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01/21/2005 08:03:29 PM · #1
Hi.

Well, long story short, I bought a Nikon D70 DSLR. Used if for a day then noticed ugly dust on all images. Tried cleaning it every which way - with varying success - over a two month period. Finally I did something stupid and wrote the camera off and had to buy a whole new one!

Now I've had the brand-new camera less than 24 hours and there's dust on the !@$!#@!!! CCD already!

I unpacked the camera from the box, carefully unwrapped the lens etc. so as not to stir any dust that may have been around, attached the thing very carefully, with the camera opening facing down. All to no avail.

I've been advised by the "professional" service agents to use nothing but a puffer – “Nothing! Don't use air cans as several people have written off their CCD's after propellant came out." Tell me about it!

I puff and puff (until the mud after the monsoon dries up!) and all I get is the dust moving around and more dust deposited. Yes - I'm using mirror-lock-up - not bulb setting. Things are rapidly getting worse!

There's no way in hell I'm going to touch the CCD with ANYTHING this time around – even though I have successfully cleaned it with 100% alcohol (sort of – leaves streaks in our humid air) and other methods in the past. The "pro" advice is useless as, of course, puffer blowers simply suck dust in to squirt it out again - only with force aimed right onto the CCD (filter) surface. No sense trying to direct the air off the walls of the mirror box to reduce the angle. What difference would that really make with such an intermittent/pathetic little puff anyway?

I cannot use clean air from a compressed/propellant can. I was told doing so would void the warranty if propellant hit the CCD. Done it once – aint gonna risk it again!

So what the heck am I supposed to do? I've read ALL there is to read on CCD maintenance and care while changing lens etc. No two people seem to agree on anything - except the common sense "Hold the camera so the mirror box is always pointing down while changing lens and do it in a 'dust free' zero wind environment." That I have done religiously with the new camera. (I guess I could take only picture of the ground to keep dust falling on the CCD!)

Taking the camera to be services every couple of days would be just silly. Completely out of the question.

Right now, as far as I am concerned, DSLR cameras (ALL OF THEM) are a complete waste of time and money as they’re totally impractical, unreasonably sensitive devices having been poorly designed with no user-serviceable photo sensor! Not exactly rocket science – but there we have it.

My present advice - unless you absolutely NEED to attach pro zoom lens to your camera - FORGET about DSLR! Seriously.

Thoughts anyone?

Message edited by author 2005-01-21 20:14:44.
01/21/2005 08:07:02 PM · #2
Maybe soon you'll see the supersonic wave dust filter on other DSLRs besides Olympus.

Message edited by author 2005-01-21 20:08:00.
01/21/2005 08:10:09 PM · #3
there was a thread here about a week ago about a company called visible dust,which make CCd cleaners, I think it was Terry (Club Juggle ) that posted the info.



Message edited by author 2005-01-21 20:14:00.
01/21/2005 08:12:03 PM · #4
Some newer cameras have ultrasonic mechanisms that help keep dust off the sensor. For others, you need tp use Eclipse (pure methanol, not alchohol) and PecPads. I took about 18,000 shots with frequent lens changes before I had to clean the sensor.
01/21/2005 08:14:02 PM · #5
It's what the healing and clone brushes are for in photoshop...

If you've ever shot/ scanned film, this isn't some new development :)
01/21/2005 08:16:53 PM · #6
Originally posted by Gordon:

It's what the healing and clone brushes are for in photoshop...


Photo printers do not have healing tools - not the home user ones and not the professional ones you might take your card to.
01/21/2005 08:18:32 PM · #7
Originally posted by gruvin:

Originally posted by Gordon:

It's what the healing and clone brushes are for in photoshop...


Photo printers do not have healing tools - not the home user ones and not the professional ones you might take your card to.


Yup. Nor do 1 hour labs that develop film...
01/21/2005 08:18:57 PM · #8
Originally posted by scalvert:

Some newer cameras have ultrasonic mechanisms that help keep dust off the sensor. For others, you need tp use Eclipse (pure methanol, not alchohol) and PecPads. I took about 18,000 shots with frequent lens changes before I had to clean the sensor.


With or without the ultrasound cleaning feature?

As for alcohol etc. What's the use? You clean the CCD only to have new dust there within minutes! And you've invalidated your warranty on a very expensive piece of equipment to boot! You must live in an amazingly dust free environment or something? <shrug>

Message edited by author 2005-01-21 20:19:46.
01/21/2005 08:19:49 PM · #9
I know you have an aversion to physically cleaning the sensor, however that's really the only way to get it really clean. The copperhill method has worked wonderfully for me over a year and a half. The key is the right tool, the right wipes (pecpads) and the right cleaning solution (eclipse, which is highly refined methanol, with less than 5ppm residue).
This method is also very economical. I personally would not use any other method.
01/21/2005 08:20:52 PM · #10
Originally posted by kiwinick:

there was a thread here about a week ago about a company called visible dust,which make CCd cleaners, I think it was Terry (Club Juggle ) that posted the info.


Yup - read it. And many MANY others. There are HUNDREDS (if not thousands) of people having great trouble with all this. I've not seen a reasonable, workable solution yet.
01/21/2005 08:29:04 PM · #11
Originally posted by gruvin:

Originally posted by kiwinick:

there was a thread here about a week ago about a company called visible dust,which make CCd cleaners, I think it was Terry (Club Juggle ) that posted the info.


Yup - read it. And many MANY others. There are HUNDREDS (if not thousands) of people having great trouble with all this. I've not seen a reasonable, workable solution yet.


send my your dSLR. I will send you my Fuji S602 - it is not a dSLR. your problem is solved!
01/21/2005 08:35:54 PM · #12
Originally posted by gruvin:

Originally posted by kiwinick:

there was a thread here about a week ago about a company called visible dust,which make CCd cleaners, I think it was Terry (Club Juggle ) that posted the info.


Yup - read it. And many MANY others. There are HUNDREDS (if not thousands) of people having great trouble with all this. I've not seen a reasonable, workable solution yet.


Yes there is. Too bad it is only available on 2 cameras, of which I own one. I change lenses whereever, whenever. :)
01/21/2005 08:50:06 PM · #13
Originally posted by kirbic:

I know you have an aversion to physically cleaning the sensor, however that's really the only way to get it really clean. The copperhill method has worked wonderfully for me over a year and a half. The key is the right tool, the right wipes (pecpads) and the right cleaning solution (eclipse, which is highly refined methanol, with less than 5ppm residue).
This method is also very economical. I personally would not use any other method.

Yup, works fine for me too. But then again, photography for me is a waste of time anyway, so I don't mind wasting my time with my DSLR. :)


01/21/2005 09:06:34 PM · #14
I think you should just give up, pack the camera up in its box and send it to me. I'll take care of it.
01/21/2005 09:12:02 PM · #15
dont forget to turn off your camera when you switch lenses. Ive had my camera for a year and have only had to clean the sensor once thus far.
01/21/2005 09:18:22 PM · #16
Originally posted by kirbic:

I know you have an aversion to physically cleaning the sensor, however that's really the only way to get it really clean. The copperhill method has worked wonderfully for me over a year and a half....


Very interesting. I'm sure it's going to come down to me cleaning the thing myself with alcohol again as that's the only thing that worked before. But once bitten (NZ$1500!!) - eight times shy.

Isopropyl (100%) certainly aint no good. Leaves horrid streaks. I'd seen the CopperHil method before - but missed that is was Methanol and not Iso'P. Intereting. Thanks.
01/21/2005 09:20:11 PM · #17
I have both Digital Rebel (have owned for about a year and a half now) and a 20D (have had for about 6 months now) neither of which have required any dust removal from the sensor. I have no issues with dust and no, I don't live in a dust free environment. I just use common sense when changing lenses.

Are you changing your lenses with the miror locked up or something?

Have you tried eclipse?

Bill
01/21/2005 09:20:14 PM · #18
Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by gruvin:

... I've not seen a reasonable, workable solution yet.
Yes there is. Too bad it is only available on 2 cameras, of which I own one. I change lenses whereever, whenever. :)


So spill the beans! Which camera is it? I'll rush out and buy one today!
01/21/2005 09:24:29 PM · #19
Originally posted by wackybill:

I have both Digital Rebel (have owned for about a year and a half now) and a 20D (have had for about 6 months now) neither of which have required any dust removal from the sensor. I have no issues with dust and no, I don't live in a dust free environment. I just use common sense when changing lenses.

Are you changing your lenses with the miror locked up or something?

Have you tried eclipse?

Bill


What is Eclipse? Where do you change lens? How often? Inside or outside? Studio or elsewhere? I'm sure if I was in the studio all the time I wouldn't have half the trouble. But I'm not. I take mostly outdoor stuff.

And, imho, it wouldn't make the slightest difference if the mirror was locked up or not - there's no seal betweent he mirror and the CCD whether it's up or down. And, of course, when you take a photo, it sqings up anyhow. Any dust in the mirrir box gets thrown around the place avery time the shutter/mirror moves.

I guess, maybe, I do kive in a dusty place - though New Zealand is known to be one of the cleanest places on earth - or so we're told. <shrug>

I can't change a lens without getting dust more than maybe 2 out of 5 times - especially not outside in a breeze - even slight one.

Message edited by author 2005-01-21 21:25:55.
01/21/2005 09:26:15 PM · #20
Originally posted by gruvin:

Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by gruvin:

... I've not seen a reasonable, workable solution yet.
Yes there is. Too bad it is only available on 2 cameras, of which I own one. I change lenses whereever, whenever. :)


So spill the beans! Which camera is it? I'll rush out and buy one today!


Ehm... just look little bit to the left, right under my user name. ;)
This thingamagic from Olympus really works, I just change lenses. I don't care if it is dusty or not. Just like on my old film SLR. Plus, the camera just works. No focus issues, great colours, and great body.
01/21/2005 09:27:05 PM · #21
Originally posted by gruvin:

Originally posted by wackybill:

I have both Digital Rebel (have owned for about a year and a half now) and a 20D (have had for about 6 months now) neither of which have required any dust removal from the sensor. I have no issues with dust and no, I don't live in a dust free environment. I just use common sense when changing lenses.

Are you changing your lenses with the miror locked up or something?

Have you tried eclipse?

Bill


What is Eclipse? Where do you change lens? How often? Inside or outside? Studio or elsewhere? I'm sure if I was in the studio all the time I wouldn't have half the trouble. But I'm not. I take mostly outdoor stuff.

And, imho, it wouldn't make the slightest difference if the mirror was locked up or not - there's no seal betweent he mirror and the CCD whether it's up or down. And, of course, when you take a photo, it sqings up anyhow. Any dust in the mirrir box gets thrown around the place avery time the shutter/mirror moves.

I guess, maybe, I do kive in a dusty place - though New Zealand is known to be one of the cleanest places on earth - or so we're told. <shrug>

I can't change a lens without getting dust more than maybe 2 out of 5 times - especially not outside in a breeze - even slight one.


Perhaps you and a dSLR just aren't meant for one another. Why not return it and purchase either a 35mm or a consumer digital? Might save you some stress. <shrug>
01/21/2005 09:28:29 PM · #22
The sensor brush seems to be the rave for cleaning all but sticky deposits. It's not cheap, around $100, but the reviews say it works - 100%. For real dirt/sticky deposits, then you can use the copperhill method.

Basically, you spray the brush with some compressed air and that gives it a negative charge, and then pass it gently over your sensor.

I'll post the link in a couple of minutes...

Here it is:
sensor brush

Message edited by author 2005-01-21 21:29:24.
01/21/2005 09:33:57 PM · #23
I've had DSLR's for over a year now, first a Canon EOS300D now the 20D and I've had no problems like this in that time and I'm constantly changing lenses and I'm in Australia. I had one spot on the 300D but one dab with the healing brush on an image and it's gone. Maybe it doesn't bother me because I come from a film background where any finished print required quite some time with a fine brush and paints to retouch out the many spots that magically appear. I'm so glad I don't have to worry about that any more.
01/21/2005 10:37:05 PM · #24
Originally posted by wackybill:

Perhaps you and a dSLR just aren't meant for one another. Why not return it and purchase either a 35mm or a consumer digital? Might save you some stress. <shrug>

It might... but I wanted to get a feel for what people in here thought first. You didn't answer my questions :(

To be honest, I really expected to open a can of worms with people leaping out and saying "yeah, I had that problem too and gave up after many months and dollars." I'm surprised - maybe there is hope yet?
01/21/2005 10:43:02 PM · #25
i've had the 300d for little over 6 months, and i've had only one experience with dust which happened a few weeks ago, just 1 speck of dust which i just used a little blower i had and it flew away and that was that. and i change lenses often. i just make sure the camera is off when i switch lenses and i switch the lenses fast.
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