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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> nikon "D" vs. "G" lenses
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Showing posts 1 - 13 of 13, (reverse)
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02/20/2004 04:13:14 AM · #1
what are the major differences? why is the 70mm to 300mm "G" $99.oo, and the same lens in "D" $269.oo? both are f4-5.6 and fit 62mm filters. i know that the aperature on the "G" is controlled in the camera only, but the "D" works the same way when set to minimum aperature.
I'd also like some input on the 24mm-120mm nikor VR "G". is it really worth the $569.oo? does the anti vibration gizzy really do its job?

thanks in advance. I'm used to the oldschool nikons and am still learning these new fangled AF deals.
02/20/2004 04:56:30 AM · #2
The 70-300G is just a cheaper version of the 70-300D, it has a plastic mount and no ED glass..

I have tried the 24-120G and really liked it, VR works great.
02/20/2004 11:55:28 AM · #3
but they still function the same on the d100?
02/20/2004 12:02:31 PM · #4
yes, both of these lenses are fully functional with the D100.

I recommend the 70-300D, I have one myself and love it, great lens for just $269.
02/20/2004 12:27:25 PM · #5
Both lenses are rather similar, but there are slight differences that you really should consider.

The superior lens in the D-series lens. The D-series has a similar lens construction made up of 13 elements in 9 groups, but one of these lens elements utilizes the high-grade Nikkor ED glass. The ED glass offers you higher resolution and higher contrast, even at maximum apertures.

As a result, you will notice that the D-series lens is a bit heavier - 18.2 ounces versus the G-series at just 16.5 ounces.

As they say, "you get what you pay for".

If you can afford the D-series, then this is the way to proceed, otherwise, enjoy the G-series as a good alternative. Either way, the 70-300mm x4.3 zoom range, the 1:4 macro ratio, and the minimum focus of about 5 feet should make for a fun lens to add to any photographic kit.

Compatibility with your Nikon body should not be a concern with either lens version. They will both work with the D100 just fine. However, the D-series will function perfectly on older 35mm film bodies that require the aperture ring for exposure control. This is a nice feature if you have older Nikon camera bodies or enjoy the DOF control that this method of manual intervention offers you.

Be sure to share with us what you decide to do.

Message edited by author 2004-02-20 12:33:23.
02/20/2004 10:08:13 PM · #6
now the 24-120 vr is a "G" lens, but i see that it is not available in a "D". is it worth the $569.oo?
02/20/2004 10:21:13 PM · #7
I've got the 70-300mm d (ED) It's worth buying. Unless you want to spend some more cash for the 80-400mm.
02/20/2004 10:39:46 PM · #8
Originally posted by Armadillo:

now the 24-120 vr is a "G" lens, but i see that it is not available in a "D". is it worth the $569.oo?


Needless to say, worth is determined based upon a subjective evaluation that will be different for each Nikon user. I always break it down as "gotta have it", "need it", "want it", and "oh, it's just a Canon". [LOL]

Seriously, this is a interesting lens. First and foremost is the VR factor. As you may already know, VR means Vibration Reduction. So, it will permit a user to capture an image in lower than normal light conditions when hand-holding a camera or it will permit either a greater shutter speed or a smaller aperture with a tripod and / or a flash.

Personally, I own the 80 mm to 400 mm VR and simply love it. It is a terrific lens because of the VR feature and the wonderful zoom range. So, this VR feature is highly prized.

When this 24-120 was announced, I failed to understand why I would want the VR feature for its image stabilization benefits. But the extra two to three F-stops depending upon the focal length would be extremely beneficial in order to maintain DOF in low light circumstances.

I also love the AF-S feature on my 17-35mm f/2.8D ED-IF AF-S Zoom, 28-70mm f/2.8 ED-IF AF-S Zoom, and 80-200mm f/2.8D ED-IF AF-S Zoom. The silent wave motors offer you blinding speed and are amazingly quiet. These features are most noticeable on lenses when they are without the AF-S capability. Luckily, the 24-120 is also a AF-S series lens.

For my D100, I bought the 28-200mm f/3.5-5.6D IF AF Zoom. I am a telephoto nut and felt that this extra zoom range better fit my utility lens needs. I wish that this lens was available in a VR, maybe someday?

Message edited by author 2004-02-21 05:52:49.
02/20/2004 11:05:07 PM · #9
Thanks for the info.
02/20/2004 11:40:35 PM · #10
Originally posted by Morgan:

[quote=Armadillo]
I also love the AF-S feature on my 17-35mm f/2.8D ED-IF AF-S Zoom,


Love the lense, but almost never use it.
02/21/2004 05:54:20 AM · #11
Originally posted by DJLuba:

Originally posted by Morgan:

[quote=Armadillo]
I also love the AF-S feature on my 17-35mm f/2.8D ED-IF AF-S Zoom,


Love the lense, but almost never use it.


Is there a reason that you do not use this lens?
02/23/2004 02:04:48 PM · #12
Originally posted by Morgan:

Originally posted by DJLuba:

Originally posted by Morgan:

[quote=Armadillo]
I also love the AF-S feature on my 17-35mm f/2.8D ED-IF AF-S Zoom,


Love the lense, but almost never use it.


Is there a reason that you do not use this lens?


Morgan,
This probably boils down to shooting style. I feel much for comfortable with my 50mm 1.4, and the f/1.4 glass is difficult to part with once you start shooting.
02/24/2004 11:03:35 AM · #13
Originally posted by DJLuba:

Originally posted by Morgan:

Originally posted by DJLuba:

Originally posted by Morgan:

[quote=Armadillo]
I also love the AF-S feature on my 17-35mm f/2.8D ED-IF AF-S Zoom,


Love the lense, but almost never use it.


Is there a reason that you do not use this lens?


Morgan,
This probably boils down to shooting style. I feel much for comfortable with my 50mm 1.4, and the f/1.4 glass is difficult to part with once you start shooting.


David, I agree somewhat with your point, as I also use the 28mm f1.4 and the 85mm f1.4 for low light work. I do not own a prime lens at 50mm other than zooms. But, with Photoshop and all of its capabilities, I find that it is easy to fix exposure issues that at one time would have been better served with a very fast lens. DOF is another factor, but I find that I either go to the extremes rather then for anything in the middle. Again, Photoshop can play a role in DOF too, but it is not my first choice. Michael
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