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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Monitor size
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06/10/2007 10:52:34 AM · #1
I'm thinking of upgrading my monitor... I use lightroom and CS3. I want to be able to have multiple large samples of images up at the same time for comparion. (lighroom is particularly good at that) So, I'm thinking of getting a 24 inch monitor but my wife said that would be too big. Think she is right? Is there "too big?"

Thanks, simpson.phanfare.com

Message edited by author 2007-06-10 10:53:48.
06/10/2007 10:57:50 AM · #2
First and most important --- YOUR WIFE IS ALWAYS RIGHT!

That said, I use a 21" monitor and it DOES feel cramped when I'm comparing several images at once. Perhaps you should buy one "the next size up" but tell wifey its 19" :)
06/10/2007 11:00:15 AM · #3
I don't think it's too big or big at all! I have a Dell 24" wide and I enjoy working on it, especially photography work. I have used 17" and 19" monitors before and I know I am not going back to them.
06/10/2007 11:07:43 AM · #4
There is no such thing as "too big" or "too high resolution" for photographic work. I run a 21" CRT (trinitron) at 2048x1536 resolution, and it's cramped. I want to install a dual monitor system next time around, keeping one monitor for my main photo work, and moving other apps and toolbars to the second monitor.
I'm not a huge fan of the wide screen monitors, because they are pretty narrow, and even the biggest of them have less vertical resolution than my current CRT. Makes working and viewing on portrait-oriented shots less easy.
One thing I am absolutely sure of. At the point that I switch away from CRT, I am going to be *very* careful about choosing the *right* LCD monitor(s) for the purpose. S-IPS panels and the ability to calibrate precisely are a must.
06/10/2007 01:41:09 PM · #5
Well I have a Samsung 22" Widescreen and my resoulution is set at 1680 X 1050 and I have tons of real estate.
06/10/2007 01:45:05 PM · #6
Originally posted by rex:

Well I have a Samsung 22" Widescreen and my resoulution is set at 1680 X 1050 and I have tons of real estate.

same here rex. 22" at same resolution. It's nice to have enough room to have two applications open and running side-by-side. Really helps when editing.
06/10/2007 01:50:55 PM · #7
Originally posted by swhiddon:

Originally posted by rex:

Well I have a Samsung 22" Widescreen and my resoulution is set at 1680 X 1050 and I have tons of real estate.

same here rex. 22" at same resolution. It's nice to have enough room to have two applications open and running side-by-side. Really helps when editing.


thas cool, i have the same samsung of 22" it is very very nice
06/10/2007 02:02:32 PM · #8
i have the dell 24". i find myself pining, though, for the days when i had multiple 19"s. i think that the psychological effect of more screen real estate is more pronounced when it comes on multiple monitors. i just ordered a 22" from newegg to supplement my 24".
06/10/2007 02:25:10 PM · #9
Originally posted by kirbic:

There is no such thing as "too big" or "too high resolution" for photographic work.

So true!
06/10/2007 02:54:58 PM · #10
Fritz has the right idea. I think dual monitors is the answer for photo work. I use a Dell 20" at 1600 x 1200 and my next move will be a second monitor of the same size. The Dell (at least when I bought mine) is a S-IPS panel so it calibrates well.
06/10/2007 03:02:30 PM · #11
Originally posted by kirbic:

S-IPS panels and the ability to calibrate precisely are a must.


What are S-IPS panels?
06/10/2007 03:15:00 PM · #12
Originally posted by idnic:

First and most important --- YOUR WIFE IS ALWAYS RIGHT!


And Cindi is single
*ducks and runs*
06/10/2007 03:24:37 PM · #13
Originally posted by Keith Maniac:

Originally posted by kirbic:

S-IPS panels and the ability to calibrate precisely are a must.


What are S-IPS panels?


Panels
06/10/2007 03:48:50 PM · #14
dual display.

rules.

I can't use a pc without it.
06/10/2007 07:29:14 PM · #15
Originally posted by kirbic:

... S-IPS panels and the ability to calibrate precisely are a must.


Kirbic,

Just curious, why do you feel that S-IPS panels are a must? I am very interested in the Dell UltraSharp 2007WFP, but I read that it is not guaranteed to come with an S-IPS panel. Apparently, Dell initially made all of the 2007WFP's with S-IPS, then started phasing in a cheaper type of panel. So when you buy an UltraSharp 2007WFP, there's no way of knowing which kind of panel you're going to get. Bizarre, right?

It's like they build the initial reputation of the monitor with a superior panel type, then once the monitor is established (with good reviews, etc.) in the marketplace as an excellent product, they cost reduce it and compromise its performance in the process. Or maybe I'm just being a paranoid conspiracy theorist :P

Anyway, I'd be curious to hear your 2 cents.

Thanks.
06/10/2007 08:03:35 PM · #16
Originally posted by idnic:

First and most important --- YOUR WIFE IS ALWAYS RIGHT!

' . substr('//i36.photobucket.com/albums/e30/Eddid/Gifs/z7shysterical.gif', strrpos('//i36.photobucket.com/albums/e30/Eddid/Gifs/z7shysterical.gif', '/') + 1) . '
Didn't know you were a comedienne too Cindi.

We now return you to your normally scheduled program.
06/10/2007 09:52:26 PM · #17
Originally posted by Keith Maniac:

Kirbic,

Just curious, why do you feel that S-IPS panels are a must? I am very interested in the Dell UltraSharp 2007WFP, but I read that it is not guaranteed to come with an S-IPS panel. Apparently, Dell initially made all of the 2007WFP's with S-IPS, then started phasing in a cheaper type of panel. So when you buy an UltraSharp 2007WFP, there's no way of knowing which kind of panel you're going to get. Bizarre, right?

It's like they build the initial reputation of the monitor with a superior panel type, then once the monitor is established (with good reviews, etc.) in the marketplace as an excellent product, they cost reduce it and compromise its performance in the process. Or maybe I'm just being a paranoid conspiracy theorist :P

Anyway, I'd be curious to hear your 2 cents.

Thanks.


TN panels are not even worth considering, while PVA are actually decent panels. The real problem with PVA panels is that gamma shifts rather dramatically with viewing angle. That, IMO, makes them much less desirable for photo work. It's hard enough to ensure that you are looking directly at the monitor, but when you need to share the view with someone else, it becomes impossible.
In the end, the best LCD monitors that I've personally seen and worked with use S-IPS panels. Gamers may beg to differ, but for photo work, it's the way to go.
06/10/2007 10:10:19 PM · #18
Go for the 24". You can never have too much screen real estate. I'm running 3 Trinitron CRT monitors, one 24" 16:9 at 1920x1200 and 2 21" 4:3's at 1600x1200 and find it just about right. After using this setup even going back to a dual display would be painful.
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06/10/2007 10:14:44 PM · #19
I'm using the Mac 23" Display and really wish I had gotten the 30". Go big!
06/10/2007 10:23:21 PM · #20
Originally posted by kirbic:


TN panels are not even worth considering, while PVA are actually decent panels. The real problem with PVA panels is that gamma shifts rather dramatically with viewing angle. That, IMO, makes them much less desirable for photo work. It's hard enough to ensure that you are looking directly at the monitor, but when you need to share the view with someone else, it becomes impossible.
In the end, the best LCD monitors that I've personally seen and worked with use S-IPS panels. Gamers may beg to differ, but for photo work, it's the way to go.


Interesting. Thanks, Kirbic.
06/11/2007 12:11:56 AM · #21
For your money, the best screen acreage is to get a multi-monitor system. Large screens cost a lot, but smaller screens cost much less dollars per unit area, even if you have to buy new graphics cards to support them. Plus you don't throw away the screens you already have - you just keep adding.

06/11/2007 12:40:46 PM · #22
How funny, the single most important question hasn't been asked yet,

how far away do you sit from your screen?
06/11/2007 01:57:23 PM · #23
I feel that I have inadvertently slipped in to a computer geeks anonymous meeting....! So once I have replaced my Canon350d with a shiny new 5d (in my dreams) and my not quite bottom of the range Acer Aspire laptop with a gleaming white Mac PC (I may have got my terminology wrong here) should I be looking at a new monitor or a new lens?

Yours,
Confused of York.
06/11/2007 02:04:17 PM · #24
Wow that is awesome, think if you turned them into flat screens and hung them on the wall how much more desk space you would have.

I have a 19" Samsung flat LCD. Sometimes I'll hook it up to my laptop and have dual screens with my 14" laptop screen.

Originally posted by EricMGB1974:

Go for the 24". You can never have too much screen real estate. I'm running 3 Trinitron CRT monitors, one 24" 16:9 at 1920x1200 and 2 21" 4:3's at 1600x1200 and find it just about right. After using this setup even going back to a dual display would be painful.
' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/46330/thumb/464365.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/46330/thumb/464365.jpg', '/') + 1) . '
06/11/2007 02:06:38 PM · #25
1/2 - 1 Meter. When I look at the photos while voting I usually vary this distance back and forth. A bad photo looks pretty good from 1 meter away but then when you get closer the faults will start to reveal themselves.

Originally posted by k4rp:

How funny, the single most important question hasn't been asked yet,

how far away do you sit from your screen?


Message edited by author 2007-06-11 14:07:13.
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