DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> Dealing with fringing
Pages:  
Showing posts 1 - 8 of 8, (reverse)
AuthorThread
11/05/2007 10:26:06 PM · #1
I've never been impressed with the fringing removal tools available in Adobe RAW. I tend to have to deal with fringing as I like to shoot high contrast landscapes (ie dark rocks, light water) at wide angles. Up until now I've painstakingly cloned the fringing out, but I just came across another method (which may be obvious to others). Select the fringe with your favorite method (color range, inverse selection, magic wand, etc) and use the sponge tool to desaturate. The results look natural and this is much easier than cloning.

Anybody else wanna share their methods? I'm always looking for good ideas.
11/05/2007 10:50:42 PM · #2
Hi Jason,

I have another trick that is pretty quick. First duplicate the layer and apply gaussian blur filter (try different setting as different size might have different effect) then set the blending mode to color. If you apply this conservatively, this trick will desaturate almost all the color fringing. I hope it helps.
11/05/2007 11:32:53 PM · #3
Originally posted by Meoux:

Hi Jason,

I have another trick that is pretty quick. First duplicate the layer and apply gaussian blur filter (try different setting as different size might have different effect) then set the blending mode to color. If you apply this conservatively, this trick will desaturate almost all the color fringing. I hope it helps.


Whoa, that's pretty sweet. Thanks for the tip!
11/05/2007 11:47:49 PM · #4
Originally posted by DrAchoo:

Originally posted by Meoux:

Hi Jason,

I have another trick that is pretty quick. First duplicate the layer and apply gaussian blur filter (try different setting as different size might have different effect) then set the blending mode to color. If you apply this conservatively, this trick will desaturate almost all the color fringing. I hope it helps.


Whoa, that's pretty sweet. Thanks for the tip!


You mean you didn't KNOW this? Jejeje™

R.
11/05/2007 11:59:29 PM · #5
Blending modes are the undiscovered country for me. I know multiply and that's about it... ;)
11/06/2007 12:08:13 AM · #6
Im kinda surprised that you have problems w/fringing with the 24-105, I dont alot about that lens so I dont know (its your widest listed)-- With that said what happened to your lens line-up? Did you sell some of em (the tammy?)

EDIT-- its been a long day soory-- You never had the Tamron 28-75, I was confusing you with scalvert-- honest mistake-- :)

Message edited by author 2007-11-06 00:11:43.
11/06/2007 12:21:36 AM · #7
I think fringing is a bit of an issue on the 24-105. probably has to do with the 4x range. It isn't crazy bad, but I hate any. It also tends to be at the edges and like I said, I tend to shoot high contrast stuff.

The 17-40 had the same issues, so I think it may be a product of wide angle.
11/06/2007 12:41:30 AM · #8
I deal with fringing when I use my wide angle lens as well. Most often happen when I stack High-Tech ND and warming filter on it. I use Singh Ray these days and I notice better result since.
Pages:  
Current Server Time: 08/04/2021 04:16:51 PM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2021 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 08/04/2021 04:16:51 PM EDT.