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07/29/2002 01:50:58 AM · #1
"Something Old. ''Use your photographic technique to emphasize the age of your subject."

Does this mean we should be using grainy B&W and Sepia Tone effects on old things to make the photos look like they came from an attic?

* This message has been edited by the author on 7/29/2002 1:51:17 AM.
07/29/2002 02:02:12 AM · #2
I would have to say that it is up to you, take a picture of anything old. Just do what you like the rest will fall into place.
07/29/2002 02:30:49 AM · #3
I thinks B&W, Sephiha, Grains, ect will be overused, and or not used wisely... mine will be a full color submission, beauty of wood ;)
07/29/2002 09:47:18 AM · #4
I would think any sort of grain would be a filter, and thus not allowed. I bet we will see a lot of B&W and sepia though. I plan on using B&W or sepia if it fits the image. I'm very excited about this challange. There is a lot more "stuff" here that is old, than "stuff" that is "corporate"

Brian
07/29/2002 09:54:31 AM · #5
Is sepia allowed?
07/29/2002 10:07:08 AM · #6
Sepia can be done with DPChallenge legal modifications.

The quick and dirty way to get Sepia in Photoshop is to open up the Hue/Saturation adjustment tool, click the 'Colorize' checkbox in the lower right-hand corner, and then change the Hue to somewhere around 28.

Also, "grain" can be added in camera by boosting your camera's ISO.
07/29/2002 10:10:57 AM · #7
Thanks for the info. I knew about the ISO but not the color adjustment.
07/29/2002 10:16:53 AM · #8
Originally posted by sohr:
Sepia can be done with DPChallenge legal modifications.

The quick and dirty way to get Sepia in Photoshop is to open up the Hue/Saturation adjustment tool, click the 'Colorize' checkbox in the lower right-hand corner, and then change the Hue to somewhere around 28.

Also, "grain" can be added in camera by boosting your camera's ISO.


That works, you can also do it with duotoning/quadtoning. Gordon McGregor wrote an excellent tutorial on the subject, but I don't have the link handy. Gordon?

-Terry
07/29/2002 10:26:53 AM · #9
why does that sound more difficult and involved to me?
07/29/2002 02:40:20 PM · #10
Ok, I''m going to try and revive this thread because I''d really like some feedback here.

I am a bit befuddled on where this challenge is supposed to lead. And so I quote: ''Use your photographic technique to emphasize the age of your subject.''

To me, this would seem to indicate that its not only ok, but desirable (to help meet the challenge) to use some combination of techniques to make the photo look old. A lot can be done in camera, depending on the model, but others will need to use photoshop to get the Sepia look, grainyness, etc....

It seems to be a near contridiction of the rules as I understand them. "Post-shot Adjustments may be made to your image in a photo editing program, so long as the modification is applied to the whole image. This includes levels, b&w conversion, hue/saturation, sizing/rotating, cropping etc. However, no filters (or non-Photoshop equivalent) maybe be applied to your image with the exception of sharpen and despeckle, the two of which are allowed. Absolutely no spot-editing is allowed; the use of any type of selection tool is prohibited."

After seeing how strictly some ppl score on meeting the challenge, I don''t want to miss the mark again.

I didn''t submit for Corporate World, and I''m eager to give it another try. But I sure want to get the ground rules straight.

* This message has been edited by the author on 7/29/2002 2:40:14 PM.
07/29/2002 02:51:42 PM · #11
If you read above you will see that it is possible to creat sepia tones by using hue/saturation, and that is allowed. Also the grain (ISO). is mentioned above.
07/29/2002 02:59:38 PM · #12
True. But have you noticed how poorly grainy and or Sepia photos seem to fare...on average, that is?

Within the rules or not, it seems some ppl just don't like it. I guess what I'm really trying to determine is if folks don't like them because they think they are outside the rules, or if they plain don't like grainy, black and white, or Seipa toned photos? And most importantly, will they alter their feelings to not place such photos at a disadvantage because they conform to the challenge better!
07/29/2002 03:04:19 PM · #13
Originally posted by mcmurma:
True. But have you noticed how poorly grainy and or Sepia photos seem to fare...on average, that is?

Within the rules or not, it seems some ppl just don't like it. I guess what I'm really trying to determine is if folks don't like them because they think they are outside the rules, or if they plain don't like grainy, black and white, or Seipa toned photos? And most importantly, will they alter their feelings to not place such photos at a disadvantage because they [i]conform to the challenge better!

[/i]
Probably they won't, and I'm trying to understand why. See
this thread for details.

-Terry
07/29/2002 03:04:52 PM · #14
I for one have figured out that I can not figure out the voters at all. In the texture contest I was shocked to see how some of them placed. I thought wallpaper looks would be bad and yet ...
So I haven't a clue as to what people will vote high or low.

07/29/2002 03:05:05 PM · #15
How you take you picture all depends on how old your subject is. If you take a picture of an old lunchbox (let's say Lassie), you could do it in black and white with a little grain showing by increasing your ISO. But if you took one of The Monkees, you might want to do a color photo possibly with some grain and a little off in the tint like the old color TV's. It doesn't matter if you make these adjustments before you take the picture or in Photoshop afterwards. The rules say as long as you make the adjustments to the whole picture it's okay. If you have any doubts about a particular filter, just post to the forums or you can PM any of us Mods or Admins and we can tell you if it's okay.
07/29/2002 03:08:36 PM · #16
Her is my feeble attempt (from about 2 weeks ago) to make a shot feel older than normal.

This is the Original Color Photo

This is the Duo tone aging photo

Now, if you could take that Duo-tone and grain it up a bit I bet it would look even better for an "Old Photo Effect".

BTW, thanks to Gordon for that tutorial he wrote and his experimentation with Duo-Tones that inspired my experimentations. I never paid much attantion to Duo-Tone in the past.
07/29/2002 03:14:28 PM · #17
Thx for the response everyone. You have helped me to determine that the mind of the voter is an unfathomable thing...no sense in trying.

I guess it pays to stick with what works for you, and go into it understanding that not everyone is going to accept or like your work.
07/29/2002 03:18:08 PM · #18
Now you got it!
07/30/2002 02:01:14 AM · #19
What about in camera modes such as B&W and Sepia?
07/30/2002 02:45:32 AM · #20
Originally posted by rls_2002:
What about in camera modes such as B&W and Sepia?


What about on camera filters such as the cokin series and IR filters?
07/30/2002 03:38:48 AM · #21
Originally posted by sulamk:
Originally posted by rls_2002:
[i]What about in camera modes such as B&W and Sepia?


What about on camera filters such as the cokin series and IR filters?[/i]

I believe if you can do it with your camera it is "legal."
07/30/2002 07:59:09 AM · #22
Note it does not say how old...
07/30/2002 08:28:57 AM · #23
First camera modes and cokin filters are legal. Though some of those special effect len''s might get you in trouble ;-)
Thats if you can afford them!

"your photographic technique to emphasize the age of your subject."

Photographic technique is more than just filters and color adjustments.
For example I can take a close up of a 40 something year old and make it look like a 50-60 y.o. just by changing the lighting to emphasize the persons wrinkles... personally this would be a last ditch entry as I think there will be a few portraits,.. though about the best I have done in portraiture of non-family members is ID photo''s at work, so it might be worth it from that perspective.

Also note it says "emphasize age of you subject" NOT "emphasize age of your photo", ... which is effectivly what sepia tone does... but of course the implication is there.

Any other (more original) Idea''s for how to make things look old??

* This message has been edited by the author on 7/30/2002 8:29:13 AM.
07/30/2002 08:50:53 AM · #24
Originally posted by jeremya:

Also note it says "emphasize age of you subject" NOT "emphasize age of your photo", ... which is effectivly what sepia tone does... but of course the implication is there.


You make an interesting point. It does say subject.
I might rethink the idea of sepia.
I already shot a few things, I''m just not sure what everyone will be looking for in this one.
I guess I''ll have a ton of outtakes for critique, and as usual will pick the wrong one for submission.






* This message has been edited by the author on 7/30/2002 8:52:21 AM.
07/30/2002 09:21:18 AM · #25
What about some rusty object?
Or The family heirloom!
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