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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Cleaning lenses
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09/26/2003 04:37:30 PM · #1
Ok so what's the proper way to clean a lens?
Typically I just fog it with some steamy breath and wipe in a circle with my cotton tee shirt... I know bunches of you are cringing at the thought of that. So please help!

Message edited by author 2003-09-26 16:38:38.
09/26/2003 04:38:37 PM · #2
pick up a pack of lens cleaning tissues, or a lens cleaning kit
09/26/2003 04:39:55 PM · #3
Yeah well I'm poor and it's just a junk little camera.
Is there a free way?
09/26/2003 04:42:50 PM · #4
I use a blow brush and a lens pen (Lenspen®), and, like Kali, a lil breath when needed.
Most of all, I look at the lens, before cleaning...

I'd have no hesitation using a very clean cotton T-shirt either.

Message edited by author 2003-09-26 16:44:46.
09/26/2003 04:43:26 PM · #5
you could try steamy breath and a cotton t-shirt. any clean soft lint free cloth should do
09/26/2003 04:46:20 PM · #6
So there isn't really a special way? Like when you clean a cd you wipe circular or in a straight line from center to outter edges.
09/26/2003 04:50:18 PM · #7
Originally posted by Kali:

So there isn't really a special way? Like when you clean a cd you wipe circular or in a straight line from center to outter edges.


I wipe in a circular motion, because the chance of picking up a grain of sand or something similarly minute is reduced. It seems fairly efficient too, considering my lens is equally circular.
09/26/2003 04:54:26 PM · #8
cool, thanks... so I'm not really doing anything wrong.
All it takes is common sense 'eh!
09/26/2003 04:55:49 PM · #9
I've heard that spit has special cleansing properties - true?
09/26/2003 04:59:13 PM · #10
Cheapest way and also the way recommended by NYIP is to use a soft old towel or a piece of a tee shirt and the moisture of your breath. They also recommend a light spray of rubbing alcohol to remove the greasy build up from fingers. But for filters they suggest a little dish soap and warm water and drying with a towel on a regular basis.

Those so called lens cleaning tissues aren't all that good watch what the camera shop uses when you go in to look at cameras or if you have a problem watch what they use it will either be a small soft towel or one of those expensive white gloves which are the same gloves you can buy in a fine women's accessory shop, for about $10 a pair and they sale them in the camera shop's Michel Jackson style (only one glove) for $7 to $10.
09/26/2003 05:03:02 PM · #11
Originally posted by jerrft:

I've heard that spit has special cleansing properties - true?

That's for keeping goggles from fogging while swimming and for wiping a baby's face.
09/26/2003 05:04:19 PM · #12
Originally posted by Kali:

Originally posted by jerrft:

I've heard that spit has special cleansing properties - true?

That's for keeping goggles from fogging while swimming and for wiping a baby's face.


actually the spit doesn't have special cleansing properties but the heat from your breath does.
09/26/2003 05:05:10 PM · #13
Originally posted by jerrft:

I've heard that spit has special cleansing properties - true?


I'm sure the enzyemes in your saliva will be a treat for the coatings.

Breathing on the glass is okay, as the condensation is likely to be pretty pure. I wouldn't spit on them though....
09/26/2003 05:06:22 PM · #14
Originally posted by jerrft:

I've heard that spit has special cleansing properties - true?

I don't think it has cleansing properties, but perhaps an anti-fogging action.

In the past I found those white cotton gloves used at one-hour photo shops can be bought in bulk for a few dollars a dozen (not well-made -- meant to be used for a little while and discarded). Look for a wholesale photo or graphic arts supplier.
09/26/2003 05:16:42 PM · #15
Link to Cotton Glove Supplier.
09/26/2003 05:17:03 PM · #16
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by jerrft:

I've heard that spit has special cleansing properties - true?

I don't think it has cleansing properties, but perhaps an anti-fogging action.


Then I guess I should keep my tongue off the lens. Not to mention the viewfinder and display.
09/26/2003 05:19:14 PM · #17
Spit does have an advantageous effect if you are polishing shoes using a traditional paste-wax product.
09/26/2003 05:30:05 PM · #18
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Spit does have an advantageous effect if you are polishing shoes using a traditional paste-wax product.


Or when confronting a llama...
09/26/2003 05:32:19 PM · #19
Originally posted by zeuszen:

Originally posted by GeneralE:

Spit does have an advantageous effect if you are polishing shoes using a traditional paste-wax product.


Or when confronting a llama...

If you can out-spit a llama I'm staying far away from you!
09/26/2003 05:37:10 PM · #20
Originally posted by jerrft:

Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by jerrft:

I've heard that spit has special cleansing properties - true?

I don't think it has cleansing properties, but perhaps an anti-fogging action.


Then I guess I should keep my tongue off the lens. Not to mention the viewfinder and display.


' . substr('//www.dzynetrix.com/icon_rofl.gif', strrpos('//www.dzynetrix.com/icon_rofl.gif', '/') + 1) . 'You must really love your camera.
09/26/2003 05:49:29 PM · #21
I was advised once in another forum never to blow on the lens - as I recall because of the possibility of getting spit on the lens. Don't remember if a reason was given why that was bad, and don't really know the validity of the warning, but I've avoided it ever since.
09/26/2003 05:57:31 PM · #22
Originally posted by ScottK:

I was advised once in another forum never to blow on the lens - as I recall because of the possibility of getting spit on the lens. Don't remember if a reason was given why that was bad, and don't really know the validity of the warning, but I've avoided it ever since.


Chances are whoever told you not to blow also worked in a camera lab and got a commission for selling overpriced accessories. Again I am going to say this...NYIP (NEW YORK INSTITUE of PHOTOGRAPHY) Instructors recommend warm breath and a soft towel to clean a lens and in case of oily deposits from fingers on the lense to use alcohol. Use dish detergent for filters. NYIP Instructors aren't making a commission on selling cameras so why would they mislead a student with that recommendation? They are telling you from years and years of experience with it. If you are afraid to breath on it then use alcohol...it is the main ingredient in many window cleaners and also in those over priced one ounce bottles of lens cleaner.
09/26/2003 06:10:18 PM · #23
The only thing that ever goes on my multi-coated filters (which protect the front element on all of my lenses) is stuff designed specifically for the purpose of cleaning multi-coated optics. I've experienced first-hand the mess that results when you use anything else.

Message edited by author 2003-09-26 18:10:57.
09/26/2003 06:10:52 PM · #24
A lot of window cleaners use ammonia.
09/27/2003 02:14:22 AM · #25
Originally posted by OneSweetSin:

Chances are whoever told you not to blow also worked in a camera lab and got a commission for selling overpriced accessories.


Nope, just someone on an internet forum at the far end of the continent with nothing to gain from me. But I don't know who told them... :)
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