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11/23/2005 12:51:37 PM · #1
Hi. I'm sure this has probably been addressed beofre, butI tried doing a search, but just found a bunch of threads that didn't answer my question.

I missed the point of quite a few photos over the last few challenges because they looked like black rectangles on my monitor. A lot of people talked about calibtrating your monitor. How is this done exactly? Is there a program or a website or something? Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks!
11/23/2005 12:55:42 PM · #2
I use;

//www.photoscientia.co.uk/Gamma.htm

11/23/2005 01:04:59 PM · #3
You can use your eyeballs and squint at adobe gamma and other such utilities to get you in the ballpark, but you really have to get a genuine calibration package, complete with a spyder to do it right.

I purchased a spyder just the other day (el cheapo ColorPlus version) and was appalled (and amazed) at the difference. For years I was thinking that a spyder was a waste of money... Well, if you sell or print your work, not having one is the waste. You will discover this eventually.
11/23/2005 01:59:26 PM · #4
the quickest and easiest (link). Does a good job, and is about as good as it gets without buying additional hardware.

David
11/23/2005 02:33:41 PM · #5
Originally posted by Britannica:

the quickest and easiest (link). Does a good job, and is about as good as it gets without buying additional hardware.

David


Like I said, I thought the same thing for years. And if you don't sell your work or do lots of prints that require color accuracy, then yes, you can set your monitors gamma and call it good. No big deal.

But, if you don't profile your monitor with hardware your colors will be out of balance. Quite possibly very badly out of balance. Mine were.
11/23/2005 03:39:12 PM · #6
ColorPlus is probably the cheapest spyder out there. Will it yield accurate results? I'd like to get an "end to end" solution but that's outside of my budget right now.
11/23/2005 04:06:05 PM · #7
Originally posted by jhonan:

I use;

//www.photoscientia.co.uk/Gamma.htm


I just calibrated my Apple Cinema Display with EyeOne (gamma 2.0) then I went to this site and checked out the gamma 2.0 link, and everythin looked soo wrong, so this site is crap, it doesn't even get close to a correct color profile, so I suggest you try something else for calibration :)
11/24/2005 04:27:50 AM · #8
Originally posted by mcmurma:

Originally posted by Britannica:

the quickest and easiest (link). Does a good job, and is about as good as it gets without buying additional hardware.

David


Like I said, I thought the same thing for years. And if you don't sell your work or do lots of prints that require color accuracy, then yes, you can set your monitors gamma and call it good. No big deal.

But, if you don't profile your monitor with hardware your colors will be out of balance. Quite possibly very badly out of balance. Mine were.

Of course.

Hardware calibrators create profiles that can adjust on a per color basis -- by sight calibrations make broad adjustments to the entire scale of colors and tones at once. Hardware calibration is more accurate -- but it is not always needed. I don't print much, but the few I have printed for family members and such came out just fine.

Hardware calibration is great for aligning the entire workflow, across multiple hardware devices, to one standard -- but the original question was how to calibrate the monitor to be able to enjoy this site better. I don't recall every having to print an image to compete here. Within the realm of being able to not 'miss the point' of the images in the challenges, visual calibration fits the bill nicely without requiring additional expense and effort -- just a small amount of effort.

I don't disagree hardware calibration is probably in his future -- after all, he cared enough about it to ask -- but when he needs the accuracy of calibrating his entire workflow, from camera to printer, he will know it. Just as I have reached the point I am making plans to purchase a hardware calibrator within the next month or so.

I wouldn't push everyone to purchase a dSLR for the challenges either -- although they are generally much more capable than a P&S -- they are just not needed by everyone. I just don't see the benefit in pushing the more expensive options when a less expensive option works quite adequately within the context of the stated need.

David
11/24/2005 06:15:04 AM · #9
mcmurma, could you elaborate on where to view this el cheapo website?
Kathleen

Message edited by author 2005-11-24 06:15:23.
11/24/2005 06:49:41 AM · #10
Originally posted by kbrownvc:

could you elaborate on where to view this el cheapo website?

ColorVision ColorPlus

Message edited by author 2005-11-24 06:51:22.
11/24/2005 09:33:09 AM · #11
Originally posted by Britannica:

Originally posted by mcmurma:

Originally posted by Britannica:

the quickest and easiest (link). Does a good job, and is about as good as it gets without buying additional hardware.

David


Like I said, I thought the same thing for years. And if you don't sell your work or do lots of prints that require color accuracy, then yes, you can set your monitors gamma and call it good. No big deal.

But, if you don't profile your monitor with hardware your colors will be out of balance. Quite possibly very badly out of balance. Mine were.

Of course.

Hardware calibrators create profiles that can adjust on a per color basis -- by sight calibrations make broad adjustments to the entire scale of colors and tones at once. Hardware calibration is more accurate -- but it is not always needed. I don't print much, but the few I have printed for family members and such came out just fine.

Hardware calibration is great for aligning the entire workflow, across multiple hardware devices, to one standard -- but the original question was how to calibrate the monitor to be able to enjoy this site better. I don't recall every having to print an image to compete here. Within the realm of being able to not 'miss the point' of the images in the challenges, visual calibration fits the bill nicely without requiring additional expense and effort -- just a small amount of effort.

I don't disagree hardware calibration is probably in his future -- after all, he cared enough about it to ask -- but when he needs the accuracy of calibrating his entire workflow, from camera to printer, he will know it. Just as I have reached the point I am making plans to purchase a hardware calibrator within the next month or so.

I wouldn't push everyone to purchase a dSLR for the challenges either -- although they are generally much more capable than a P&S -- they are just not needed by everyone. I just don't see the benefit in pushing the more expensive options when a less expensive option works quite adequately within the context of the stated need.

David


wow. was I really that pushy? I thought I was just trying to answer a question with my own personal experience, and that I prefaced it quite well with where and when it may not be necessary.

Your explanation is much more scientific. Perhaps between us the poster can get the information he needs to make an informed decision :)
11/24/2005 09:40:23 AM · #12
Try this site:

//www.normankoren.com/makingfineprints1B.html#gamma_3lvl
11/24/2005 05:55:58 PM · #13
Originally posted by mcmurma:

wow. was I really that pushy? I thought I was just trying to answer a question with my own personal experience, and that I prefaced it quite well with where and when it may not be necessary.

Your explanation is much more scientific. Perhaps between us the poster can get the information he needs to make an informed decision :)

No, not pushy. :) Sorry if I came back a bit strong.

David
11/29/2005 02:25:20 PM · #14
Everyone, thank you very much for the helpful information on this subject. I think I'll start cheap and work my way towards one of the other options as I find the need. I have just started to get back into photography after a long hiatus, so I hope to post to some challenges soon. I'm getting a new camera for Christmas (A Canon S2 IS... sadly a dSLR is still beyond my budget), so I hope that will expand my photography skills with a better tool.
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