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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Wide Angle Question
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07/18/2006 02:14:18 PM · #1
I have a Tamron SP 11-18mm... I have no filters for it yet, What I need to know is,, How effective is a CP filter on a lens like this? Is it worth spending 50-60 dollars on one? I will be shooting alot of outdoors landscape etc with this lens as well as alot of night shots.

Any help will earn you bucket loads of appreciation.


07/18/2006 02:19:22 PM · #2
It isn't that a CP isn't effective on a WA lens. It is that you are bound to get vignetting. So if a) you can correct it in processing or b) like the look, then it will be just fine.
07/18/2006 02:28:08 PM · #3
whats vignetting ?
07/18/2006 02:28:45 PM · #4
I have heard from others that the CP isnt very effective, however the guy at our local camera store says he never shoots outdoors with out a CP and highly recommended that i get a filter for this lens. perhaps he is just trying for a sale, or isn't being very nice to me because he knows I didn't purchase this lens from his store.

one of my wifes close friends who is very good photographer said she tends to leave the filters off wide angle lenses, She also told me that none of her wide angle lenses zoom out so perhaps that has something to do with it? I have alot to learn.
07/18/2006 02:33:59 PM · #5
Spend the $$$ and get a CP designed for use on a wide angle lens. I use the Hoya S-HMC Pro. They are much thinner.

They can be had much cheaper then B&H on Ebay from the Chinese sellers, but they are still not cheap.
07/18/2006 02:34:07 PM · #6
Shooting with a CP all the time sounds suspect. It adds something like a stop to the scene, darkening it. I use mine a lot around sunset to do longer exposures. Is it worth having one, if you're going to shoot outdoors a lot - probably. As for the wide angle issue, you'll likely get some vignetting around the corners, but it may be worth it at times. But I don't have a super-wide, so I'm just repeating second hand info.
07/18/2006 02:38:56 PM · #7
The angle of the sun determines the intensity of the CP's effect, it's a maximum at 90 degrees. Since a wide angle covers a lot of sky you will have a darkening effect across the sky as the angle to the sun changes. You won't notice this on a normal (50mm) lens.
07/18/2006 02:39:06 PM · #8
I have the 12-24mm lens and use the CP often. However, I cannot use it with a 2nd filter (UV, etc.) without getting vingetting. By itself, I have no problems.

I like using it for outdoor shots and for slowing down the shutter speeds. It definately serves a purpose.

Becky
07/18/2006 02:39:17 PM · #9
alright i think a few of you have answsered my question or at very least helped me make up my mind. thanks ...

I have CP's for all my other lenses so not having one for this lens has sort of made me feel naked. I will have to venture into Milwaukee this weekend and pick one up, No way am I going back to the local store to have them say I told you so. I will prob save 15-20% by going to one of the big dogs and have a bigger selection to choose from.

Message edited by author 2006-07-18 14:47:25.
07/18/2006 02:46:33 PM · #10
this is one of the things I had heard also which led me to ask the question.

Originally posted by Raziel:

The angle of the sun determines the intensity of the CP's effect, it's a maximum at 90 degrees. Since a wide angle covers a lot of sky you will have a darkening effect across the sky as the angle to the sun changes. You won't notice this on a normal (50mm) lens.

07/18/2006 02:56:30 PM · #11
Ya, definitely a "gradiant" effect accross the sky at the wide end.
07/18/2006 03:03:24 PM · #12
Here's a link with an example pic:

//www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/polarizers.shtml

I have seen much more pronounced examples, but can't find one right off hand. With the angle of view somewhere in the neighborhood of 100 degrees, it's going to be a fairly noticeable "gradient" most of the time.

However, if you aren't including a lot of sky, it can still be useful for taming reflections on water/glass/foilage, etc... I wouldn't think the gradient would be as noticeable in those situations.
07/18/2006 03:38:37 PM · #13
A little sky gradient can be easily fixed in PP, but the problems that will be there without using a polariser cannot be fixed in editing. So I would suggest using a CP.
07/18/2006 03:55:42 PM · #14
On the extreme WA lenses you MUST buy a "low profile" or "thin" polarizing filter; the regular ones are too deep, and they WILL vignette at the wide end. The remarks re: graduated darkening of the sky are absolutely correct; there's no way to avoid it when polarizing at such a wide angle. But the polarizer is still very useful in controlling the scattered light off of solid objects, effectively saturating and purifying colors.

R.
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