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DPChallenge Forums >> Current Challenge >> Contre-jour Same as silhouettes?
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06/27/2014 03:11:39 AM · #1
Originally posted by EstimatedEyes:

Originally posted by Tiny:

Contre jour / Silhouettes its the same difference .

Shoot into the light, that's it.

What he said. Only difference is that a contre jour can include a silhouette, it just doesn't have to.


Yes, my point exactly. Just shoot into the light. Silhouettes are just one of the possible results.

06/26/2014 07:22:14 PM · #2
Originally posted by GeorgesBogaert:

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This is the type of photo I want to shoot for this challenge but not sure if it meets the challenge of contre jour.


Yes Spot on.
06/26/2014 07:20:34 PM · #3
[quote=Tiny] Contre jour / Silhouettes its the same difference .

Shoot into the light, that's it. [/quote

No not the same. Contre Joure is used to produce a ring of light behing the subject and to even out the light in front, normally fill flash is used to even up the lighting.

Wedding photographers down here use Contre Jour lighting to even out the High contrast of a Blue sky wedding in the height of summer to negate the harsh shadows cast by the sun.
06/26/2014 01:10:12 PM · #4
Originally posted by Tiny:

Contre jour / Silhouettes its the same difference .

Shoot into the light, that's it.

What he said. Only difference is that a contre jour can include a silhouette, it just doesn't have to.
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06/26/2014 12:31:11 PM · #5
To help keep peoples' "juices flowing" here is an image of mine from a few years back that is contre-jour, without any silhouetting, and with the light sources not being natural.

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06/26/2014 12:20:24 PM · #6
Have to Laugh at my stupid self... ran all over the place looking up contre-jour, saw this thread, clicked on the last challenge, and duhhhh I got a TT in it.. well slap me silly n call me stoopid....
06/26/2014 12:18:28 PM · #7
Contre jour / Silhouettes its the same difference .

Shoot into the light, that's it.
06/26/2014 12:18:13 PM · #8
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This is what I took of my daughter last summer... I was playing with my point and shoot and caught her climbing the tree..this is prob the closest what I had which may come close to this challenge..I just turned it black and white (in my camera).. no extra editing to this

She was not posing for me.. she hates her picture taken

Message edited by author 2014-06-26 12:20:36.
06/26/2014 12:01:13 PM · #9
I had always thought of contre-jour as rim lighting - a really hard technique to get right, but so effective.
06/26/2014 11:52:21 AM · #10
Originally posted by GeorgesBogaert:

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This is the type of photo I want to shoot for this challenge but not sure if it meets the challenge of contre jour.


Between These pictures and Neil's Picture, this is what I am thinking about something along those lines..
I like seeing the details of the pictures

tanguera- thank you
06/26/2014 11:51:17 AM · #11
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06/26/2014 11:44:51 AM · #12
The main difference for me is that contre jour generally gives the subject an aura/glow around the edges, and can include detail in the subject itself, whereas silhouette is a sharper edged, completely or almost completely black shape. This is not a technical description - it's how I differentiate the two techniques.
06/26/2014 11:43:20 AM · #13
Originally posted by Cory:

Originally posted by nam:

Originally posted by Mike:

from wikipedia:
. . . Silhouetting occurs when there is a lighting ratio of 16:1 or more; at lower ratios such as 8:1 the result is instead called low-key lighting.[


I realize that you took this from wikipedia, Mike, but do you understand and can you explain how one would determine a lighting ratio?


Easy enough, that is a 4 stop difference, or a 16x difference (1-2=1 stop 2-4=2 stops 4-8=3 stops 8-16=4 stops)

So, just expose your background at a middle gray at say 1/320, and your foreground should then be at 1/40 or so for a middle gray. That would be a silhouette. For a 'low key' result, then you'd want 1/80 for the middle gray on your foreground/subject.

Make sense?


OOO MGGGG Cory, that just went over my head with the stop thing LOLOL!

I just started DLSR in Dec.. I haven't even touched that yet, just learned what the meanings of the M,A,S,P just meant on my camera

This challenge is gonna give me a quick crash course I feel LOL!

Message edited by author 2014-06-26 11:46:38.
06/26/2014 11:36:06 AM · #14
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This is the type of photo I want to shoot for this challenge but not sure if it meets the challenge of contre jour.
06/26/2014 11:19:44 AM · #15
Originally posted by GeorgesBogaert:

Taking a picture of a person in front of the sun but using a flash. Does it count as Contre-jour?

Yup, although the ratio of backlight to fill light should leave it clear the subject IS backlit...
06/26/2014 11:11:50 AM · #16
Taking a picture of a person in front of the sun but using a flash. Does it count as Contre-jour?
06/26/2014 10:54:06 AM · #17
Originally posted by Neil:

Non-sillouette image but I presume this qualifies as Contre-jour:

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What do you think?


Contre-jour for sure.

Here's another one from my collection.

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06/26/2014 10:52:43 AM · #18
Originally posted by Neil:

Non-sillouette image but I presume this qualifies as Contre-jour:

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What do you think?


I would consider it Contre-jour and give it a 9.
Because that's what I gave it the last time. :)

06/26/2014 10:52:37 AM · #19
Originally posted by Neil:

Non-sillouette image but I presume this qualifies as Contre-jour:

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What do you think?

Absolutely. In fact, that's classic contre jour. Typically, speaking of painting (where the term originated) contre jour was rarely focused on silhouettes per se, but rather on a subject floating backlit in a strongly luminous or intensely modeled surround. That's what you have here pretty much.
06/26/2014 10:52:03 AM · #20
Originally posted by nam:

Originally posted by Mike:

from wikipedia:
. . . Silhouetting occurs when there is a lighting ratio of 16:1 or more; at lower ratios such as 8:1 the result is instead called low-key lighting.[


I realize that you took this from wikipedia, Mike, but do you understand and can you explain how one would determine a lighting ratio?


Easy enough, that is a 4 stop difference, or a 16x difference (1-2=1 stop 2-4=2 stops 4-8=3 stops 8-16=4 stops)

So, just expose your background at a middle gray at say 1/320, and your foreground should then be at 1/40 or so for a middle gray. That would be a silhouette. For a 'low key' result, then you'd want 1/80 for the middle gray on your foreground/subject.

Make sense?
06/26/2014 10:46:59 AM · #21
Non-sillouette image but I presume this qualifies as Contre-jour:

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What do you think?
06/26/2014 10:44:55 AM · #22
Originally posted by nam:

Originally posted by Mike:

from wikipedia:
. . . Silhouetting occurs when there is a lighting ratio of 16:1 or more; at lower ratios such as 8:1 the result is instead called low-key lighting.[


I realize that you took this from wikipedia, Mike, but do you understand and can you explain how one would determine a lighting ratio?


You realize that wikipedia has a lot of stuff, right.

Once again, from wikipedia: Lighting Ratio ... The ratio can be determined in relation to F stops since each increase in f-stop is equal double the amount of light: 2 to the power of the difference in f stops is equal to the first factor in the ratio. For example, a difference in two f-stops between key and fill is 2 squared, or 4:1 ratio. A difference in 3 stops is 2 cubed, or an 8:1 ratio. No difference is equal to 2 to the power of 0, for a 1:1 ratio.

Meter the source, meter the subject. 8:1 would be 3 stops (2 to the 3rd power). 16:1 would be 4 stops (2 to the 4th power).

Message edited by author 2014-06-26 10:45:13.
06/26/2014 10:13:10 AM · #23
Originally posted by Mike:

from wikipedia:
. . . Silhouetting occurs when there is a lighting ratio of 16:1 or more; at lower ratios such as 8:1 the result is instead called low-key lighting.[


I realize that you took this from wikipedia, Mike, but do you understand and can you explain how one would determine a lighting ratio?
06/26/2014 09:19:52 AM · #24
Originally posted by Mike:

from wikipedia:

Contre-jour (French for "against daylight") is a photographic technique in which the camera is pointing directly toward a source of light.

Contre-jour produces backlighting of the subject. This effect usually hides details, causes a stronger contrast between light and dark, creates silhouettes and emphasizes lines and shapes. The sun, or other light source, is often seen as either a bright spot or as a strong glare behind the subject.[1] Fill light may be used to illuminate the side of the subject facing toward the camera. Silhouetting occurs when there is a lighting ratio of 16:1 or more; at lower ratios such as 8:1 the result is instead called low-key lighting.[


+1 Thanks!
06/26/2014 07:46:33 AM · #25
from wikipedia:

Contre-jour (French for "against daylight") is a photographic technique in which the camera is pointing directly toward a source of light.

Contre-jour produces backlighting of the subject. This effect usually hides details, causes a stronger contrast between light and dark, creates silhouettes and emphasizes lines and shapes. The sun, or other light source, is often seen as either a bright spot or as a strong glare behind the subject.[1] Fill light may be used to illuminate the side of the subject facing toward the camera. Silhouetting occurs when there is a lighting ratio of 16:1 or more; at lower ratios such as 8:1 the result is instead called low-key lighting.[
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