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10/11/2004 10:05:26 AM · #76
This thread just goes to show ya...Something happens everywhere!
Hamilton, Ontario Canada.
One of our most famous (infamous) events to take place here was the Evelyn Dick story....of how she killed her husband and dismembered and disposed of his body. Bestselling non-fiction book "TORSO" resulted.
Hometown of Martin Short.
Home of famous photographer Randy Drumm.
10/11/2004 10:05:35 AM · #77
I live only a handful of miles North of Detroit. In the industrialized world, I have to say that it is one of the most famous, if anything for being the birthplace of modern manufacturing techniques such as assembly lines.
10/11/2004 10:12:46 AM · #78
Originally posted by bongo:

This thread just goes to show ya...Something happens everywhere!
Hamilton, Ontario Canada.
One of our most famous (infamous) events to take place here was the Evelyn Dick story....of how she killed her husband and dismembered and disposed of his body. Bestselling non-fiction book "TORSO" resulted.
Hometown of Martin Short.
Home of famous photographer Randy Drumm.


We have a bit of a story like that. The infamous unabomber case was solved by Theodore Kaczynski's younger brother, David, who lives here in Schenectady.
10/11/2004 10:14:57 AM · #79
I grew up next door to the house that John Logie Baird lived in, when he invented Television.

Now I live in Austin, Tx - saw Jenna Bush drinking a few weeks ago...
10/11/2004 10:24:42 AM · #80
I live in London. So does the Queen. Sometimes.
10/11/2004 10:26:51 AM · #81
Originally posted by Gordon:

I grew up next door to the house that John Logie Baird lived in, when he invented Television.

Now I live in Austin, Tx - saw Jenna Bush drinking a few weeks ago...


Gordon, didn't Logie Baird actually invent TV in Trinidad? I worked with the Rank organization for 11 years as their Canadian representative and the stories of his time there are legendary. The locals nearly stoned him to death since they thought he was a witch or something????
10/11/2004 10:32:56 AM · #82
Originally posted by Morgan:

Originally posted by Gordon:

I grew up next door to the house that John Logie Baird lived in, when he invented Television.

Now I live in Austin, Tx - saw Jenna Bush drinking a few weeks ago...


Gordon, didn't Logie Baird actually invent TV in Trinidad? I worked with the Rank organization for 11 years as their Canadian representative and the stories of his time there are legendary. The locals nearly stoned him to death since they thought he was a witch or something????


I don't believe so, no. He left Trinidad and went back to the UK before he invented/ demonstrated a working television. I think the first public demonstration was actually in London. One of his original TVs is still in the library in Helensburgh. From what I can find, he left Trinidad in 1922, and demonstrated a working TV some time around 1926/27, with a Glasgow - London broadcast in 1927 and a working demo in 1926 at the Royal Institution.

From what I've dredged up, he probably wasn't in that house in Helensburgh when he invented it, but was at least born there. I blame plaque writers for elaborating the tale :)

He was born at The Lodge, 121 West Argyle Street, Helensburgh, if anyone wants to go and look :) Not that its so interesting, but I grew up in 18 Suffolk St, Helensburgh.


John Logie Baird (1888 1945) Born at The Lodge, 121 West Argyle Street, Baird had demonstrated by 1900 his flair for electrical engineering by installing the first electric lighting in Helensburgh, in his own home. Moving to London, he first televised a human face on 2 Oct. 1925, making a public demonstration of this pioneering achievement in Jan. 1926. Baird made little out of his invention ; he turned down a large sum of money for the patent and remained untempted by William Chrysler, the American magnate. Then, in 1937, he faced the disappointment of having his system turned down by the Television Advisory Committee for use by the BBC, the EMI-Marconi system being chosen instead. A secretive man, Baird continued to experiment with video recordings, three-dimensional colour television , and radar. He was buried in Helensburgh, where he is commemorated by a bronze bust on the West Esplanade and a stained-glass window in the West Kirk

Famous Helensburgh Residents

Message edited by author 2004-10-11 10:39:48.
10/11/2004 10:35:08 AM · #83
There was a program on the BBC a few months ago about him and they went to his house..

10/11/2004 10:38:15 AM · #84
San Francisco. We've got a pretty bridge, a nice bay, a bunch of celebrities and, most important, it's the home of Anchor Steam Beer.
10/11/2004 10:38:16 AM · #85
Better than any of my own...

As a child, my Grandmother (who is currently 99 years old) lived in the same town in New Jersey as Thomas Edison. She has lots of stories including walking past his factory to go to school and seeing him there working.
10/11/2004 10:46:38 AM · #86
I live in Salisbury, North Carolina...my parents went to high school with Elizabeth Dole, and she still lives here when she and her husband aren't in Washington....Also Stanback headache powders, Food Lion, and if anyone is familiar with Cheerwine---all got their start in Salisbury.
10/11/2004 10:49:02 AM · #87
The President lands AirForce One across the street from where I work. Its an air base he uses when he visits The Philadelphia area.
10/11/2004 10:57:56 AM · #88
I work in downtown Washington DC. Here's the view from my office window:

' . substr('//www.pbase.com/magnetic9999/image/7882923/medium.jpg', strrpos('//www.pbase.com/magnetic9999/image/7882923/medium.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' Click me to enlarge.
10/11/2004 11:02:41 AM · #89
i am the janitor for the space shuttle.... general cleaning, dusting, whiping.. you'd be surprised how much windex we go through.
10/11/2004 11:04:14 AM · #90
Originally posted by sfalice:

San Francisco. We've got a pretty bridge, a nice bay, a bunch of celebrities and, most important, it's the home of Anchor Steam Beer.


I visited SF recently and can vouch for the pretty bridge but not the beer. In San Francisco you also have one of the last working steam paddle tugs in the world, The Eppleton Hall, (National Parks Maritime Museum), and it came from the harbour where I live, in England. See my portfolio for some modest shots of the harbour.

Also where I live is the home of Sir Ralph Milbanke whoose daughter Anne Isabella Milbanke married Lord Byron, (the poet?). The marrage took place in the bedroom of the house, (maybe to save time?)

Seaham Hall
10/11/2004 11:05:11 AM · #91
Originally posted by leaf:

i am the janitor for the space shuttle.... general cleaning, dusting, whiping.. you'd be surprised how much windex we go through.


well, ok... maybe not... but i did grow up in swift current, sasaktchewan, canada
10/11/2004 11:08:19 AM · #92
Originally posted by bongo:

This thread just goes to show ya...Something happens everywhere!
Hamilton, Ontario Canada.
One of our most famous (infamous) events to take place here was the Evelyn Dick story....of how she killed her husband and dismembered and disposed of his body. Bestselling non-fiction book "TORSO" resulted.
Hometown of Martin Short.
Home of famous photographer Randy Drumm.


Now Randy, I see from your profile that you are actually a resident of Stoney Creek. And, you claim that you are from Hamilton. There is a big difference you know. You should be proud of your town.

Stoney Creek is famous as the place where the Canadians (aka British) and the local Mohawk Indians joined to soundly defeated the Americans when they attacked during the War of 1812. Remember Laura Secord and the lessor known, Billy Green (Canada's answer to Paul Revere)?

You really should visit the Stoney Creek Battlefield House Museum and the Monument. You will discover how important and decisive this battle was in the shaping of North America.

Also, a visit to the local cemetery will reveal the graves of many Generals and senior officers (King Street at 20 Highway) from both sides.

The Canadians are the only people to defeat the USA in war!

A group from Canada even torched the White House; they burned it to the ground! The White House, the USA's presidential mansion, would not be white if it wasn't for the Canadians in the war of 1812.

What happened was that a bunch of Americans came up and sacked and burned what eventually became the city of Toronto, as a reprisal a force of Canadian / British regulars and a force of very irregular colonial types, just sort of farm hands with guns, loaded on a ship and went down and sacked Washington, including setting fire to the presidential mansion, which at the time was painted pink.

When they rebuilt it, it was painted white and it has been the White House ever since. Can you imagine? "President Bush spoke today from the Pink House (chuckles)?" It'd be pink today if not for us!

Stoney Creek is also the birth place of Flag Day (originally June 6th), but now celebrated every year on July 1st.

So, you do not need to be from Hamilton to be famous. There is actually a lot more interesting stuff to know about Stoney Creek too - professional sports players (baseball, hockey, football; the world's first Women's Institute; musicians; artists; educators; inventors; and political leaders.
10/11/2004 11:42:33 AM · #93
Gordon, Here is a bit about what I was referring too...

The man who invented TV

by Jeremy Taylor

In Trinidad, they called him an obeah man, a dealer in supernatural forces. Not surprisingly. He was a strange-looking white man from Britain, with blue eyes and an intense expression and a mop of fair hair, and he had settled down in a wooden overseer's bungalow on a cocoa estate some miles outside Port of Spain.

That was unusual enough back in 1920. He said he was making jams and preserves, orange marmalade and guava jelly; that was an odd occupation for an expatriate 70 years ago. But it was the other things that really unnerved the people of the quiet Santa Cruz valley. The strange lights flashing at night from the overseer's bungalow, the weird noises. The man must be working magic.

One night, things came to a head and there was a confrontation which entered local folklore. A crowd gathered outside the wooden bungalow, torches flaring in the dark, and there were loud insults, demands for the obeah to stop. Stones were thrown, and clods of earth. The jam-maker, being a hot-tempered and impetuous Scot, rushed out, stood his ground, and started hurling the missiles back. He was not a man to be easily dissuaded.
-----
Baird was always a secretive man, and the last thing he wanted was to let his many competitors know what he was up to. But his most recent biographers, quoting eye-witnesses including one who worked with the Stollmeyer estate at the time, claim that Baird made his basic breakthrough in television during those nine months in Santa Cruz. One witness "saw a picture transmitted from the Stollmeyer house to the overseer's house where Baird lived, a distance of a few hundred feet". Cables were used, and there was no sound, but the pictures, though hazy, showed "recognisable" faces.

Back in Britain, it was another four years before Baird was ready to make his breakthrough public, and he fostered the idea that it had come to him suddenly in Hastings in 1923, glossing over the long years of experimenting. Fund-raising continued - Australian honey, horticultural goods, yellow soap, non-rust razor-blades and pneumatic shoes.

In 1925 Baird made his first public demonstration of television, in Selfridges' store in London, followed by a demonstration to selected guests, scientists and a reporter from the Times in early 1926. The Times conceded that the image produced by Baird's Televisor, though "faint and often blurred", showed that he could transmit live pictures with enough detail to show "such things as the play of expression on the face''.


10/11/2004 12:44:14 PM · #94
Originally posted by Gordon:

Now I live in Austin, Tx - saw Jenna Bush drinking a few weeks ago...

Saving the photos for The Enquirer eh ...?
10/11/2004 12:53:06 PM · #95
Originally posted by Morgan:

The Canadians are the only people to defeat the USA in war!

Except maybe for the Vietnamese ...

Originally posted by Morgan:

... as a reprisal a force of Canadian / British regulars and a force of very irregular colonial types, just sort of farm hands with guns, loaded on a ship and went down and sacked Washington, including setting fire to the presidential mansion, which at the time was painted pink.

When they rebuilt it, it was painted white and it has been the White House ever since. Can you imagine? "President Bush spoke today from the Pink House (chuckles)?" It'd be pink today if not for us!

So we have you latent monarchists to thank for our slow descent into the Imperial Presidency ... : (
10/11/2004 01:06:39 PM · #96
Originally posted by afarland:

Well, I live in Dublin, OH... home of the corporate office of Wendy's (before he died, I saw Dave Thomas all the time around town). We are also home to Jack Nicklaus and his yearly Memorial Golf Tournament. It's a traffic nightmare!

Dublin is also home to 109 human-sized ears of cement corn as part of our "Art in Public Places," which has been recognized on FoodTV, haha :)


You live in Dublin? I live in Powell. That's pretty cool. I took my complexity entry in Scioto Park, where that ridiculous Leatherlips sculpture is.
10/11/2004 01:12:11 PM · #97
That's pretty freakin cool! I guess you get to see the launches everytime too. Do you have an pictures of that?

Originally posted by leaf:

i am the janitor for the space shuttle.... general cleaning, dusting, whiping.. you'd be surprised how much windex we go through.

10/11/2004 02:45:34 PM · #98
I live in Kalamazoo, home of Gibson Guitar. And the song "I've got a gal in Kalamazoo.
Bobby Hatfield (Righteous Brother) died of a cocaine induced heart attack here at our Radison Hotel in 2003.
Derek Jeter grew up here and went to Kalamazoo Central High School.
Selma Blair went to Kalamazoo College for a semester.
There is an upcomming movie being made called Kalamazoo? About 3 girls returning to Kalamazoo for their 10 year reunion. It was filmed here.
The Taxi's from the show Taxi were all supplied by the Checker Motors Corporation of Kalamazoo Michigan.

I work in Battle Creek, Michigan. Cereal city USA, Home of Tony the Tiger.
In 1994, the movie Road to Wellville was made about Dr. Kellogg and his sanitarium, and about how Corn Flakes came about. Kind of weird movie, and a little scary too, but what can I say?
While Post was visiting the sanitarium, he was fascinated by the health foods Kellogg had and a few years later, invented Grape Nuts. The Sanitarium is now our Federal Center. Creepy.
Battle Creek was the training ground for soldiers in both world wars. We have Fort Custer National Cemetary.
Sojourner Truth lived here for awhile.

Thanks for the post, while looking up my cities, I learned a few things today. :)
10/11/2004 02:48:34 PM · #99
I live in Rochester, NY, home of George Eastman and KODAK.
10/11/2004 09:40:32 PM · #100
I too live in Vancouver, which is famous for Seattle's coffee. I often wonder why we can't have our own coffee, we drink enough of it!!

I am right on the Vancouver Indy track. You can walk out of my building ... take 20 steps and get run over. What a joy. Blahhhh. Photo op? definitely. Noise pollution. Also definitely.

Other than the Indy, this is THE most BEAUTIFUL city on earth.

Come visit.


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