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11/04/2004 09:23:13 AM · #1
... just watch what you say.

Just a heads up for the peeps in the political rants ...
//www.livejournal.com/users/anniesj/331112.html
11/04/2004 09:39:35 AM · #2
Thanks for the alert ... I've always assumed "they" were reading everything I posted anyway. I'm pretty sure I already have an FBI file.

Interestingly, although I've been photographed and fingerprinted numerous times, I've never actally been arrested (yet).
11/04/2004 10:13:53 AM · #3
I never condone violence of any sort, never have, and would never commit any violent act against anyone. I"m sure the authorities have been reading what's been stated here and I've already been warned in one of the threads of that possibility by a conservative poster.
11/04/2004 10:15:17 AM · #4
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Thanks for the alert ... I've always assumed "they" were reading everything I posted anyway. I'm pretty sure I already have an FBI file.

Interestingly, although I've been photographed and fingerprinted numerous times, I've never actally been arrested (yet).


Why? Fess up! What did you do?

p.s. Thanks for the link, BOD. Interesting reading, indeed!
11/04/2004 10:20:43 AM · #5
Originally posted by digistoune:

Originally posted by GeneralE:

Thanks for the alert ... I've always assumed "they" were reading everything I posted anyway. I'm pretty sure I already have an FBI file.

Interestingly, although I've been photographed and fingerprinted numerous times, I've never actally been arrested (yet).


Why? Fess up! What did you do?

When I turned 18, I registered and voted for a Republican, Pete McCloskey.
11/04/2004 10:32:55 AM · #6
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Thanks for the alert ... I've always assumed "they" were reading everything I posted anyway. I'm pretty sure I already have an FBI file.

Interestingly, although I've been photographed and fingerprinted numerous times, I've never actally been arrested (yet).


All the best people have FBI files. Almost required if you want to consider yourself interesting, I think ;)

Last time (about 3 weeks ago) I even got the old fashioned ink and roller on paper approach, rather than the new fangled laser scanner finger printing. The British file on me even has DNA samples.
I'm just that popular with the authorities, here and abroad.
11/04/2004 10:35:34 AM · #7
While that is a crazy story, it is important to note that he thinks someone tipped him off in his own site. Not that it can't happen here or elsewhere, but to have "big brother" watching the entire Internet has to be nearly impossible. Not only that, but there are so many other sites that have to be much, much, much further up the list of sites to monitor than a photography site.

Still though, it is good advice. Posting in forums on the Internet is essentially like writing into the local paper, and then being surprised others read it.
11/04/2004 10:38:33 AM · #8
One of the ways that free speech is hindered is exactly what happened to the author of the article and has most recently happened when FBI agents were making visits to demonstrators prior to the RNC. It has also happened to the groups that Michael Moore reported on in his film Farenheit 9/11. To my knowledge no one was ever arrested or found to have been any kind of threat. It's most probable that these kinds of visits will continue to political dissenters.

Message edited by author 2004-11-04 10:39:53.
11/04/2004 10:39:54 AM · #9
Originally posted by Gordon:

Originally posted by GeneralE:

Thanks for the alert ... I've always assumed "they" were reading everything I posted anyway. I'm pretty sure I already have an FBI file.

Interestingly, although I've been photographed and fingerprinted numerous times, I've never actally been arrested (yet).


All the best people have FBI files. Almost required if you want to consider yourself interesting, I think ;)

Last time (about 3 weeks ago) I even got the old fashioned ink and roller on paper approach, rather than the new fangled laser scanner finger printing. The British file on me even has DNA samples.
I'm just that popular with the authorities, here and abroad.


And pray tell, what did you do to garner such attention?
11/04/2004 10:41:35 AM · #10
Originally posted by nborton:

While that is a crazy story, it is important to note that he thinks someone tipped him off in his own site.

That's the worst part of it. Somebody who disagrees with what you post can report you, have you raided, have you put on the FBI's files for life, and possibly stop you from ever flying again.

And that could happen here just as easily as on a community like Livejournal.
11/04/2004 10:41:42 AM · #11
Originally posted by nborton:

While that is a crazy story, it is important to note that he thinks someone tipped him off in his own site. Not that it can't happen here or elsewhere, but to have "big brother" watching the entire Internet has to be nearly impossible.

Carnivore is supposed to come close ...
11/04/2004 10:41:53 AM · #12
Originally posted by digistoune:

And pray tell, what did you do to garner such attention?

Well, being Scottish is bad enough. ;-)
11/04/2004 10:43:27 AM · #13
Originally posted by Gordon:

All the best people have FBI files. Almost required if you want to consider yourself interesting, I think ;)

I've never dared check, on the very slight chance I don't have one. Asking gets one started ...
11/04/2004 10:45:17 AM · #14
I believe that the government snoops on it's citizens through the programs titled: Echelon and Carnivore. One run by the FBI and the other by the NSC. Computers monitor internet and landline activity for certain key words and then they are reported to humans for more in depth analysis for the possiblity of threat. I remember reading of a soccor mom about 5 years ago who was visited by the authorities when over the phone, while talking to another soccor mom stated that her son's team "bombed."
11/04/2004 11:00:46 AM · #15
Imagine how outraged everyone would be if this level of privacy intrusion were conducted by corporations, who at worst can fill your inbox and sell you some jeans, instead of a branch of the government which actually has the legal right to kill you for treason. Anyone ever read 1984? These days I almost feel if you gave that novel to your average God-fearing Bush-supporting neo-con he/she would say 'yeah that sounds about right'. *Shudder*

I dunno...I laughed out loud when I heard Bush saying that 'the American public will not succumb to the politics of fear'. Even moreso when he said that 'I believe God wants everyone to be free'. I mean, that doesn't MEAN anything. It's just a sentence with 'God' and 'free' in it. Ah well. For those of you who didn't vote for this mess, I feel for you. Some perverted side of me wants to watch the country rot. You make your bed, you lie in it. What has the world come to...
11/04/2004 11:02:36 AM · #16
Yes Big Brother is watching. A scary thought indeed. All the more reason to reduce government and it's power over us. The problem is definately non-partisan. The problems you have talked about here happened throughout the entire Clinton Administration as well; thats when they fired up Echelon and Carivore. Government snooping has been going on for decades. Did you know your caught on camera over 8 times a day on average? It's a scary thought to think about how we have and are continuing being watched and monitored.
11/04/2004 11:04:13 AM · #17
Originally posted by Olyuzi:

I believe that the government snoops on it's citizens through the programs titled: Echelon and Carnivore. One run by the FBI and the other by the NSC. Computers monitor internet and landline activity for certain key words and then they are reported to humans for more in depth analysis for the possiblity of threat. I remember reading of a soccor mom about 5 years ago who was visited by the authorities when over the phone, while talking to another soccor mom stated that her son's team "bombed."


while i am not saying it couldn't happen. i find it very unlikely that the "average" person typing a key word is going to be "black listed". supposing that a program can catch every key word, and not miss a single one. it seems as though there would be so much to go through and investigate, it would take an army of people to work through it all.

edit: by the way i am not for privacy invasion either. however, the sheer number of key word hits has to be huge. in a sence, there is privacy in being lost in the numbers.

Message edited by author 2004-11-04 11:08:10.
11/04/2004 11:07:09 AM · #18
Originally posted by jimmythefish:

Imagine how outraged everyone would be if this level of privacy intrusion were conducted by corporations, who at worst can fill your inbox and sell you some jeans, instead of a branch of the government which actually has the legal right to kill you for treason. Anyone ever read 1984? These days I almost feel if you gave that novel to your average God-fearing Bush-supporting neo-con he/she would say 'yeah that sounds about right'. *Shudder*

I dunno...I laughed out loud when I heard Bush saying that 'the American public will not succumb to the politics of fear'. Even moreso when he said that 'I believe God wants everyone to be free'. I mean, that doesn't MEAN anything. It's just a sentence with 'God' and 'free' in it. Ah well. For those of you who didn't vote for this mess, I feel for you. Some perverted side of me wants to watch the country rot. You make your bed, you lie in it. What has the world come to...


while both sides are just as guilty when it comes to big brother activity, you have much more reason to fear from your leaders.. they are the ones wanting to increase control over our lives, and they want to take away our guns...
11/04/2004 11:07:21 AM · #19
Originally posted by digistoune:



And pray tell, what did you do to garner such attention?


One was part of a murder investigation. The other as part of a background check in to an alien doctor. Life would be less interesting if I was making this up.
11/04/2004 11:09:50 AM · #20
Originally posted by Anachronite:

Did you know your caught on camera over 8 times a day on average?

I'd hate to see the figures for the UK. We are apparently world leaders in deploying CCTV cameras *everywhere*.
I'm captured on 3 cameras every time I arrive at work, leave for lunch, come back and go home, plus there's another watching whenever I go for a smoke.
11/04/2004 11:15:22 AM · #21
It's most definitely partisan. Patriot Act? Patriot Act II? These are partisan. If you want to reduce your government's control over you, you voted for the wrong administration. They're going to overturn Roe V. Wade and ban gay marriage. This is MORE control. This is a loss of personal freedoms. I can't believe that people swallow the sancitiy of marriage crap in a country which has umpteen 'marry a millionaire' programs on TV. IT'S NOT A MARRIAGE ISSUE. It's a gay hatin' issue. Plain and simple.

It makes me angry just thinking about it. All the work done by civil libertarians down the damned drain.

Originally posted by Anachronite:

Yes Big Brother is watching. A scary thought indeed. All the more reason to reduce government and it's power over us.


Message edited by author 2004-11-04 11:18:16.
11/04/2004 11:17:09 AM · #22
I don't think threats of asssasination of the president are covered by free speech, are they?

Anyway, you might also want to check out the follow up entry.
11/04/2004 11:19:34 AM · #23
[quote]These days I almost feel if you gave that novel to your average God-fearing Bush-supporting neo-con he/she would say 'yeah that sounds about right'. *Shudder* [/quote]

The danger about making generalizations about large groups of people is that they are very often wrong about many in that large group.


11/04/2004 11:25:49 AM · #24
Danger that I'm wrong that many people wouldn't see the US going in the direction of 1984 a bad thing? Hmm...let me think about that for a second...yeah that's dangerous all right.

Originally posted by karmat:

The danger about making generalizations about large groups of people is that they are very often wrong about many in that large group.

11/04/2004 11:26:26 AM · #25
This is why so many here in the US are so fearful about the Patriot Act, both I, and II (not yet voted into law). One of the issue here is will the government use these new spy laws to target political dissendents. USPA II has provisions for revoking the citizenship of those it deems to be terrorists with possible deposition outside of the country, with no legal recourse. Who will decide who is a terrorist?
The history of the US is one where political dissendents have been harassed by the authorities through covert programs, such as CoIntellpro and McCarthyism.

Originally posted by nborton:

Originally posted by Olyuzi:

I believe that the government snoops on it's citizens through the programs titled: Echelon and Carnivore. One run by the FBI and the other by the NSC. Computers monitor internet and landline activity for certain key words and then they are reported to humans for more in depth analysis for the possiblity of threat. I remember reading of a soccor mom about 5 years ago who was visited by the authorities when over the phone, while talking to another soccor mom stated that her son's team "bombed."


while i am not saying it couldn't happen. i find it very unlikely that the "average" person typing a key word is going to be "black listed". supposing that a program can catch every key word, and not miss a single one. it seems as though there would be so much to go through and investigate, it would take an army of people to work through it all.

edit: by the way i am not for privacy invasion either. however, the sheer number of key word hits has to be huge. in a sence, there is privacy in being lost in the numbers.


Message edited by author 2004-11-04 11:36:21.
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