features" I found on reviews
"Spot white balance in live view mode"
"There are a few completely new features that debut on the Nikon D7100, too. One of these is Spot White Balance, which lets you set the camera’s white balance for the whole scene from picking just one area of the scene"
05/10/2013 03:53:27 PM · #10
Best and most versatile is to use a flash not directly on camera. you can get a coiled cord hot shoe extension and still use TTL to automatically set the flash. Fill Flash mode is great for stopping motion and low light. Look in your manual for setting the flash to fire at the "End" of the shutter exposure. On my camera a "Lightning bolt" and the word "Rear" apear on the Top-LCD Display. You can choose from several modes.

"Rear" means "Rear Curtain Synch". It's referring to the shutter curtain of the "Miniature Theatre in side your camera" :-)

If you know the temperature of the Flourescent light you may me able to set your "White Balance" to "Kelvin" temperature or light color. In my office I use 5000K bright white flourescent lights. They come in about 5 common temperatures such as 3000K, etc.
You can set it to any white balance setting when using a flash for f/x. Shoot a Gray card or have someone hold a white sheet of paper in the room and use that for setting the white balnance to that, in Photoshop or Lightroom.
I always shoot RAW + JPG Fine. Nkon's .NEF raw files allow more leeway or latitude in adjustments to fine tune later.

If you shooting without a flash, that can be done, too. Mine shoots decently at 10,000 ISO, with "Noise" cleanup in Lightroom. Yours goes up to 25,000 ISO. With Flash things are even sharper.

You can learn the "New features" I found on reviews
"Spot white balance in live view mode"
"There are a few completely new features that debut on the Nikon D7100, too. One of these is Spot White Balance, which lets you set the camera’s white balance for the whole scene from picking just one area of the scene"

Message edited by author 2013-05-10 16:11:26.
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