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DPChallenge Forums >> Photography Discussion >> cloudy pictures
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03/07/2007 07:45:15 PM · #1
I have noticed that if I shoot in the direction of the sun even slightly, then my pictures appear to be cloudy. Could this be caused by a dirty lens or is it normal? I don't remember this ever happening before, and I've been changing my lens more frequently, so it could be dirty. Any suggestions?
03/07/2007 07:48:46 PM · #2
Not very likely to be dirt, i would say try using a polariser.
03/07/2007 07:54:29 PM · #3
Aren't polarizers most effective at right angles to the sun? I'm not sure that will be the answer if the problem is shooting into the sun.
03/07/2007 08:07:21 PM · #4
try lowering the shutter speed of Ap. also, the XT's autofocus doesn't work to good under high light, try the manual
03/11/2007 10:55:08 AM · #5
thanks for the tips.
03/11/2007 11:05:15 AM · #6
try a lens hood


03/11/2007 11:12:12 AM · #7
I do not have a prob but use a UV filter and lens hood.
03/11/2007 11:13:49 AM · #8
Originally posted by miadrago:

I have noticed that if I shoot in the direction of the sun even slightly, then my pictures appear to be cloudy. Could this be caused by a dirty lens or is it normal? I don't remember this ever happening before, and I've been changing my lens more frequently, so it could be dirty. Any suggestions?


The more you shoot into the light, the more you introduce the possibility of "lens flare", the scattering of light back and forth between the elements of the lens. The result is a lowering of contr4ast and a "cloudy" appearance. The amount of lens flare you get will vary depending on the quality of the optics (modern lenses are coated to reduce flare, and more expensive lenses tend to have more effective coatings) and how clean the lens is. Glass surfaces tend to pick up a film over time that needs to be gently cleaned off, front and rear elements both.

You get the same effect with dirty eyeglasses, by the way.

R.
03/11/2007 11:16:23 AM · #9
it might just be lens flare, and you can do things to help with the problem but the only way to elimante it all together is to change the angle. lens flare happens when light comes directly into the lens. you may see it used creatively sometimes. Think of it like your car windshield, when there is dirt on it...it's hard to see out of, even if it's just a little bit. if you are driving into sunset you can't see either. if you are driving into the direction of the sun at all it's harder to see. try to fix it with that in mind. you have a lens hood, that helps but it might not be turned right or big enough. try putting your hand in the way of the sun...that is make shade on your lens with your hand, just keep it out of the shot.
03/11/2007 11:16:52 AM · #10
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by miadrago:

I have noticed that if I shoot in the direction of the sun even slightly, then my pictures appear to be cloudy. Could this be caused by a dirty lens or is it normal? I don't remember this ever happening before, and I've been changing my lens more frequently, so it could be dirty. Any suggestions?


The more you shoot into the light, the more you introduce the possibility of "lens flare", the scattering of light back and forth between the elements of the lens. The result is a lowering of contr4ast and a "cloudy" appearance. The amount of lens flare you get will vary depending on the quality of the optics (modern lenses are coated to reduce flare, and more expensive lenses tend to have more effective coatings) and how clean the lens is. Glass surfaces tend to pick up a film over time that needs to be gently cleaned off, front and rear elements both.

You get the same effect with dirty eyeglasses, by the way.

R.


lol you posted that when I was writing my post. sorry for the double info there.
03/11/2007 11:29:21 AM · #11
Originally posted by gi_joe05:

lol you posted that when I was writing my post. sorry for the double info there.


Yah :-)

It's worth noting that when most people think of "lens flare" they visualize a noticeable "streak" of light, or some sort of circular/polygonal artifact of light, but that's just the extreme case. A lower level of lens flare manifests itself as a loss of contrast, a general "haziness" of the image.

Someone else suggested a UV filter. This helps if the image is losing contrast due to atmospheric haze, but won't help with lens flare/light scatter in the lens elements at all. In fact, it just adds another layer of glass to contribute to the scattering. And only the very best (read most expensive) filters are as well-coated as good optical glass, so in general filters make the problem worse for most of us.

It goes without saying you need to be sure your filters are CLEAN, or I hope it does anyway. I don't use filters myself, except polarizers when needed.

R.
03/11/2007 01:55:17 PM · #12
a wider angle lens is going to be more suscetible to the cloudiness. side light is more of an issue with a wider angle lens, and overall contrast loss. a lens hood will help block this, letting most of the light reflect off the sbuject rather than be directed straight into the lens from the side, bypassing the subject.

Message edited by author 2007-03-11 13:56:06.
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