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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Infra-red Filters?
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09/28/2004 08:53:17 PM · #1
How do they work? And for what purpose? Anyone have links? Thanks =)
09/28/2004 09:06:26 PM · #2
Are you asking about Infra-red 'pass' filters or Infra-red 'reject' filters?
09/28/2004 09:12:40 PM · #3
Infrared filters for imfrared photography don't work on digital cameras,
09/28/2004 09:16:13 PM · #4
my neighbor, who uses a 10D, uses an infrared filter...

regardless, how do they work and what do they do as stated in my original statement =)
09/28/2004 09:26:10 PM · #5
Originally posted by doctornick:

Infrared filters for imfrared photography don't work on digital cameras,


I am in no means implying your wrong but I would like to ask you a question. I read an article that if you point your camera at a remote and look through the LCD or viewfinder and can see the infrared light up when you push a button then your camera IS capable of infrared photography. I tested this with my FZ1 and could see the infrared light up when I pushed the button. I called a local store and asked them about an 87-filer which the article said would be required. I was told that yes it would work. I have not tried it or purchased such filter that is why I'm not questioning your answer. But I do find it interesting and would love to buy the filter if it works. But I do not want to waste my money if it doesn't work.

Message edited by author 2004-09-28 21:29:44.
09/28/2004 09:26:45 PM · #6
Originally posted by doctornick:

Infrared filters for imfrared photography don't work on digital cameras,


Ummmmm...........yes they do.

Take a look here Infrared (IR) basics for digital photographers

I did this image with an R72 filter on my G5

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09/28/2004 11:03:41 PM · #7
I know that R72 IR filters work with my Fuji 602s. I've been itching to get one for the longest time, and I've even visited a couple local shops only to come up spades :(

I love the look of IR. I would test it with the remote control test before buying a filter, though. I don't know much 'bout the Rebels, but I'm pretty sure they will detect IR. You just have to use a longer exposure time to gather all that 'hidden' light :)

good luck!
09/28/2004 11:28:31 PM · #8
hmmmmm, i hadn't heard that they don't work on digital cameras... i'm waiting for my local camera store to get them in stock (they've been out for a few weeks) but i'm anxious to try it, too. maybe i better read up on it first.
09/29/2004 12:10:24 AM · #9
From my 5700. My D70 works also! (C:
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09/29/2004 12:13:58 AM · #10
works on a 300D too, chiqui had some pics up of her experiments with the infrared filter on her 300D i believe.
edit: cant seem to find the thread, dont know if it exists lol. but i do know the 300D responds to IR, i did the remote control test a while back and it worked.

Message edited by author 2004-09-29 00:21:54.
09/29/2004 02:40:54 AM · #11
Who said infrared photography didn't work on digital cameras?!

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Those were all taken on my 10d with 35-105mm lens and a Hoya RM-72 filter.

Also note that most digital cameras have an ir-cut filter before the sensor and certain lenses have a varying amount of glass coating to help block ir. With a 10d, you will be looking at 15-30 second exposures under full sunlight. On cloudy or windy days, this can be problematic as you will get blurring in the clouds and trees. Sony cameras can do a better job in nightshot mode I believe, and there are procedures to take off the ir-cut filter in some cameras.

Message edited by author 2004-09-29 02:44:35.
09/29/2004 03:11:31 AM · #12
Originally posted by doctornick:

Infrared filters for imfrared photography don't work on digital cameras,


nonsense, have a look in my portfolio.

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these were taken with a Heliopan RG780 filter (=Wratten 87)

Message edited by author 2004-09-29 03:22:19.
09/29/2004 03:21:23 AM · #13
Originally posted by jmlelii:

How do they work? And for what purpose? Anyone have links? Thanks =)


Infrared filters (the Hoya R72 is very popular) block most of the visible light and they pass IR light (they really should be called infrared pass lenses).

Digital sensors are IR sensitive, but the camera's contain in internal IR blocking filter because the IR affect the quality if the image. But because the internal filters often are not perfect, you can put in IR pass filter on the camera, set it to long exposure and then still record an image from IR light.

Some camera's, like my Sony, allow you to remove the internal blocking filter, so the camera becomes fully sensitive to IR again. Then you can take IR images with short exposure times. During daytime you actually need an ND filter to cut away some of the light.
09/29/2004 03:34:29 AM · #14
Originally posted by willem:

Originally posted by jmlelii:

How do they work? And for what purpose? Anyone have links? Thanks =)


Infrared filters (the Hoya R72 is very popular) block most of the visible light and they pass IR light (they really should be called infrared pass lenses).

Digital sensors are IR sensitive, but the camera's contain in internal IR blocking filter because the IR affect the quality if the image. But because the internal filters often are not perfect, you can put in IR pass filter on the camera, set it to long exposure and then still record an image from IR light.

Some camera's, like my Sony, allow you to remove the internal blocking filter, so the camera becomes fully sensitive to IR again. Then you can take IR images with short exposure times. During daytime you actually need an ND filter to cut away some of the light.


The ND-filter is necessary on the Sony, because Sony limited the exposure to f2.0 and a shutter speed of 1/60 or slower (allegedly, to prevent people using this option to look through wet bathing clothes on a sunny beach :-). In broad daylight these settings will give you heavy overexposure, hence the ND filter. A tripod also helps with these slow shutter speeds.

Willem, the IR images in your portfolio inspired me to try this myself, you have some great pictures there! Still waiting for the ND filters to arrive, though.
10/05/2004 07:31:15 PM · #15
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What have I done wrong? I just tried out my new infrared filter (Hoya R72) and, um... it's not working. Surely I've messed up somehow.

ISO 50
4" shutter speed
f/3.5

Any help is MOST appreciated.
10/05/2004 07:35:49 PM · #16
I read an article that if you point your camera at a remote and look through the LCD or viewfinder and can see the infrared light up when you push a button then your camera IS capable of infrared photography.

try this without the filter. if you don't see the ir light up then your camera can not view I.R.
10/05/2004 07:36:47 PM · #17
Originally posted by annasense:

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What have I done wrong? I just tried out my new infrared filter (Hoya R72) and, um... it's not working. Surely I've messed up somehow.

ISO 50
4" shutter speed
f/3.5

Any help is MOST appreciated.


Most digital cameras block most of the IR light but as you can see from previous posts good results can still be had. Longer exposure is most likely in order in your case.
10/05/2004 07:46:20 PM · #18
Originally posted by SDW65:

I read an article that if you point your camera at a remote and look through the LCD or viewfinder and can see the infrared light up when you push a button then your camera IS capable of infrared photography.

try this without the filter. if you don't see the ir light up then your camera can not view I.R.


I've found websites dedicated to Infrared Photography with the Olympus C-8080... I just wish that these photographers posted better descriptions on what they did!! I don't know if it just takes a lot of post-editing, or more sunlight, or longer shutter speeds, or what. :) Thanks for the tips thus far... any more?
10/05/2004 07:48:18 PM · #19
probably have to bump your ISO and longer exposure.
10/05/2004 07:51:53 PM · #20
Originally posted by longlivenyhc:

probably have to bump your ISO and longer exposure.


how high do you think i should bump the ISO?
10/05/2004 07:57:35 PM · #21
I wouldnt bump hte ISO, but it does require use of a tripod, as you will be looking at 10-20 second exposures IN BROAD DAYLIGHT =)
10/05/2004 07:57:50 PM · #22
Originally posted by annasense:

Originally posted by longlivenyhc:

probably have to bump your ISO and longer exposure.


how high do you think i should bump the ISO?


From the picture you posted it looks like about 3 - 4 stops under exposed so to increase the exposure time you need to do one of two things (or both) increase the ISO or lengthen the amount of time the shutter is open.

50 - 100 ISO is one stop, 100 to 200 is another stop. I would start with shutter speed only and experiment since increasing the ISO will increase the amount of noise.
10/05/2004 08:06:45 PM · #23
Originally posted by jmlelii:

I wouldnt bump hte ISO, but it does require use of a tripod, as you will be looking at 10-20 second exposures IN BROAD DAYLIGHT =)


I'm guessing the lighting's the first issue... it was already cloudy, and then the sun is setting, too, so that might be my biggest problem. I tried a 30" exposure (with the tripod, of course, I have a hard time holding a camera still at 1/125 ;)), and it was a little better. Maybe it won't be cloudy tomorrow and I can try it properly... 'cept I think I heard the word "rain" in the forecast. I'll keep my fingers crossed.

Colette, thank you so much for going in depth with the ISO. That will help me experiment, too. :)

10/05/2004 08:53:10 PM · #24
you will definitely need to use a tripod ^_^
10/06/2004 02:29:42 PM · #25
would anyone who does infrared photography mind posting some straight-out-of-the-camera shots, so i can get an idea of how much is done in-camera and how much is PS adjusted? it's still too cloudy here to get a good shot (well, that and i'm at work), but i'd like to keep learning in my down time.

thanks in advance!!
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