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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Wide angles advice please
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09/01/2013 06:31:51 AM · #1
I just bought a new Canon 6D with/ 24-105 and got A 50mm/1.4 lens

I need a very low cost wide angles hopefully not a fish-eye. No need to be auto focus just a good lens

Any ideas please
09/01/2013 06:51:22 AM · #2
Samyang 14mm.

You won't find anything better for that price.
09/01/2013 07:07:08 AM · #3
Originally posted by Alexkc:

Samyang 14mm.

You won't find anything better for that price.


THANKS,I will look it :)

What do you think of this

Rokinon FE14M-C 14mm F2.8 Ultra Wide Lens for Canon (Black)
09/01/2013 07:20:48 AM · #4
Originally posted by HighNooner:



What do you think of this

Rokinon FE14M-C 14mm F2.8 Ultra Wide Lens for Canon (Black)


The Rokinon lenses are the same as the Samyang. They just use a handful of different brand names for some reason. Exactly the same lens though.
09/01/2013 07:22:00 AM · #5
Originally posted by HighNooner:

Originally posted by Alexkc:

Samyang 14mm.

You won't find anything better for that price.


THANKS,I will look it :)

What do you think of this

Rokinon FE14M-C 14mm F2.8 Ultra Wide Lens for Canon (Black)


Rokinon and Samyang are the same stuff under a different name.
09/01/2013 07:33:22 AM · #6
Originally posted by HighNooner:

Originally posted by Alexkc:

Samyang 14mm.

You won't find anything better for that price.


THANKS,I will look it :)

What do you think of this

Rokinon FE14M-C 14mm F2.8 Ultra Wide Lens for Canon (Black)


Bower Super-Wide 14mm T/3.1 Digital Cine Lens for Canon SLR Camera

This is not the same, right? What's with T/3.1
09/01/2013 07:46:18 AM · #7
Video version. But the same lens. It has a fluid ring to change the aperture.
09/01/2013 11:27:58 AM · #8
Originally posted by HighNooner:

...What's with T/3.1


T is for transmittance. It's how cine lenses are rated. T is similar to f, but takes into account light loss in the lens, so it has an aperture of f/2.8, but loses some light to internal scattering and reflection and is therefore T/3.1.
09/01/2013 11:46:06 AM · #9
Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by HighNooner:

...What's with T/3.1


T is for transmittance. It's how cine lenses are rated. T is similar to f, but takes into account light loss in the lens, so it has an aperture of f/2.8, but loses some light to internal scattering and reflection and is therefore T/3.1.

Is that why video lenses are often fluorite -- better transmission ratio? And part of the higher cost of L-series lenses and such?
09/01/2013 11:56:19 AM · #10
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by HighNooner:

...What's with T/3.1


T is for transmittance. It's how cine lenses are rated. T is similar to f, but takes into account light loss in the lens, so it has an aperture of f/2.8, but loses some light to internal scattering and reflection and is therefore T/3.1.

Is that why video lenses are often fluorite -- better transmission ratio? And part of the higher cost of L-series lenses and such?


Not sure about the relationship with fluorite. Higher cost, yes, that's correlated, because a lot of the effort in increasing transmittance goes into reduction of internal reflection, which means more coatings and more expensive multi-layer coatings on more surfaces.
09/01/2013 11:59:13 AM · #11
It's more about the coatings than the composition of the glass itself?
09/01/2013 12:08:59 PM · #12
Originally posted by GeneralE:

It's more about the coatings than the composition of the glass itself?


Yes, I'd say that's accurate. Most scattering and reflection occurs at optical surfaces, and the only way to reduce them is coatings, or reduction in the number of surfaces. Some glasses are more transparent than others, of course so the glass does have a role.
09/01/2013 02:03:15 PM · #13
Fritz do you think there are big differences in shooting videos with the photo version of the lens and viceversa?

Since I'm a videomaker I'd like to buy the video version but I don't know if it can have problems taking photos.
09/01/2013 03:26:49 PM · #14
You know, I really doubt that there is any difference in the optical construction, though I have no direct knowledge, so take that for whatever it's worth. The only downside I can really see is that I don't think you'd have "click stops" at the traditional f-stop locations. No biggie. I have a lens like that (Zeiss 75/1.5 Biotar), and it's really not an issue for me.

ETA, confirmed, the optical formula is the same, the only real differences are the absence of click stops on aperture ring, the markings in T instead of f, and the presence of the follow-focus gearing on the aperture and focus rings.
According to reviews it's not in the league of the Canon 14/2.8, but it does get positive reviews. There may be significant sample variation, that's not unusual for a lens like this.

Message edited by author 2013-09-01 15:35:10.
09/02/2013 12:57:27 AM · #15
Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by GeneralE:

It's more about the coatings than the composition of the glass itself?


Some glasses are more transparent than others, of course so the glass does have a role.


Certainly true, L stands for low dispersion glass and it's not only the coating.

I ordered the lens and hopefully I will have something positive to report.
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