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DPChallenge Forums >> Individual Photograph Discussion >> Hurricane Isabelle Photograph
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09/18/2003 04:33:10 PM · #1
In the post below by undieyatch he added the following link //urbanlegends.about.com/library/bl_isabel_photo.htm

It appears many have been missled. This photo is reportedly real but not Hurricane Isabelle as noted.

The photo credited to Steve Todd, actually documents a tropical cyclone in the Pacific Ocean six months earlier named "Graham."


But it is still a great photograph.

' . substr('//home.comcast.net/~rlholdensr/dpc/isabelle.jpg', strrpos('//home.comcast.net/~rlholdensr/dpc/isabelle.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

undieyatch thanks for the info.


Calvus

Message edited by author 2003-09-18 22:45:43.
09/18/2003 04:35:21 PM · #2
Wow! An amazing capture of the storm. Thanks for sharing! :-)
09/18/2003 05:04:22 PM · #3
Great photo! You can see why people say 'the calm before the storm', the water is flat and very calm.


09/18/2003 05:04:25 PM · #4
That's heading MY WAY?!

*run*

M
09/18/2003 05:09:19 PM · #5
I always check snopes.com when I see topical hey-wow photos like this being distributed without specific information. 9 out of 10 times they turn out to be fake. Many are electronically altered, but most are at least mislabeled and misleading.

No answer on this one yet, but I'll stay tuned to //www.snopes.com/photos/isabel.asp to find out where this photo came from and whether it's really this hurricane (or any hurricane) or not.

09/18/2003 05:24:29 PM · #6
I'm fairly certain this photo is fake. First of all, hurricanes are not so clearly defined. Tornado's can have that effect - you can see a clearly defined tornado. Hurricanes, however, don't work that way. They are more gradual from the edge to the middle.

Second, even if it were clearly defined like that, this hurricane is hundreds of miles across. You wouldn't be able to see the curvature of the edge, because it's too big.

Third, ships were all evactuated days ago from port, and no ship has been sailing in that part of the atlantic for weeks because that thing has been out there for a while.

Great simulation, but not genuine.
09/18/2003 05:45:06 PM · #7
Oh god fooled again!!


09/18/2003 05:50:39 PM · #8
Originally posted by chinstrap:

Oh god fooled again!!


true and the water wouldnt be that calm. isabella has been pushing 20-30 ft swells in front of her all week.
very cool pic tho. :)

Message edited by author 2003-09-18 17:51:29.
09/18/2003 06:07:15 PM · #9
Hoh! That is a crazy pic! Looks like a machine.
Thanks for sharing.
09/18/2003 06:09:04 PM · #10
Ok, I'm easily fooled - being from Arizona, I'll believe just about anything when it comes to the ocean and water. Don't have much to base fact on. :-)

Cool pic anyways

Message edited by author 2003-09-18 18:09:41.
09/18/2003 06:17:20 PM · #11
That is really freaking awesome! Amazing shot!!!!

And then I read further down and learn that it might be a fake...eeck!

This from someone who is getting beaten up by Isabel as we speak...thankfully I'm much further inland...and I still have power! How long that lasts, remains to be seen!

Good luck to everyone else from NC to DC having to deal with the aftermath of this storm!

Message edited by author 2003-09-18 18:18:46.
09/18/2003 06:56:37 PM · #12
that is a cool shot... i got it via email about 30 minutes ago.....

funny how fast this stuff makes its rounds

James
09/18/2003 07:27:31 PM · #13
The photo is labeled wrong but it is not a fake. Therefore I won't remove it. It is just another email scam. But it is a great photograph


Calvus

Message edited by author 2003-09-18 22:48:20.
09/18/2003 07:51:05 PM · #14
I would be the last person to say the photo is a fake but there is one thing that bugs me the ocean is to calm to be that close to the hurricane and to be in the eye of the storm even then the seas would be very choppy. Please correct me if I am wrong but shouldn't the ocean be very rough and choppy.
09/18/2003 07:58:22 PM · #15
Calvus, don't sweat it. It happens to the best of us. It certainly looks like a breathtaking shot. I guess this would be why a lot of folks are afraid to crack open the spot-editing door. (Ooops, don't want to start that debate again!) :)
09/18/2003 08:25:35 PM · #16
Looks fake to me
like this one
' . substr('//www.snopes.com/photos/graphics/bigcat.jpg', strrpos('//www.snopes.com/photos/graphics/bigcat.jpg', '/') + 1) . '
09/18/2003 08:30:41 PM · #17
The hurricane photo doesn't look fake to me. I think the question is whether or not it's actually the 'current' hurricane maybe. I don't see anything in that photo that makes it appear to be 'fake'.
09/18/2003 09:32:51 PM · #18
Take it from a guy who has spent some time on the water. You can see strange things out there. I've been caught in "instant" squalls and thunderstorms and been caught up in fog rolling in so fast that you couldn't outrun it even if you paddled your heart out.

The clouds seen in the picture could be associated to the hurricane. Telltale weather can preceed large storms like this for hundreds of miles. A storm as big as Isabel will cause perturbations on an unbelievable scale. What were seeing is most likely not the hurricane itself, but could be a weather disturbance caused by the hurricane. Have you ever driven on a highway through a thunderstorm and then all of a sudden pop out of it and on to bone dry pavement? This could be a similar type of phenomena.

This photo could be fake, but it could also be real. Until it's proven otherwise, I'm leaning towards that it may be real.
09/18/2003 09:38:18 PM · #19
I tend to believe it's real, too (I posted this shot in another thread not knowing this one had been posted a few minutes earlier). As for whether it's a shot of Isabel, I can't say.

I remember flying into Orlando as Hurricane Georges (sp?) was approaching in 1997-ish, and the sky was pretty wild-looking. The pilot told us that the clouds we were seeing were the leading edge of the storm. They didn't mirror this, but the leading edge of the storm was definitely quite well defined.
09/18/2003 09:39:08 PM · #20
What if it's the 'back' of the hurricane?
09/18/2003 09:39:14 PM · #21
' . substr('//www.vonautsch.com/hurricane.jpg', strrpos('//www.vonautsch.com/hurricane.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

I don't know if it's fake or not, but the clouds seen in the photo could be the far outter ring of Isabelle as shown in this photo taken from the space station with the arrow. There's a wall of clouds where the arrow points. It's not unbelievable to see storms like that. There've been formations (to a smaller scale) like that here in northwest Ohio during the summer season.
09/18/2003 09:54:47 PM · #22
My son wrote back to me and said:

No it's legit - it's on that back side of the storm. It's a barge coming from either Iraq or Saudi. I can't remember for sure....

Tell them it's true. Some of the pipeline ad planner people have spent time on barges and tankers - they were telling similar stories.

Calvus
09/18/2003 10:23:02 PM · #23
I got this from my nephew.....
.................

Actually tropic strorm Graham:

//urbanlegends.about.com/library/bl_isabel_photo.htm
09/18/2003 10:38:55 PM · #24
Unless there are two suns over there on the east coast, it's fake. You can usually tell by the light, as it's hardest to fake the light. Look at the light hitting the tanker...it's coming from the front, just like the sunset in the background would show. However, the light hitting the storm clouds is sourced from the right, behind where the tanker is. The clouds are lit differently than would be expected.

Furthermore, whether this is the eye of the hurricane or not, there would be large swells generated by the storm. I'd also tend to think that tankers would stay away from that stuff well ahead of time. They know where it is.
09/18/2003 10:46:27 PM · #25
Originally posted by jimmythefish:

Unless there are two suns over there on the east coast, it's fake. You can usually tell by the light, as it's hardest to fake the light. Look at the light hitting the tanker...it's coming from the front, just like the sunset in the background would show. However, the light hitting the storm clouds is sourced from the right, behind where the tanker is. The clouds are lit differently than would be expected.

Furthermore, whether this is the eye of the hurricane or not, there would be large swells generated by the storm. I'd also tend to think that tankers would stay away from that stuff well ahead of time. They know where it is.


Sorry to "rain on your parade" for the light source theory, but a sky much clearer of clouds will generate more light. The sky is lighter on the right, the ship is lit from the right and so are the clouds. The clouds look dark because they are dark, dense and loaded with water vapor and thus "absorbing" more ambient light. It's even darker to the far left since the rain is probably coming down in sheets. My guess is that it's raining cats and dogs under those low clouds.

I still think it's real.
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