DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> Do comments bother you?
Pages:  
Showing posts 1 - 25 of 62, (reverse)
AuthorThread
01/13/2006 08:57:58 PM · #1
Some people state that they love comments on their entries. Some, although they like them, think they are off base a lot of the time, as in not being constructive - like "nice shot", "its a DNMC", "comments on the border or frame and not photo", etc. Nothing constructive is really in the contents.

Today I wrote to my family member I use as my muse, so to speak, when I take photography. I send him a lot of my shots. Some I send to him are entered in contests before I even ask for his critique, but I seek it sometimes from him as well, if I feel the need for it; some I send just cause he wants me to send him what I do so he can watch my progress; and some I send are of Florida, which are his favorites most of the time, since he lives in Connecticut and loves to see this part of the country.

Anyway, I sent him my candid entry today just for giggles. I told him it would probably bomb here, and why. I also told him of some comments I received on my Burst of Color and my Backlighting entry. The good and the bad. He then proceeded to tell me this little story.

This relative has been in photography longer than I have been alive, and I am 46. So if you are feeling down about comments, this might make you smile, as it did me.

I wouldn't let the criticism bother you. Let me tell you a story.
I was walking up a mountain trail one day with a friend of mine. He fell behind and when I turned to find him I got a terrific shot of him, backlit in autumn. I had it printed 8x11, framed and submitted to a photo club I used to belong to. Once a month they used to bring in a "professional" to judge the photos. When she came to mine she didn't like it because the framer had left a hair or thread in the frame. She never critiqued the picture.

That same day one of the ladies in the class had submitted a picture of a field with a weathered barn. The critique centered on the fact that it would have been a more interesting picture had the photographer gotten close to the barn and shot the weathered wood. The point, however, is that again she did not critique the photo that was. She critiqued the photo that didn't exist.

In an even more extreme case I went to a play once, written by a friend of a friend. We were, of course, interested in the review. When the review came out it was all about how the action on the stage was played in counterpoint to a dirty rag that was on the stage and how that contrast highlighted the play's meaning. Needless to say the dirty rag didn't have anything to do with the play. It was left there by accident by a stagehand.

The point is that criticism is cheap and critics don't pay for their tickets.

Take your pictures and believe in them.


Now, I am not talking about the 'indepth' critique one gets from the Critique Club, in which I myself am a member, for those that care to have their photos critiqued. The critique club's guidelines are to critique everything about the photo, including the entire photo, the emotion it gives, and of course, the technicals as well.

What I am talking about is the little one liners we all get and don't care for in the comments to our entries. The ones where you just want to SHAKE the person who wrote it and say "WHAT????".

In that story, the last two sentences I find to be the most important. Forget about the comments given in that manner, is my take on it. Just take the pictures YOU love and YOU believe in, and don't worry about critics who didn't pay the price YOU did to take it.

Rose
01/13/2006 09:13:45 PM · #2
Hehe, interesting point and I frankly agree, of course I listen to comments and I embrace them as they give me a little insight in how other people experience my photos but mostly I am doing this for me, myself and I.

I must admit that a handful of comments that I have gotten have irritated me but a vast majority of them don´t bother me in the least. If you don´t have anything but a one liner to say about one of my shots, then so be it, it´s still better than nothing so keep em coming but of course I appreciate the longer ones better.
01/13/2006 09:19:09 PM · #3
Very nice stories.
I personally like any type of comments. If people leave comments that mean my picture draws some attention.
01/13/2006 09:20:55 PM · #4
I find the comments that are truly beneficial the ones that I can use to IMPROVE my future photographs, so I'd have to agree with you. Comments about different angles, suggestions on DOF, etc. are so useful to beginners like myself because most of us (hopefully) are here to improve our skills.
Usually when I comment on a highly-rated photo, I like to point out at least two specific things, even if it's something as simple as color or lighting. Some people go through great lengths to include details and I think it's important to know those details weren't ignored/unseen.
Just my .02.
01/13/2006 09:26:42 PM · #5
I've found most comments I receive to be very helpful. I just wish sometimes there was a little more explanation. Like for instance, "you should use levels to make this pop", how? I suck at photoshop, so most of my images are straight out of the camera except for some cropping, sharpening and resizing. The photoshop tutorials just confuse me. I wish I had someone who could actually "show me" how to use it! The only other thing is a lot of times you get conflicting advice. I go back alot of times and try everything that was suggested.
01/13/2006 09:33:09 PM · #6
I agree with the long and good commenters and such. I disagree that any comment is a welcome comment though.

Of course a photo in a competition is going to draw attention, but for someone to simply write something like "sally, is that you?" or "drop the border" is really to me better left unsaid. I don't regard that as any compliment that my photo brought attention to them when it has no baring on the photo, or on the photographer. These are the comments I am referring to.

Also, I find little solice, even when I first started out, by having one person say "great dof, and great saturation", only to have the next comment say "needs better dof, and a bit less saturation would have been better". Conflicting comments do not help newbies, or pros, or even the in betweens IMO.

I know that you should see who is making what comment and take into consideration their comment based on experience and don't take it if you feel they are inexperienced. At least that is the general conclusion I have come to when reading others say that. BUT, it doesn't matter who is experienced. AS per the story, a "pro" photograher can be just as off base as any other.

Now I am not saying that I will ONLY listen to my relative..LOL.but certainly I don't want to hear about threads and hairs on a frame either. There are some here that I believe give some great and interesting critiquing comments. But personally speaking, most are not. :)

Rose
01/13/2006 09:56:40 PM · #7
Most comments are ridiculous. Like ya know if you had added a jet plane flying through or if you could have moved the bridge it would be better. Or I don not like red suspenders- you should have had that stranger put on blue ones. you get the idea. The comments that i enjoy are the ones where the viewer "gets" the photo and and does not try to advise on how to make a completely different one but gives constructive advice on composition, saturation etc. The very best go a step further with post processing advice. I have entered a lot of poor photos and a few decent ones. I must say that I always learn more from the "Stinkers" than I do from the decent ones.
One more thing. People always complain that there aren't enough comments left. For me, I leave very few comments because I do not really know enough to comment constructively. One day perhaps, I will achieve a certain level of accomplishment and confidence to leave worthwhile comments for others.
--jrjr

Message edited by author 2006-01-13 21:57:52.
01/13/2006 09:59:24 PM · #8
Originally posted by Rose8699:

Also, I find little solice, even when I first started out, by having one person say "great dof, and great saturation", only to have the next comment say "needs better dof, and a bit less saturation would have been better". Conflicting comments do not help newbies, or pros, or even the in betweens IMO.


Unfortunately, during a challenge anyway, most of us are not psychic or clairvoyant enough to know what others have commented about, so this particular statement is just not making sense to me. How on earth do we know if, or when, our comments conflict with others' comments?

Originally posted by Rose8699:

I know that you should see who is making what comment and take into consideration their comment based on experience and don't take it if you feel they are inexperienced. At least that is the general conclusion I have come to when reading others say that. BUT, it doesn't matter who is experienced. AS per the story, a "pro" photograher can be just as off base as any other.

There are some here that I believe give some great and interesting critiquing comments. But personally speaking, most are not. :)


You can always take comments with a grain of salt, whether they be from someone on the site who is a veteran or someone who just registered yesterday...but whether or not those comments are "great and interesting," any time you move someone enough for them to take a moment to comment on your picture is important and should be valued.

Commenting on other people's photography is exactly what helps us to get better, learn new things, and to foster our growth, whether we have been doing this a day or a lifetime. Commenting is what helps people understand the language and terminology that is bantered about constantly by the regulars, but seems Greek to those who are just picking up a camera for the first time.

I think that posts like this one are exactly what discourage comments from a lot of people around here, new or veteran.

Message edited by author 2006-01-13 22:02:37.
01/13/2006 10:08:36 PM · #9
I agree 100% with what Laurie said, if you don't want comments why even be a user of this site? Its one of the key things that make this site so great. I love to get honest comments the critize and break it down for me, they are the best kind! A post like this only makes it harder for the people who do constructive critism comments not to post them.
01/13/2006 10:09:36 PM · #10
So many people say that feedback like "Great! That is a lovely photo" is actually not very helpful.

I disagree. It may not be the most in-depth comment, but so often we hope that someone will like our photo, perhaps see beauty in it.

So if we are told that we DID manage what we had set out to do, then surely that is useful feedback?

As to going into great detail about postprocessing: you can't teach someone the ins and outs of Photoshop in the comment boxes. Those are for tips and pointers, it is up to YOU to learn what to do with them (but I sure agree it would be nice to have someone sit here and SHOW me).
01/13/2006 10:10:34 PM · #11
I want to SO comment on this issue but I don't have anything good to say so I will just say.. the DOF of this thread is off just a bit. 8~\
but I like the depth of it.
01/13/2006 10:11:11 PM · #12
You guys are absolutely right. I have learned an awful lot from this site and comments are the most impotant component of that.
--jrjr
01/13/2006 10:36:28 PM · #13
I appreciate any and all comments.
01/13/2006 10:39:25 PM · #14
As to going into great detail about postprocessing: you can't teach someone the ins and outs of Photoshop in the comment boxes. Those are for tips and pointers, it is up to YOU to learn what to do with them (but I sure agree it would be nice to have someone sit here and SHOW me).

I understand that, it was just wishful thinking ;) Someday soon I'm hoping to take a class or something.
01/13/2006 10:50:18 PM · #15
It really depends on the comment, in all honesty... Things like "More focus" when the photo is clear and well focused make me want to tell people to get some glasses. ;o) I do appreciate when people tell me they like a photo, and I especially enjoy comments that offer advice as to how to make a photo better...a different crop, more/less DoF, different post editing, etc... After all, it is my ultimate goal to improve!

Its rare that a comment would bother me...I am perhaps a little old school, in that if there is something off about a photo, instead of just saying "this is bad" or "that is wrong", say that, but offer a solution or a pointer as to how to fix that.

Message edited by author 2006-01-13 22:53:36.
01/13/2006 10:55:58 PM · #16
I'll toss in a few points here...

I don't often comment on technicals, even when doing a CC. I will make comments when there is something blatantly wrong technically, but that doesn't seem to happen often. Technicals are just as subjective as the artwork itself in many cases. You remember that comment you made about the critique giver not critiquing the image but focusing on one element of it that you considered irrelevant? This applies here too. A bad border can ruin an image. If you include a border, it is part of the entire presentation and should be treated that way.

We each have our own ideas about giving critique. Technicals are easy to comment on for most of us. Where I find critique to be lacking is on how the critique giver perceives the image... it's meaning... it's message...

I love to receive critique. I have made a few new friends here in town lately who give me great critique. The critique I get from them has been far more valuable than any I have received online (at any website.) The reason this critique is more valuable to me is because those who are giving it to me are not photographers and they know nothing about photography. They are artists though. Two of them are painters... one with oil and the other with watercolor. The third is a metal sculptor. They know absolutely nothing about how a photograph is executed, but they have enough training in art that they can give me very useful feedback on my images. The first thing I usually hear from them is an emotional reaction to the photo.

I think that technical critique is valuable to a new photographer though. I just think it needs to be balanced with other types of feedback.
01/13/2006 11:01:13 PM · #17
Not sure this fits, but sometimes I get comments that make me laugh because the commenter will say something like "it would look better with the horse on the other side of the hay bale...". I think to myself, yep - you're right...next time I'll ask that horse to move. ;^)
01/13/2006 11:11:39 PM · #18
While it may be a sign of the apocalypse, I agree with Rose.

For the most part.


01/13/2006 11:48:02 PM · #19
Originally posted by jmsetzler:

We each have our own ideas about giving critique. Technicals are easy to comment on for most of us. Where I find critique to be lacking is on how the critique giver perceives the image... it's meaning... it's message...

I think that many of the one-line or one-word comments that get handed out here are just that--an expression of how the critique giver perceives the artistic aspects of the photo. In other words, they're saying they love it, or they hate it, or whatever. I imagine that many here simply do not feel qualified to give an informed opinion on the technical aspects of a photo, and even less qualified to comment on the photo's artistic aspects. Few are going to be willing to go out on a limb with an unknown photo/photographer and makes statements that may sound silly, or be totally off base. I think most people are deathly afraid of appearing foolish, even to total strangers that they'll probably never meet.


01/13/2006 11:50:52 PM · #20
Originally posted by Spazmo99:

While it may be a sign of the apocalypse, I agree with Rose.

Wow! Maybe you should lie down and have someone check your temperature. :)


01/13/2006 11:52:54 PM · #21
Originally posted by micknewton:

Originally posted by jmsetzler:

We each have our own ideas about giving critique. Technicals are easy to comment on for most of us. Where I find critique to be lacking is on how the critique giver perceives the image... it's meaning... it's message...

I think that many of the one-line or one-word comments that get handed out here are just that--an expression of how the critique giver perceives the artistic aspects of the photo. In other words, they're saying they love it, or they hate it, or whatever. I imagine that many here simply do not feel qualified to give an informed opinion on the technical aspects of a photo, and even less qualified to comment on the photo's artistic aspects. Few are going to be willing to go out on a limb with an unknown photo/photographer and makes statements that may sound silly, or be totally off base. I think most people are deathly afraid of appearing foolish, even to total strangers that they'll probably never meet.


I think this is a common misconception actually. I agree that people are afraid of appearing foolish, but a critique is nothing more than an opinion. Opinions vary, obviously. I find some critiques to be foolish, but I accept them as that person's point of view. I know my point of view has changed since I started making photos. Our points of view evlove with our own photography and interests.

We can't worry ourselves with how our critiques will be perceived. The only guideline I set for my own critiques is simple. I don't say anything that I wouldn't want to hear about my own work.
01/13/2006 11:53:53 PM · #22
Sometimes, I think the one word critiques are enough. I can look at a photo and KNOW that I like it. A detailed description of how I feel about it may be beyond the words I have at my disposal. I can either keep my silence, in which case, the photographer will never know I appreciate his work. I can leave a comment like "Wow!" or "Great" of something. That photograph may prompt a great deal of thought that eventually leads to the possibility of a more detailed analysis, but often, the mystery is unsolvable.
01/14/2006 12:00:42 AM · #23
Originally posted by Spazmo99:

Sometimes, I think the one word critiques are enough. I can look at a photo and KNOW that I like it. A detailed description of how I feel about it may be beyond the words I have at my disposal. I can either keep my silence, in which case, the photographer will never know I appreciate his work. I can leave a comment like "Wow!" or "Great" of something. That photograph may prompt a great deal of thought that eventually leads to the possibility of a more detailed analysis, but often, the mystery is unsolvable.


Time is the real issue. Those who feel compelled to comment would likely give much more in depth review of 10 photographs rather than 500.
01/14/2006 12:21:26 AM · #24
just dumb ones, like this:-

Composition is ok. The subject matter could have been better. ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/427/thumb/273908.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/427/thumb/273908.jpg', '/') + 1) . '
01/14/2006 12:23:32 AM · #25
Originally posted by goodman:

just dumb ones, like this:-

Composition is ok. The subject matter could have been better. ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/427/thumb/273908.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/427/thumb/273908.jpg', '/') + 1) . '


I received the exact same comment, and saw it in several other entries I happened to browse. We have a cut 'n paste commenter working on his stats here. One comment fits all.

R.
Pages:  
Current Server Time: 09/28/2021 10:27:59 PM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2021 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 09/28/2021 10:27:59 PM EDT.