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04/04/2005 02:43:28 AM · #1
Hi,

my camera's not so great, but I'm no expert either. How does one go about getting the right focus? I will have to dig my cameras guidebook out of the closet and try to learn how to do this properly. All Of the photos I have taken have received comments about focus. Please someone teach me!!!

:)

mandy
04/04/2005 02:49:02 AM · #2
Originally posted by mlhop05:

Hi,

my camera's not so great, but I'm no expert either. How does one go about getting the right focus? I will have to dig my cameras guidebook out of the closet and try to learn how to do this properly. All Of the photos I have taken have received comments about focus. Please someone teach me!!!

:)

mandy


One of the *biggest* focus problems occurs because people don't bother pressing the shutter button down half-way *first* when taking a photo. Doing this starts the AF and allows the camera to auto-focus on the subject. If you just click the shutter button (especially if you haven't stopped moving the camera), the AF doesn't have time to work, or quickly focuses on something other than your subject, and then you have focus problems.

other problems are taking a picture of your subject when they aren't centered in the view-finder and letting the AF focus on the background (or some foreground element), instead of focusing on the subject first and then moving the camera off subject before clicking the shutter button the rest of the way down and taking the picture.. having the wrong AF setting selected (for more manually able cameras), or having bright or large objects in front of the subject that the AF will track onto instead of the subject.

It just all comes down to practice, practice, practice.
04/04/2005 02:52:48 AM · #3
There's really very little you can do about focus issues with this camera except what artyste said, assuming the trick works on this fuji (it does on most cameras). Here's the thing; you need to dind what PART of the image area the AF is working on (most likely the center) and then FRAME the image so your subject is in the center, and press the shutter halfway toi lock focus. Then, holding the shutter down, reframe to show the actual framing you wish, and press the rest of the way. This will help a lot.

Unfortunately, your camera has virtually NO adjustments for the user:

Fuji equipped the FinePix A210 with a 3.2 megapixel imager, 3X optical zoom lens, movie mode without sound, and webcam function. This automatic point-n-shoot is simple enough for a novice to obtain good results, but offers little creative control for the intermediate user. In addition to automatic exposure shooting mode, the A210 offers manual settings for only Exposure Compensation (+1.5/-2.1EV), and White Balance.

So you can't use manual focus as an option, which higher-end cameras allow you to do.

Robt.
04/04/2005 04:21:57 PM · #4
Thanks,.. I need a new camera. :( I just bought Photoshop CS premium and a computer and a printer and some expensive books for school so I cant get a new camera for a few months. I guess I'm stuck with 4's untill then..:(

I'll try your advice out, thank you agian.

Mandy
04/04/2005 04:47:41 PM · #5
Mandy, I wouldn't get too discouraged about your camera. I looked at the link for your camera model, and even though the photos listed (all taken with a Fujifilm FinePix A210) didn't win any challenges, they're not bad photos. If you make the best of your equipment, you can achieve some good results.
04/04/2005 04:51:10 PM · #6
You can still do well with these small cameras with good technique. Even if you get a more advanced camera you may still use this one from time to time so it could still be important to be able to get the most out of it. I should know, I'm still using a Canon Powershot S100 2mp camera when I only want to carry a camera in my pocket. In addition to the great advice already mentioned, here are a couple of other tips. When you are taking a photo remain perfectly still for a moment AFTER you have pressed the shutter. I always exaggerate this a little to make sure that I don't incur any camera shake to the photo. I am certain that a great deal of blurring is due to the user moving the camera too soon after they press the shutter release. The other thing is to remember to use the macro mode when you are shooting close ups of animals and things like that. It isn't just for super close ups like flowers. You may want to test this out on your camera because in normal mode the close up focussing range can vary between cameras. Just remember to turn the macro mode off when you are done. My Canon turns the macro mode off automatically between shots. It's a little irritating but it does insure that I don't accidentally leave it on for the next scenic shot. I know I rambled a bit but I hope this helps.

T

Message edited by author 2005-04-04 16:53:23.
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