DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> Current Challenge >> DEfine Shallow DOF
Pages:  
Showing posts 1 - 25 of 72, (reverse)
AuthorThread
12/17/2005 11:28:58 PM · #1
Shallow is a relative term. Is it to be as small as possible or in relation to the entire picture?

For example if I was taking a picture of a ring say for the Catalog challenge, I would make sure everything in front and behind was really blurry. If I am taking a picture of a tree on a lawn a bit more would be in focus then if I was taking a picture of something small like a ring but in relation to the entire picture the same area of the picture say two thirds would be out of focus.

Would the picture of the tree not qualify for the challenge or not score as high in that maybe three feet or so would be in focus as opposed to the ring which would only have about an inch in focus even though the area of each picture would still be the same relatively speaking?

Hope I didn't bore you with this long question, I just want to do my best with what I have and no don't go looking for a tree it's just an example.

Mike

12/17/2005 11:33:16 PM · #2
its all about the shot, as long as the main subject is in focus and an interesting photo...
12/17/2005 11:48:31 PM · #3
Thanks Josh.
12/17/2005 11:51:06 PM · #4
i love shallow !

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/11793/thumb/183959.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/11793/thumb/183959.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/11793/thumb/82833.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/11793/thumb/82833.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/292/thumb/131224.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/292/thumb/131224.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/212/thumb/73386.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/212/thumb/73386.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

Message edited by author 2005-12-17 23:55:30.
12/17/2005 11:55:48 PM · #5
Originally posted by soup:

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/11793/thumb/183959.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/11793/thumb/183959.jpg', '/') + 1) . '


The picture is a good example of DOF but it doesn't answer my question. Nice though and your Balance was outstanding.

Mike
12/18/2005 12:01:18 AM · #6
hmm, I don't know if there is a definitive answer to your question man, I think shallowness is all in the eye of the observer...

to me personally, I think that the examples you gave would work for me. I mean, if it is obvious that a narrow dof is used to emphasize the subject and strengthen the composition, I would think that is what the technique is about. But I could be way out of whack...it wouldn't be the first time :-P
12/18/2005 12:01:55 AM · #7
I think Tim answered it perfectly for ya mike, he gave you perfect visual examples of shallow DOF.. Just look...
12/18/2005 12:03:58 AM · #8
thanks ;}
12/18/2005 08:22:00 AM · #9
Originally posted by MPRPRO:

Shallow is a relative term. Is it to be as small as possible or in relation to the entire picture?

For example if I was taking a picture of a ring say for the Catalog challenge, I would make sure everything in front and behind was really blurry. If I am taking a picture of a tree on a lawn a bit more would be in focus then if I was taking a picture of something small like a ring but in relation to the entire picture the same area of the picture say two thirds would be out of focus.

Would the picture of the tree not qualify for the challenge or not score as high in that maybe three feet or so would be in focus as opposed to the ring which would only have about an inch in focus even though the area of each picture would still be the same relatively speaking?

Hope I didn't bore you with this long question, I just want to do my best with what I have and no don't go looking for a tree it's just an example.

Mike


In my own research of this subject, there is shallow DOF and Wide DOF ( I think they call it wide anyway..LOL). The shallow DOF is when one particular subject in the photo is in focus and the rest is not. A Wide DOF is like a landscape, or wide shot, where everything is in focus. So shallow can mean the subject you want in focus can be anywhere in the photo, be it middle, front, or back. Meaning that if it is a flower in a field, you could have the front flowers blurred and the back flowers blurred, but the middle flowers would be in focus - and so forth. Front flowers in focus and back blurred, or just the back flowers in focus.

It simply means that only what you "intend" to be in focus, is in focus, and the rest is not.

The interesting thing about this challenge this time around, is there is NO advanced editing like there was in the other Shallow DOF challenge here. With advanced editing, and looking through those prior entries, I can see a LOT of cloning and blurring and things were done in Photoshop or PSP. This time it will have to be done in camera, and that is a challenge in itself.

Rose
12/18/2005 09:00:57 AM · #10
In your example Michael, I would say it's relative - people won't be making an absolute mathematical assessment of the amount of distance that is in focus.

e
12/18/2005 05:27:10 PM · #11
I am curious about what is shallow enough as well. Here is an example I took a few weeks ago. Is this shallow enough for everyone?
' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/14736/thumb/258177.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/14736/thumb/258177.jpg', '/') + 1) . '
12/18/2005 05:31:02 PM · #12
' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/40679/thumb/241096.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/40679/thumb/241096.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

I shot this one with F2.5 with a canon 50 mm lens. This might be shallow DoF, IMO ;)

edit: sorry, don't wanna shock anyone, but this is the only proper photo i have with this lens.

Message edited by author 2005-12-18 17:31:36.
12/18/2005 05:35:08 PM · #13
Originally posted by biteme:

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/40679/thumb/241096.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/40679/thumb/241096.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

I shot this one with F2.5 with a canon 50 mm lens. This might be shallow DoF, IMO ;)

edit: sorry, don't wanna shock anyone, but this is the only proper photo i have with this lens.


That is definitely a shallow DOF (probably just an inch or two), but mine is probably a few feet. Personally, I think anything which shows depth by having an in-focus subject with an out-of-focus background would qualify, but a general concensus would be nice before shooting.
12/18/2005 05:41:05 PM · #14
This is shallow DOF:

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/354/thumb/198150.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/354/thumb/198150.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/5112/thumb/252480.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/5112/thumb/252480.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/5112/thumb/245127.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/5112/thumb/245127.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

All three with the 105 mm macro at F2.8

12/18/2005 05:45:41 PM · #15
Originally posted by jpeters:

I am curious about what is shallow enough as well. Here is an example I took a few weeks ago. Is this shallow enough for everyone?
' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/14736/thumb/258177.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/14736/thumb/258177.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

I would not consider this shallow DOF.
12/18/2005 05:45:50 PM · #16
Originally posted by ursula:

This is shallow DOF:

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/354/thumb/198150.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/354/thumb/198150.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/5112/thumb/252480.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/5112/thumb/252480.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/5112/thumb/245127.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/5112/thumb/245127.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

All three with the 105 mm macro at F2.8


Hehe, these are definitely shallow DOF.. extreme cases thereof.

As many other have probably stated, Shallow DOF simply means having a portion of your photo in sharp focus, while the rest, either foreground or background, or (most commonly), both, are out of focus, are progressively going out of focus.

This can be as extreme as these samples, or it can be less extreme. One thing I would not consider a *shallow* DOF is say, a subject that is fully in focus, with only a background far behind them out of focus.
12/18/2005 05:47:46 PM · #17
' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/319/thumb/156782.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/319/thumb/156782.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' also the micro 105mm
12/18/2005 05:49:10 PM · #18
Originally posted by Artyste:



Hehe, these are definitely shallow DOF.. extreme cases thereof.

As many other have probably stated, Shallow DOF simply means having a portion of your photo in sharp focus, while the rest, either foreground or background, or (most commonly), both, are out of focus, are progressively going out of focus.

This can be as extreme as these samples, or it can be less extreme. One thing I would not consider a *shallow* DOF is say, a subject that is fully in focus, with only a background far behind them out of focus.


Okie dokie. I could go along with that.
12/18/2005 05:50:46 PM · #19
LOVE the fork, Ursula. Left comment.
12/18/2005 07:04:22 PM · #20
3mm or less.
12/18/2005 07:11:24 PM · #21
WHEW! Took my shots today of the subject I had all picked out, and I am VERY pleased with it. I wish the rest of you well in the challenge!

Rose
12/18/2005 07:32:45 PM · #22
By the way, a subject does not have to be in the middle of a photo to be Shallow DOF, ie the pill example or others below. It can be the subject you are trying to portray only in the background, or only in the foreground as well. In this case below, I am showcasing the food, and would have called it "Iams" had I entered it.

Not even close to my actual entry, but was one test shot I did over the past few days when learning Shallow DOF. I don't know how to make it smaller and a clickable link to the larger in my port. Hope it isn't too large.

Rose

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/47117/thumb/270525.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/47117/thumb/270525.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

Message edited by ursula - replacing large image with thumbnail.
12/18/2005 08:40:57 PM · #23
Originally posted by Artyste:



One thing I would not consider a *shallow* DOF is say, a subject that is fully in focus, with only a background far behind them out of focus.



Why not?
12/18/2005 08:43:25 PM · #24
Originally posted by Rose8699:

By the way, a subject does not have to be in the middle of a photo to be Shallow DOF, ie the pill example or others below.


Neither the pill example nor others are "in the middle of a photo".
12/18/2005 08:43:49 PM · #25
Originally posted by Rose8699:

WHEW! Took my shots today of the subject I had all picked out, and I am VERY pleased with it. I wish the rest of you well in the challenge!

Rose


Thank you Rose
Pages:  
Current Server Time: 07/26/2021 09:50:48 AM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2021 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 07/26/2021 09:50:48 AM EDT.