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DPChallenge Forums >> How'd They Do That? >> Triumph!
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12/03/2007 09:38:49 PM · #1
Post your comments, questions, and reviews for...

How'd They Do That
'Triumph!' by annpatt

View this tutorial here.
12/03/2007 09:46:44 PM · #2
Fantastic! Excellent work!
12/03/2007 09:51:53 PM · #3
great explanation, I wondered how that worked. Now I need more flashes. :)
12/04/2007 10:43:22 AM · #4
Originally posted by jdannels:

great explanation, I wondered how that worked. Now I need more flashes. :)


No kidding. I did the shot with 3, have since bought a 4th, and I'm looking on craigslist for more.
12/04/2007 11:03:24 AM · #5
Thank you for all the details and the very clear explanation.
Excellent !!!
12/04/2007 11:08:18 AM · #6
One of the best tutorials I've read. Good work.
12/04/2007 11:13:05 AM · #7
awesome tutorial ... thanks for sharing!
12/05/2007 01:16:25 AM · #8
Thanks for sharing! I know personally how much work these are to write. :)
12/05/2007 01:36:27 AM · #9
Great tut!
12/05/2007 01:10:09 PM · #10
Thanks, everyone. I'm glad people got something from the tutorial. I had a lot of fun writing it.
12/05/2007 01:24:10 PM · #11
Very good tutorial. I enjoyed reading it.
12/05/2007 01:27:41 PM · #12
Great job on the tutorial, Ann. You are not only an excellent photographer but also a natural writer. Thanks for taking the time to share.
12/05/2007 03:16:00 PM · #13
Beautiful, lucid explanation. Great tutorial!

R.
12/05/2007 03:28:59 PM · #14
Thanks for taking the time to share.
12/05/2007 04:13:45 PM · #15
What a great tutorial. I knew it took alot to get a picture like that, now I know it also takes alot of patience. Thanks for a great job.
12/05/2007 04:45:49 PM · #16
Awesome! Thanks for that tutorial Ann, though we don't have hummingbirds here in Australia, the information you have provided might be useful in capturing some Australian birds in the same fashion.
02/27/2008 09:53:11 AM · #17
Thanks for posting your setup for this!
One clarification and something you may not know...
You said "1/500 is the max sync speed on my D70, so I started there".
The D70 actually "syncs" way faster than that as long as you are not using iTTL flash.
The key is to just use the hotshoe as a trigger as you have done w/ those el Cheapo radio triggers (which I also have and is a great value btw).
I've easily gotten results at 1/2000 and if you dial down you flash far enough you can even 'sync' at 1/8000.

Important to remember that this is unique (afaik) to the D70 which switches to an electronic shutter for speeds past 1/250.

02/27/2008 12:30:58 PM · #18
Originally posted by rswank:

Thanks for posting your setup for this!
One clarification and something you may not know...
You said "1/500 is the max sync speed on my D70, so I started there".
The D70 actually "syncs" way faster than that as long as you are not using iTTL flash.
The key is to just use the hotshoe as a trigger as you have done w/ those el Cheapo radio triggers (which I also have and is a great value btw).
I've easily gotten results at 1/2000 and if you dial down you flash far enough you can even 'sync' at 1/8000.

Important to remember that this is unique (afaik) to the D70 which switches to an electronic shutter for speeds past 1/250.


The fast sync only works when the flashes are wired. I did a test with my ebay triggers and the fastest sync I could get was 1/500. I should have made that more clear.

For reference, on my D300, the fastest sync I get with the ebay triggers is 1/180, which is slower than the 1/320 using iTTL or wired.
02/27/2008 02:42:02 PM · #19
Originally posted by Ann:

Originally posted by rswank:

Thanks for posting your setup for this!
One clarification and something you may not know...
You said "1/500 is the max sync speed on my D70, so I started there".
The D70 actually "syncs" way faster than that as long as you are not using iTTL flash.
The key is to just use the hotshoe as a trigger as you have done w/ those el Cheapo radio triggers (which I also have and is a great value btw).
I've easily gotten results at 1/2000 and if you dial down you flash far enough you can even 'sync' at 1/8000.

Important to remember that this is unique (afaik) to the D70 which switches to an electronic shutter for speeds past 1/250.


The fast sync only works when the flashes are wired. I did a test with my ebay triggers and the fastest sync I could get was 1/500. I should have made that more clear.

For reference, on my D300, the fastest sync I get with the ebay triggers is 1/180, which is slower than the 1/320 using iTTL or wired.


Weird, I've had no problems with the eBay trigger with shutter speeds over 1/500.
Maybe a difference with the D70 and D70s (although I would doubt it)?
Have you the upgraded firmware?
02/27/2008 03:10:49 PM · #20
Originally posted by rswank:


Weird, I've had no problems with the eBay trigger with shutter speeds over 1/500.
Maybe a difference with the D70 and D70s (although I would doubt it)?
Have you the upgraded firmware?


Yeah, the firmware's updated. I think there are some sync differences between the D70 and D70s, and the D70s syncs faster. 1/500 is as fast as I've ever needed, so I've never pursued the matter.
06/09/2008 11:01:29 PM · #21
excellent. Thank you.
07/01/2008 09:30:56 PM · #22
Hi everyone, we are new here..and big hummingbird photo fans. Great "how-to" on backyard lighting, Ann. I had noticed you were trying to take the shots of the bird in the shade of a tree and I see why lights were then needed. We have several feeders in our yard and if you can place one in direct daylight, no lights are needed or a reflector placed in the appropriate spot can help diffuse shadow lines though for harsh sunlight.

My wife has hundreds of shots similar to yours, all taken with natural light in our back yard with a Nikon D40X and either Nikkor 55-200 or 70-300 lenses. We see the trick to hummingbird shots is patience, and more patience... and then be quick on the trigger for your remote (if you choose to use a tripod), or pre-focus for the distance to your feeder and stand quietly waiting for the bird to arrive and quickly but smoothly point the camera and shoot in multi-frame mode for bursts of consecutive shots since they do not stay in one place for long. I hopes this also helps other fans of hummingbird photos to get better captures of these little beauties.

I'm not sure if this is allowed here, and please forgive us if it not, but FOR THIS EXAMPLE, and since we do not have any images uploaded on here yet, you can view our hummingbird images at //www.redbubble.com/people/kardancreations ...then please click on "view all art", our hummingbird shots are mixed in with other images there.
11/21/2008 09:31:09 PM · #23
thanks...quite alot of effort for the shot and for the tutorial...much appreciated (shot and tutorial)
01/26/2009 07:11:11 PM · #24
Thank you for the info, it is very helpful. I shoot a lot of hummingblur shots in the summer, can't wait to try this out.


03/21/2009 10:58:20 PM · #25
THANKS SO MUCH FOR THE ARTICLE I AM GOING TO TRY TO DO THAT I ALSO SHOOT ALOT OF NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY I WAS WONDERING WHAT KIND OF SLR DID YOU SHOOT WITH AND HOW DID YOU SHOOT THAT WITH CAMERA AT THAT OF FAST SHUTTER SPEED GREAT SHOOT
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