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DPChallenge Forums >> Current Challenge >> What are the secondary colors?
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07/19/2014 11:51:25 PM · #1
Shall I just take purple, orange and green as the challenge description suggest or ...?
According to a (becoming) predominant info source, Wikipedia:

//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secondary_color

The options are quite arbitrary...
07/20/2014 05:10:45 AM · #2
It has a pretty specific meaning if you look at a color wheel. Find the mixture of 50% of two adjacent primary colors on the wheel to derive the secondary triadic. You get orange, purple and green. Sure things can get muddled if you begin to consider light or printing mixtures and you are free to imagine whatever you like, but most voters will not be confused.

Look at the primary color challenges of the past, CMY and RGB are not what were considered primaries, and secondaries based on them will not be seen as meeting this challenge.
07/20/2014 09:43:29 AM · #3
Don't mix up Primary Colors, Secondary Colors and Tertiary Colors. (No Pun) They are all clearly separate and WELL defined.

If you've ever taken any kind of art class it's a pretty strict color wheel...like ' . substr('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21_N.gif', strrpos('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21_N.gif', '/') + 1) . ' BrennanOB said.

And the Challenge description says...

"Mix any two primary colors, and you'll get a secondary color -- purple, orange, or green. Now, take a photograph with one or more secondary colors as the focus of your photograph."

You picture doesn't have to have all 3.

When we had the Primary Color Challenge someone argued that green was a primary color...ishhhhh

Look at the color wheel you will have your answer.
07/20/2014 10:17:12 AM · #4
Fair enough:-)

Thanks

Originally posted by Ja-9:

Don't mix up Primary Colors, Secondary Colors and Tertiary Colors. (No Pun) They are all clearly separate and WELL defined.

If you've ever taken any kind of art class it's a pretty strict color wheel...like ' . substr('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21_N.gif', strrpos('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21_N.gif', '/') + 1) . ' BrennanOB said.

And the Challenge description says...

"Mix any two primary colors, and you'll get a secondary color -- purple, orange, or green. Now, take a photograph with one or more secondary colors as the focus of your photograph."

You picture doesn't have to have all 3.

When we had the Primary Color Challenge someone argued that green was a primary color...ishhhhh

Look at the color wheel you will have your answer.
07/20/2014 01:12:32 PM · #5
Shades of Purple, for example. There isn't just one color of purple. So any purple you enter will be wrong, because it won't be what's expected, by just about everyone. The results of this challenge ought to be interesting & frustrating, for just about everyone who enters.

It depends on which red and which blue you start with. And it depends on the proportions. One dab of red paint + two dabs of blue = a different color of purple than two dabs of red paint + one dab of blue. The original purple was derived from mollusks, not created by mixing pure primary colors.

Message edited by author 2014-07-20 13:28:38.
07/20/2014 01:18:02 PM · #6
Originally posted by pixelpig:

The results of this challenge ought to be interesting & frustrating, for just about everyone who enters.

Just like every other challenge ... ;-)

One of my favorite "art" pieces was an 8x10 frame on display at the printing industries museum in San Francisco which contained dozens of 1" squares of paper, each of which had been printed with 100% black ink, and each of which was a different color.
07/20/2014 01:32:10 PM · #7
Originally posted by GeneralE:

... dozens of 1" squares of paper, each of which had been printed with 100% black ink, and each of which was a different color.


And black is the worst -- or the most interesting. Color theory is one thing--in the real world there are no pure colors. I think if you pay attention to the numbers, you could get a true purple on your computer monitor & also define it absolutely. The computer uses additive color, though, where the primary colors are RGB. If we were so inclined, this challenge could spark an interesting discussion. And maybe it will, after voting concludes. Maybe not.

Message edited by author 2014-07-20 13:44:38.
07/20/2014 01:32:36 PM · #8
Purple-ish. Orange-ish. Green-ish.

Some combination of one or more of these shades should make most voters happy.

Those who nitpick and argue beyond that are not worth your consideration.
07/20/2014 01:33:04 PM · #9
Originally posted by ShaneBlake:

Purple-ish. Orange-ish. Green-ish.

Some combination of one or more of these shades should make most voters happy.

Those who nitpick and argue beyond that are not worth your consideration.


+1
07/20/2014 01:43:34 PM · #10
Originally posted by ShaneBlake:

Purple-ish. Orange-ish. Green-ish.

Some combination of one or more of these shades should make most voters happy.

Those who nitpick and argue beyond that are not worth your consideration.


Some of those nitpickers will be voting while they're nitpicking. And some of them will be complaining after voting ends.

And if purple-ish is good enough for you, then good for you. I hope you're going to be voting.
07/20/2014 02:55:42 PM · #11
THESE ARE THE SECONDARY COLORS: ' . substr('//www.color-wheel-artist.com/images/color-wheel-secondary.jpg', strrpos('//www.color-wheel-artist.com/images/color-wheel-secondary.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

By comparison, these are the primary colors: ' . substr('//www.color-wheel-artist.com/images/color-wheel-primary.jpg', strrpos('//www.color-wheel-artist.com/images/color-wheel-primary.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

Finally, these are the Tertiary colors: ' . substr('//www.color-wheel-artist.com/images/color-wheel-tertiary.jpg', strrpos('//www.color-wheel-artist.com/images/color-wheel-tertiary.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

You get a SECONDARY color by mixing two PRIMARY colors.You get a TERTIARY color by mixing a PRIMARY with either of its neighboring SECONDARY colors.

***********************

So, for people who are schooled in color theory, there's a solid basis for nit-picking. Stray too far from a "true" secondary color and you become a tertiary color. Me, I'm not gonna stress on it, but who knows...?

Message edited by author 2014-07-20 14:59:03.
07/20/2014 03:01:21 PM · #12
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

So, for people who are schooled in color theory ...

Perhaps ironically, in Photoshop I rely almost exclusively on the measurements of the SUBTRACTIVE colors (CMYK*) in the info window to know what I'm looking at ... being one of the 10% or so of males with some formm of color-blindness I rely on those readings more than on what I see on the monitor.

Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Black
C+M = Blue
C+Y = Green
M+Y = Red
C+M+Y = Black

Message edited by author 2014-07-20 15:03:13.
07/20/2014 04:10:45 PM · #13
Hex triplet #800080
sRGBB (r, g, b) (128, 0, 128)
CMYKH (c, m, y, k) (66, 87, 0, 0)
HSV (h, s, v) (300°, 100%, 50.2%)
Source HTML/CSS[14]

Or, you could do it by the numbers, equal amounts of red and blue in RGB, a 66/87 combination of cyan and magenta in CMYK.

What happens to purple when you Save for Web?

[eta]
Just to be clear--I think the challenge is more about finding an interesting composition with a secondary color-ish in it than it is about achieving an exact color. I just like to wonder about stuff.

Message edited by author 2014-07-20 16:16:12.
07/20/2014 09:58:06 PM · #14
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

. . .

Finally, these are the Tertiary colors: ' . substr('//www.color-wheel-artist.com/images/color-wheel-tertiary.jpg', strrpos('//www.color-wheel-artist.com/images/color-wheel-tertiary.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

You get a SECONDARY color by mixing two PRIMARY colors.You get a TERTIARY color by mixing a PRIMARY with either of its neighboring SECONDARY colors.

***********************

So, for people who are schooled in color theory, there's a solid basis for nit-picking. Stray too far from a "true" secondary color and you become a tertiary color. Me, I'm not gonna stress on it, but who knows...?


And when we do the Tertiary Color challenge, could it be Minimal? I kept thinking as I was shooting and looking for subjects "this should be in Minimal".

Message edited by author 2014-07-20 21:58:40.
07/20/2014 10:45:41 PM · #15
LOL Should be interesting indeed.. with me being somewhat color blind, i have a very hard time finding shades..
Purples look like black to me.. lol Oranges look like yellow to me..
I had to have my kids be my seeing eye because there are different shades of things.. ppl can nit pick all they want too LOL bring it on
07/20/2014 11:17:58 PM · #16
I was wondering. It states that the color should be the focus of your image. Does that mean that the image has to be of something that is totally your color of choice, or......can your color of choice be in the picture on something for instance?
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