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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> Photoshop tips and shortcuts
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Showing posts 1 - 12 of 12, (reverse)
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12/13/2005 09:47:45 AM · #1
I thought it would be useful to have a thread where people could post quick tips on using Photoshop, little shortcuts that Photoshop "amateurs" (like myself) might not know about.

I only recently discovered that when using certain tools like cloning, dodging/burning, painting, etc, that you can right click and the brush resize/hardness tool pops up right there instead of going up top and selecting the pull-down for it. Nothing major, but kind of neat.
12/13/2005 10:04:16 AM · #2
I just learned last night how to whiten teeth,

1. open the pic,
2. press L to open the laso tool
3. zoom in on the teeth, and select the edges of the whole set of teeth all the way arounnd being carful not to select any gums or lips.\
4. go to the select menu and choose feather and choose a radius of 1 pixel
5. open up hugh saturation, on the drop down menu chose yellow,
6. slide the middle one to the let, (i cant think of the name)
7. go back to master hugh saturation and slide the lightness to the riht , but be carfull no to make them look fake,
8. your finished look at the result.

hope someone didnt know this, so it will help them for the rest of you who knew it, its good review. lol
12/13/2005 10:17:21 AM · #3
I will follow this with interest good thought
12/13/2005 10:36:45 AM · #4
I've recently switched to sharpending only in LAB mode, and only on the lightness channel. Doing so prevents some of the nasty color halos that appear when sharpening in color.

To do this, wait until you are completely done editing your photo, including any resizing. Flatten the image by going to Layer -> Flatten Image. The go to Image -> Mode -> LAB Color. Next, open the channels palette and click on the lightness channel. Then, open the USM dialog box and adjust the settings to your preference. Once finished, go back to Image -> Mode -> RGB to reconvert it to RGB and you're done.

Edit: correct spelling

Message edited by author 2005-12-13 10:37:20.
12/13/2005 11:55:42 AM · #5
here are some quickies that i use all the time:

when you control+click the new layer button in the layer palette, it creates a new layer BELOW the active layer.

hit D to reset your foreground/background colors to black and white.

hit X to flip your foreground and background colors.

control+j makes a duplicate layer of the active layer.

adjustment layers RULE!!
12/13/2005 12:02:54 PM · #6
Originally posted by muckpond:


control+j makes a duplicate layer of the active layer.


Not always. If there is a selection active in the image, cntrl-j makes a new layer out of the SELECTION :-)

Robt.
12/13/2005 12:06:04 PM · #7
One of the features I like about CS2, I think it was also available in CS, is the Keyboard Shortcuts and Menus function in the Edit menu. You can assign your own keyboard short cuts to any command you like. I have a set of keyboard shortcuts I have assigned to my own Photoshop program that I use all the time. Seeing I use a graphic tablet I have bought myself a small additional keyboard which I have on the left of my tablet so I don't have to reach across the tablet all the time. It saves a LOT of time.
12/13/2005 12:06:22 PM · #8
The Photoshop® Thread
12/13/2005 01:08:50 PM · #9
Thanks Brad, I never saw that (or don't remember it). I thought I was on to something here.
12/13/2005 03:16:24 PM · #10
The below is from the Adobe Evangelists Website, you want to know about shortcuts... eh... a nice PDF (136K) full of CS2 shortcut...

Power Shortcuts - A thorough list of those keyboard shortcuts we all love
12/13/2005 04:02:43 PM · #11
A fine adjustment sharpening technique from Russell Brown...
(Russell's entertaining video tutorial on this technique)

1-Flatten image.
2-Duplicate background layer.
3-Apply USM to duplicated layer, perhaps oversharpening slightly.
4-Duplicate the sharpened layer.

Now you have three total layers... one is the unchanged background layer and two identical sharpened layers.

5-Select one sharpened layer and set Blending Mode to "Darken".
6-Select the other sharpened layer and set the Blending Mode to "Lighten".

Notes:
USM is achieved by adding white and black pixels along edges in the image to increase contrast and implied clarity. Creating two USM layers where one is set to "Darken" and the other set to "Lighten" separates the black and white USM pixels into two separate layers. This allows you to fine adjust the strength of the white or black pixels independently using the layer opacity sliders.

7-Adjust "Darken" layer opacity to fine tune the black USM pixels.
8-Adjust "Lighten" layer opacity to fine tune the white USM pixels.

For nature and landscape images leaving the "Darken" layer opacity at 100% and setting the "Lighten" layer opacity between 15-60% generally yields the best results.

Message edited by author 2005-12-13 16:28:29.
12/19/2005 02:20:14 AM · #12
Originally posted by stdavidson:

A fine adjustment sharpening technique from Russell Brown...
(Russell's entertaining video tutorial on this technique)

1-Flatten image.
2-Duplicate background layer.
3-Apply USM to duplicated layer, perhaps oversharpening slightly.
4-Duplicate the sharpened layer.

Now you have three total layers... one is the unchanged background layer and two identical sharpened layers.

5-Select one sharpened layer and set Blending Mode to "Darken".
6-Select the other sharpened layer and set the Blending Mode to "Lighten".

Notes:
USM is achieved by adding white and black pixels along edges in the image to increase contrast and implied clarity. Creating two USM layers where one is set to "Darken" and the other set to "Lighten" separates the black and white USM pixels into two separate layers. This allows you to fine adjust the strength of the white or black pixels independently using the layer opacity sliders.

7-Adjust "Darken" layer opacity to fine tune the black USM pixels.
8-Adjust "Lighten" layer opacity to fine tune the white USM pixels.

For nature and landscape images leaving the "Darken" layer opacity at 100% and setting the "Lighten" layer opacity between 15-60% generally yields the best results.


That guy is off the scale! LMAO! Good stuff though, thanks for the post. I guess now I'm a PS Guru!
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