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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> Up-sizing
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05/16/2006 09:15:30 PM · #1
Ok, I have an image that is document size 11.378 X 17.067 resolution 180 and/or pixel dimensions 2048 X 3072.

I would like to make this image a document size of 16 X 24 with a print resolution of 300 dpi. (without loosing quality)

If there is anyone that can explain how to do this and you have the time would you please explain how?

I have read a lot of material on the subject but am still having a mental block on how to do this.

Message edited by author 2006-05-16 21:16:01.
05/16/2006 09:21:07 PM · #2
Did you see this tutorial?
05/16/2006 09:23:03 PM · #3
Or this one?
05/16/2006 10:02:03 PM · #4
There's also third-party software available.
05/16/2006 11:16:33 PM · #5
Great info that the other guys posted. One more thought (well, you may have thought of this and in fact be doing it so sorry if I'm pointing out someting that you already know:) Set your camera to shoot the largest file size. Its always better, quality wise, to decrease the image size rather than increase it.
05/18/2006 06:28:55 PM · #6
Thank you for the links to the two articles, they are very informative and I have read both in the past. I understand the method of increasing the physical size of an image. What the articles lacks or a lack of understanding on my part is what effect is there on the image if you simply increase the resolution or (dpi, which is what I understand the resolution field in photoshop to represent) from 180 to 300.
05/18/2006 08:10:35 PM · #7
Does everyone have a mental block on this subject? Someone must have an opinion?
05/18/2006 08:25:24 PM · #8
You're going to have "some" loss in quality when upsizing a photo. Different method can minimize that loss.

Programs like Genuine Fractals can do a very good job with up-scaling.

A one-step 180-300 dpi jump isn't reccommended. Instead, do the up-sizing in steps to minimize quality loss. For instance, resample the image to 200 dpi, then to 220 dpi and so forth.

Your saviour is that prints THAT large aren't meant to be viewed at close distance, so you can get away with "less than perfect" photos.
05/18/2006 09:32:13 PM · #9
Originally posted by fotomann_forever:

A one-step 180-300 dpi jump isn't reccommended. Instead, do the up-sizing in steps to minimize quality loss. For instance, resample the image to 200 dpi, then to 220 dpi and so forth.

If you are using Photoshop CS or PSElements 4, then it is now recommended that you upsample in one step using the Bicubic Smoother option, rather than upsizing in 5% or 10% increments.
05/19/2006 11:39:00 AM · #10
Thanks very much that is the answer I was looking for. Again thanks for your time
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