DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> General Discussion >> NY institute of Photography
Pages:  
Showing posts 1 - 19 of 19, (reverse)
AuthorThread
12/18/2007 09:13:50 PM · #1
I have been considering enrolling in the online version of the New York Institute of Photography. I was wondering if any DPCers have taken this class and what they thought of it. In the brochure it sounds really promising. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Kevin
12/18/2007 09:29:33 PM · #2
There's been a few people that have, just run a search.

This one
And here
Don't forget this one
Or this one

There's tons just go look.
12/18/2007 09:44:06 PM · #3
Thanks!!!!!!!!!!
12/18/2007 10:58:27 PM · #4
I love NY institute of photography, I have learned so much so far. I think it is def. worth the money, and they just re did all there lessons for more up to date information in the digital world. I think you would like it.
12/19/2007 12:11:00 AM · #5
Save your money and study this site and other sites! It's boring and outdated material. Follow the pros online and you'll learn a lot of up-to-date info. The online feedback is great too; you get many points of view rather than just one.
12/19/2007 12:14:18 AM · #6
Originally posted by ButterflySis:

Save your money and study this site and other sites! It's boring and outdated material. Follow the pros online and you'll learn a lot of up-to-date info. The online feedback is great too; you get many points of view rather than just one.


It really doesn't matter how good this site is, how much you could learn vs. still learn a lot by the book and get a CERTIFICATION. Unfortunately clients don't care how many ribbons you have, they care about the certifications you have. So, go for it, get your certification and put it on your resume as an official achievement ;)
12/19/2007 09:05:51 AM · #7
Originally posted by ButterflySis:

Save your money and study this site and other sites! It's boring and outdated material. Follow the pros online and you'll learn a lot of up-to-date info. The online feedback is great too; you get many points of view rather than just one.


Actually it's not outdated anymore, they just re programmed the entire classes. I am attending right now. It's all updated to the digital world. I think it is worth the money. Go look in my portfolio and look how much I have improved since taking the classes at NYIP.
12/19/2007 09:16:04 AM · #8
My sister is finishing her last lesson and I am just starting my first. I had to do it... she got so much better than me because of it.
12/19/2007 09:43:30 AM · #9
Originally posted by FocusPoint:

It really doesn't matter how good this site is, how much you could learn vs. still learn a lot by the book and get a CERTIFICATION. Unfortunately clients don't care how many ribbons you have, they care about the certifications you have. So, go for it, get your certification and put it on your resume as an official achievement ;)


Not sure that's true. In the IT world there is a similar deal and while in some areas it helps for the most part it's irrelevant and I think Photg is less of a profession the IT. I see photg like Chase Jarvis seem to do okay :-)

Message edited by author 2007-12-19 09:44:02.
12/19/2007 10:03:20 AM · #10
Originally posted by robs:

Originally posted by FocusPoint:

It really doesn't matter how good this site is, how much you could learn vs. still learn a lot by the book and get a CERTIFICATION. Unfortunately clients don't care how many ribbons you have, they care about the certifications you have. So, go for it, get your certification and put it on your resume as an official achievement ;)


Not sure that's true. In the IT world there is a similar deal and while in some areas it helps for the most part it's irrelevant and I think Photg is less of a profession the IT. I see photg like Chase Jarvis seem to do okay :-)


Don't get me wrong, wining ribbons are huge deal... They are still in my resume, and will be part of it. Think about a bit older generation... I don't want to say older generation, maybe other people that look more official papers when it comes to resume stuff. I sure will be putting my NYI certification up front first in my resume, and to my wall (yeap, like doctors). They are more official then ribbons.

That's why I asked many times to SC's and Langdon to have a page that we could print those ribbons with a little bit more official look, so we could hang them somewhere to show our clients.

Anyway, I believe taking classes are much better than hands on training. Not because you learn more, but because of the paper they give at the end ;)
12/19/2007 01:01:01 PM · #11
I'm planning on attending in January when I get my financial aid for school. I'm pretty excited about it!
12/19/2007 01:54:13 PM · #12
Originally posted by FocusPoint:

I sure will be putting my NYI certification up front first in my resume, and to my wall (yeap, like doctors).

That's why I asked many times to SC's and Langdon to have a page that we could print those ribbons with a little bit more official look, so we could hang them somewhere to show our clients.

Anyway, I believe taking classes are much better than hands on training. Not because you learn more, but because of the paper they give at the end ;)


- I would not be able to find my certs from Uni if my life depended on it... they are around somewhere :-)

- I think that's actually a decent idea. Not relevant in my case :-) but I can see the purpose for marketing.

- I think we just disagree on this one... I have always treated the bits of paper as something to get where I wanted to be discarded once you are there. If a bit of paper helps in getting in that door then great but I believe most photg is about the ability to get the image the client wants. Some people work better in one environ or the other, so pick the one that help you learn the best for you.
12/19/2007 07:07:41 PM · #13
With respect, I don't think certifications and diplomas are going to "make or break" the deal. You need to be really good whether or not you have the paper. I think that's true for many jobs these days. There are many self-taught professionals out there and there are also many people with their 'papers' that are educated idiots. The paper doesn't equate to a highly skilled worker. That's a whole other topic though.

Obviously it's up to each person to decide what's best for them. If you think you'd benefit from the program, then join. Not everyone is good at learning on their own...but if I had to do it over again, I would have bought another lens with the $1,000+ :)
12/19/2007 07:38:39 PM · #14
Obviously it's up to each person to decide what's best for them. If you think you'd benefit from the program, then join. Not everyone is good at learning on their own...but if I had to do it over again, I would have bought another lens with the $1,000+ :) [/quote]

OK Original poster here:
I really value the opinions of the people in this thread, but I am curious about 3 things.

First: Do you think the $1,000 lens would have made you a better photographer?

Second: Some are saying the lessons are old. I am curious if they even mention digital aspects such as digital noise, and other digital aspects or are the lessons still in the film mind set of grain, and developing of film.

Third: How detailed are the business courses that they have, and are they enough to really get you started in opening a studio. Is there talk about small business loans and starting LLC's.

I am going to call the school on Monday or Friday, however I am looking for as much information as I can compile so I can ask informed questions and make sure I am getting accurate answers.

Thanks.
Kevin

Message edited by author 2007-12-19 19:39:12.
12/19/2007 07:55:12 PM · #15
Originally posted by iamkmaniam:

First: Do you think the $1,000 lens would have made you a better photographer?


Of course not. Equipment doesn't make a better photographer, but good equipment will improve the images you take...sharpness, color, etc.

Maybe the new texts and CD's are better. I have the old books, cassette tapes, and VHS.

Good luck with whatever you decide.
12/19/2007 08:48:39 PM · #16
I did enroll in the NYI many years ago. I still have all the materials, which I refer to frequently, especially regarding lighting. The basics will not change whether you are going digital or staying with film. As to using it on the resume, I would try to check with others who have completed the program. There is a certain hierarchy regarding photography (yeh, we have one here at dp as well) and I am not sure what clients think about it. I suppose if they are not privy to the schools and programs, they may not care. Some who are in the know regarding the institute might laugh a little, but it might get you in the door to show your portfolio. It all boils down to how skilled you are in the area you want to work in, regardless of where you learned it.
As you can see by my scores, obviously most of what was taught did not stick. Or maybe it is because it was so long ago I took it. I have always done my own thing, but I am not interested in becoming a real professional anyway. For me personally I think I would rather take a formal class with real people and teachers I report to every week, but that is because I am a people person and prefer the contact. I am considering enrolling in my local college to take a few courses to see if I can somehow get on track with todays styles, but I would not ever go through the NYI again. For some reason learning from a tape just didn't do it for me.
As to what it did for me, I was able to procure a photojournalism job for a brief time because of it. I would have stayed with it if my daughter wasn't so young at the time, but my decision to put down my camera for my family was the best one I could have made. So, because I took off about 15 years from photography, except for family and vacation shots, I am a bit slow on the uptake now as I try to get back into it. Perhaps one day I will break into the top 3 at dp, but I won't hold my breath over it.

Message edited by author 2007-12-19 20:54:42.
12/19/2007 09:14:51 PM · #17
Originally posted by JunieMoon:

...As you can see by my scores, obviously most of what was taught did not stick. Or maybe it is because it was so long ago I took it...


Hey, you are doing good for a 6 years old ;)
12/19/2007 09:44:42 PM · #18
Originally posted by FocusPoint:

Originally posted by JunieMoon:

...As you can see by my scores, obviously most of what was taught did not stick. Or maybe it is because it was so long ago I took it...


Hey, you are doing good for a 6 years old ;)


lol. The figures don't add up, though. But what can I say. Your as old as you feel, or in my case, as old as your photo experience is. I guess I can pass for an okay 6 year old when it comes to taking photos. They'll take anybody at the NYI. Just kidding, iamkmaniam
12/19/2007 11:42:48 PM · #19
Originally posted by JunieMoon:

...As you can see by my scores, obviously most of what was taught did not stick. Or maybe it is because it was so long ago I took it...


Pfft! You have beautiful photography and great scores! I think that's a good advertisement for NYI. One of the appealing things that made me decide to go with them was the equipment bonus if you pay in full and that they give you 3 years to complete the program. And the college wouldn't let me into their program.
Pages:  
Current Server Time: 11/24/2020 04:43:31 PM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2020 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 11/24/2020 04:43:31 PM EST.