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DPChallenge Forums >> General Discussion >> Stephen Kings: The Mist - Movie
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04/28/2008 03:15:05 PM · #1
OK, I loved the short story of The Mist and just managed to see the film. All I can say is that Frank Darabont should be the ONLY director/screenplay writer to work on Stephen King material for the big screen. He hit this one out of the park, it is almost exactly the same as the images I saw in my head whilst reading the novella. But the ending is so damn brutal! I didn't see that coming, a great change from the book... Fantastic stuff!

Lets hope if "The Dark Tower" is ever made into a film series, he is the Director to do the job.

Message edited by author 2008-04-28 15:23:11.
04/28/2008 03:24:36 PM · #2
The ending was super crazy-- I didnt think I would like this movie, the trailers made it look like some cheesy B-Movie, but it was pretty good, much better than the drawn out 8 hour King movies that air on USA and such..
04/28/2008 03:36:48 PM · #3
Uh huh, Darabonts' other King book-to-screen films are "Shawshank Redemption" and "The Green Mile"... so he is definitely tuned into Kings' vision of how things should be done.
04/28/2008 03:46:59 PM · #4
I concur. The ending for The Mist was sooooo good! I was completely surprised. I also didn't think I'd like it and then loved it. I love Thomas Jane too.
04/28/2008 03:57:33 PM · #5

Spoiler alert.

I thought "The Mist" was pretty good. Personally I disliked the ending (which went beyond the novella's ending), but I enjoyed the movie. It had a couple of scenes where people acted extremely stupidly, like when the insects were attracted to the lanterns and it took them forever to figure it out! And the religious lady was awfully tiresome. I know she was supposed to be tiresome, but still... anyway, always a pleasure to see Jeffrey DeMunn and Frances Sternhagen.

However, I thought The Green Mile was bad. Overlong, for one thing. And I hate movies that pretend to be abhoring violence and cruelty while actually relishing it.

04/28/2008 03:58:33 PM · #6
Best King movie ever, in my opinion. The theatre was dead silent during the last five minutes, even the teenagers in the row behind me.
04/28/2008 04:02:20 PM · #7
one of my friends [we're both athiest] screamed out "I hate you you fucking bitch!!" when the religious lady was making one of her speeches haha
04/28/2008 04:37:58 PM · #8
Originally posted by Louis:

Best King movie ever, in my opinion. ...........

Oh come on! ......... "The Shining" ???
04/28/2008 04:49:48 PM · #9
Originally posted by Strikeslip:

Originally posted by Louis:

Best King movie ever, in my opinion. ...........

Oh come on! ......... "The Shining" ???

Bleh... I was going to say "better than The Shining", but I thought everyone knew that Shelley Duvall's underacting while channeling "Olive Oyl" made for a sub-par theatrical experience. ;-) Sure, Jack Nicholson, but you can't save dross that doesn't even follow the book that well by throwing his emphatamine-charged performance in there. (Other than these points, I loved The Shining.)
04/28/2008 05:00:36 PM · #10
All I can say is that the acting was terrible... I didnt find any of the characters to be believable - especially the psychotic religious freak lady.
04/28/2008 05:42:15 PM · #11
I had put movies based on King's work on hold after reading and seeing "Dreamcatcher" and re-watching "IT."

Dreamcatcher is the only king book I've read, and liked it alot...except for the end. He is very descriptive, paints some great mental pictures, builds up his characters...then the end is anticlimactic and downright stupid. In Dreamcatcher the movie, the childhood friend turns into an alien to kill the other alien. And the super scary psychotic killer clown from IT turns out to be some giant space spider...come on. It was as if one person wrote most of the book, then handed the last few chapters off to some high alien/monster junkie to finish. "Whoa...the clown could be like a huge alien spider...yeah man..." Give me a break.

I have The Mist on my queue and might give a King movie another shot.
04/28/2008 06:21:06 PM · #12
"He didn't get out of the cockadoodie car!"

As long as were mentioning movies of Stephen King books, "Misery" shouldn't be forgotten. "The Shining" is probably the very best (Kubrick = God). And the 1980s movie of "The Dead Zone," directed by David Cronenberg, is very good. "Carrie," too. Heck, I even like both versions of "Salem's Lot".
04/29/2008 11:44:01 AM · #13
Originally posted by drewbixcube:

I had put movies based on King's work on hold after reading and seeing "Dreamcatcher" and re-watching "IT."

Dreamcatcher is the only king book I've read, and liked it alot...except for the end. He is very descriptive, paints some great mental pictures, builds up his characters...then the end is anticlimactic and downright stupid. In Dreamcatcher the movie, the childhood friend turns into an alien to kill the other alien. And the super scary psychotic killer clown from IT turns out to be some giant space spider...come on. It was as if one person wrote most of the book, then handed the last few chapters off to some high alien/monster junkie to finish. "Whoa...the clown could be like a huge alien spider...yeah man..." Give me a break.

I have The Mist on my queue and might give a King movie another shot.


Thats the problem most film makers have with Kings works, his storytelling is so descriptive, and he writes stuff that cannot be visualisd outside of ones mind ,for example, The Deadlights in "IT", no amount of CGI could put on the screen that vast amount of nothingness which King manages to stimulate ones imagination to `visualise`. Remember, in the book "IT", the spider at the end is only the shape that the brain could interpret from what it was really seeing. Same goes for the `Turtle`.

Another great short story worth reading is "The Jaunt", the idea of teleportation has been written about countless times, but the idea that if one teleports whilst awake their body may take seconds, but the conciousness may take an almost infinite time to `catch up`, to be alone with ones thoughts for such a unthinkable amount of time is actually quite horrific.. great story.
04/29/2008 11:48:12 AM · #14
Years ago, I read 10 Kings work all in a row. ((Edited to add that Patrica Cornwell is like that too)

After about the 3rd one, they are all the same. Pretty much the same story over and over again.

Misery was good, The one with the handcuffed girl was good.

Message edited by author 2008-04-29 11:48:43.
04/29/2008 11:48:29 AM · #15
Originally posted by Simms:

Another great short story worth reading is "The Jaunt", the idea of teleportation has been written about countless times, but the idea that if one teleports whilst awake their body may take seconds, but the conciousness may take an almost infinite time to `catch up`, to be alone with ones thoughts for such a unthinkable amount of time is actually quite horrific.. great story.

Yeah, that story was great... if you haven't already read it, get "Everything's Eventual", his latest collection of shorts. In my view it dispels the notion that he's nothing but a popular novelist. These stories represent superb writing in my opinion. (Never thought I'd take that view btw, and I all but stopped reading King in the eighties because even then I was tired of it all.)

Message edited by author 2008-04-29 11:49:05.
04/29/2008 12:18:39 PM · #16
Reading The Shining was extra fun for me. I read it through the night while working at an old hotel as night auditor/security. I was the only soul in the creeky old place and it was pretty darn spooky! Bala Bay Inn, in case you know it, in Bala, Ontario. It was once called The Swastika Hotel, until WWII made that name unpopular. I think I could still see some remnants of the large swastika painted on the outside.
:-O
04/29/2008 12:28:10 PM · #17
Originally posted by Simms:

Thats the problem most film makers have with Kings works, his storytelling is so descriptive, and he writes stuff that cannot be visualisd outside of ones mind ,for example, The Deadlights in "IT", no amount of CGI could put on the screen that vast amount of nothingness which King manages to stimulate ones imagination to `visualise`. Remember, in the book "IT", the spider at the end is only the shape that the brain could interpret from what it was really seeing. Same goes for the `Turtle`.

Another great short story worth reading is "The Jaunt", the idea of teleportation has been written about countless times, but the idea that if one teleports whilst awake their body may take seconds, but the conciousness may take an almost infinite time to `catch up`, to be alone with ones thoughts for such a unthinkable amount of time is actually quite horrific.. great story.

Maybe my problem is that I have seen adaptations of his work on television and in the theater, and that has left a bad taste in my mouth. It has been several years since I read "Dreamcatcher", and thinking back on it I think I enjoyed the entire book...the movie is another story. I guess I should read more of his work. But if you all say The Mist is worth seeing, then I will check it out.
-drew
04/29/2008 12:29:31 PM · #18
I read King religiously in high school. Didn't much get into The Dark Tower series, but read most of his others, often times more than once. Haven't read any of his stuff in 10 or so years, but a short story stands out in my head called Survivor Type. It is in the same collection as The Mist.

Chicken Fingers... yum, yum.

Loved the movie!! I may have to go to the book store and see what I've missed out on in the past 10 years. Has he written anything good lately?
04/29/2008 12:39:10 PM · #19
"Lady fingers" is the line in that story. :-) You might like "Cell", which has all the creep and gore of his early stuff, but it's not so dense. The ending is lovely.
04/29/2008 01:10:26 PM · #20
Originally posted by Louis:

"Lady fingers" is the line in that story. :-) You might like "Cell", which has all the creep and gore of his early stuff, but it's not so dense. The ending is lovely.


oh yeah, "Lady fingers"... I guess I'm just really hungry. lol.

Actually, I did like 'Cell' and forgot all about it. I had bought it on tape for my drive to Utah.
04/29/2008 02:35:01 PM · #21
Slippy, your story reminds me of when I read King's The Stand (I mean the original, bloated The Stand, not the newer, unimproved, bloatier The Stand. Anyway, I was alone in my quiet apartment with a bad flu and I didn't go outside or see anyone for a day or two. When the phone rang at night my first reaction was "Someone is alive!" 8-)

Message edited by author 2008-04-29 14:35:27.
04/29/2008 03:16:47 PM · #22
Originally posted by Strikeslip:

Reading The Shining was extra fun for me. I read it through the night while working at an old hotel as night auditor/security. I was the only soul in the creeky old place and it was pretty darn spooky! Bala Bay Inn, in case you know it, in Bala, Ontario. It was once called The Swastika Hotel, until WWII made that name unpopular. I think I could still see some remnants of the large swastika painted on the outside.
:-O


Agree "The Shining" is probably his most terrifying book, seconded by "IT".

I will disagree with the person who said his books are too similar.. I mean, run The Dark Tower series alongside other stories of his such as Shawshank & Green Mile and you will see that they are not similar at all.

Was hugely disappointed with "Cell", just didnt like it at all. Currently reading "Duma Key", currently about 3/4s of the way through it and enjoying it immensely.

Another thing with Kings books, is that up until the final DT book, all of his books are interconnected in someway, the whole DT universe is present in most of his work, which until you read the whole series isnt immediately apparent. I must admit that when I first read "Low men in Yellow coats" (first story in Hearts in Atlantis), I didn't quite get the whole Ted Brautigan thing, then when the breakers etc appeared in the DT and Ted made an appearence it was like "WOW".. and I had to go back and re-read the whole of Hearts and then the whole lot finally clicked into place. (Also DInky Earnshaw had a story to himself in "Everythings Eventual" which fleshed out his character a bit.)

Also, did anyone get any of the DT graphic novels? I bought the first one then got kinda sidetracked, keep meaning to pick up the other copies when I get a chance.
04/29/2008 03:26:15 PM · #23
"Duma Key"... that's the latest right? I read the sleeve in the bookstore and it sounded really good. I'll probably end up picking it up tonight.

Who's up for a DPC book club? :) boy, that would be interesting.
04/29/2008 03:51:48 PM · #24
Originally posted by cynthiann:

"Duma Key"... that's the latest right? I read the sleeve in the bookstore and it sounded really good. I'll probably end up picking it up tonight.


Yup, Duma Key is the latest, its quite an easy read and it flows really well. The blurb on the sleeve doesnt do it justice.
04/29/2008 04:16:33 PM · #25
Stephen King Challenge?
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