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DPChallenge Forums >> Current Challenge >> hue/saturation in standard editing ?
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02/09/2020 03:57:00 PM · #1
Can I use a hue/saturation adjustment in standard editing?
I read the rules but it seems only allowed in extended editing?

Message edited by author 2020-02-09 15:57:40.
02/09/2020 05:15:19 PM · #2
Originally posted by willem:

Can I use a hue/saturation adjustment in standard editing?
I read the rules but it seems only allowed in extended editing?

No, you can definitely do it in standard editing. Within broad limits, you can use whatever filters & tools PS and LR offer in standard editing. We do not prohibit specific tools, but only pay attention to the results you produce with them.

So, for example, you have to do everything with a single original (we consider HDR merges and focus stacks to be viable originals) and you can't use the cloning functions to move elements around in the image, but you MAY clone out elements of the scene as long as the space is filled up with what would be visible if the removed element were not there. Got a piece of trash on the lawn? No problem, clone it out and replace it with a bit of lawn.

If you just do ordinary, straightforward processing with PS or LR (clone out distractions, play with histograms, dodge & burn, hue/saturation, a whole host of things), you can't go wrong. If you ever worry you're going too far, ask us.

R

Message edited by author 2020-02-09 17:16:00.
02/09/2020 09:41:28 PM · #3
Another standard editing question. Can you apply a texture if it does not apply to the whole picture. Like to cover a background?
02/09/2020 09:52:48 PM · #4
Originally posted by ltlmschrisss:

Another standard editing question. Can you apply a texture if it does not apply to the whole picture. Like to cover a background?

No, that's not a good idea. When you apply a texture selectively we tend to treat it as an added feature. I'm not saying it's never been allowed, but as we get deeper into the issues involved in differentiating "texture-added images" from "double exposure" or "composite images", that is how it's beginning to trend. It is for sure a grey area.

Message edited by author 2020-02-09 21:53:14.
02/09/2020 09:57:30 PM · #5
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by ltlmschrisss:

Another standard editing question. Can you apply a texture if it does not apply to the whole picture. Like to cover a background?

No, that's not a good idea. When you apply a texture selectively we tend to treat it as an added feature. I'm not saying it's never been allowed, but as we get deeper into the issues involved in differentiating "texture-added images" from "double exposure" or "composite images", that is how it's beginning to trend. It is for sure a grey area.


Thanks I was voting in a challenge and saw something that was like this.
02/09/2020 10:00:58 PM · #6
Originally posted by ltlmschrisss:

Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by ltlmschrisss:

Another standard editing question. Can you apply a texture if it does not apply to the whole picture. Like to cover a background?

No, that's not a good idea. When you apply a texture selectively we tend to treat it as an added feature. I'm not saying it's never been allowed, but as we get deeper into the issues involved in differentiating "texture-added images" from "double exposure" or "composite images", that is how it's beginning to trend. It is for sure a grey area.

Thanks I was voting in a challenge and saw something that was like this.

It's VERY important that you vote as if every image you see is legally edited. Sometimes things that appear dicey actually are legitimate. If you doubt the legitimacy of an image, there's a button to report it to SC and we will look into it. This is absolutely fundamental to fair voting, as one of the great pleasures of DPC challenges is the opportunity to pull off something that doesn't look like it could legally be done :-)
02/09/2020 10:24:45 PM · #7
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by ltlmschrisss:

Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by ltlmschrisss:

Another standard editing question. Can you apply a texture if it does not apply to the whole picture. Like to cover a background?

No, that's not a good idea. When you apply a texture selectively we tend to treat it as an added feature. I'm not saying it's never been allowed, but as we get deeper into the issues involved in differentiating "texture-added images" from "double exposure" or "composite images", that is how it's beginning to trend. It is for sure a grey area.

Thanks I was voting in a challenge and saw something that was like this.

It's VERY important that you vote as if every image you see is legally edited. Sometimes things that appear dicey actually are legitimate. If you doubt the legitimacy of an image, there's a button to report it to SC and we will look into it. This is absolutely fundamental to fair voting, as one of the great pleasures of DPC challenges is the opportunity to pull off something that doesn't look like it could legally be done :-)


I did vote as such. I actually really like the photo. :)
02/09/2020 10:47:47 PM · #8
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by ltlmschrisss:

Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by ltlmschrisss:

Another standard editing question. Can you apply a texture if it does not apply to the whole picture. Like to cover a background?

No, that's not a good idea. When you apply a texture selectively we tend to treat it as an added feature. I'm not saying it's never been allowed, but as we get deeper into the issues involved in differentiating "texture-added images" from "double exposure" or "composite images", that is how it's beginning to trend. It is for sure a grey area.

Thanks I was voting in a challenge and saw something that was like this.

It's VERY important that you vote as if every image you see is legally edited. Sometimes things that appear dicey actually are legitimate. If you doubt the legitimacy of an image, there's a button to report it to SC and we will look into it. This is absolutely fundamental to fair voting, as one of the great pleasures of DPC challenges is the opportunity to pull off something that doesn't look like it could legally be done :-)

It's like why they don't want the refs to blow the whistle after a fumble that looked like a forward pass or down by contact.

(I only understand things when they are put in football terms or compared to a Seinfeld episode.)
02/10/2020 12:18:57 AM · #9
Originally posted by Art Roflmao:

It's like why they don't want the refs to blow the whistle after a fumble that looked like a forward pass or down by contact.

(I only understand things when they are put in football terms or compared to a Seinfeld episode.)

That works :-)
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