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DPChallenge Forums >> Business of Photography >> How do I make a basic modeling portfolio?
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05/01/2008 04:06:40 PM · #1
A co-worker has asked me if I would take pictures of her oldest daughter who is interested in doing some modeling. Is it up to me to figure out what shots she needs or should she do that research? Does anyone know what would be a reasonable price to charge? I have no idea and I would love to do this for her because she is a sweet person. I don't want to charge too much, but I don't want to do it for free either. I have a few weeks to think this over and get back to her so she can get the money together for it. What do you guys think?
05/01/2008 04:20:23 PM · #2
I guess it depends on the type of model she would be. A tall model could have a good model portfolio that incorporates fashion, glamour, swimsuit, etc. A shorter model would be good to stick to commercial, swimsuit, and glamour shots. The best way to do it would be to go to different websites and look at model portfolios. I'd say as the photographer, you would be better off deciding what pictures to take, but you should also get an idea of what type of modeling interests her. It would be pointless to shoot swimsuit shots if she never wants to do swimsuit modeling.

Here is a website where you can browse different models and photographers portfolios to see how the models portfolios are...it'd be good to look at the interests of the model compared with the photots on their site...

One Model Place

Solomodels

Model Mayhem

Of course on these sites are really people trying to make it in the busines and few who have.
05/01/2008 05:02:07 PM · #3
You need the 'output' to be in the proper format - 9x11 or some odd size is the 'standard' size in the modeling world for some reason, not 8x10 and not 8x12.
A binder type thing with clear sheet protector 'pages' in it with the prints in those is what I've seen most often. I know a photog in Detroit that does fashion for a living - I think a typical shoot for a portfolio is around $250, sometimes more. The photog knows what is needed if they know the industry. Someone trying to break in should go that route - the photog will have connections and that's what any aspiring model will need to find work! And you (well, the model) will need a professional, knowledgeable, make up artist to do their makeup for the shoot. Yeah, it costs money. Everything worthwhile does.

Some images I took at a fashion workshop - the models are working models, one of which is full time. They are a LOT different to work with than 'aspiring' models off ModelOne, etc

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/15000-19999/16648/120/666465.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/15000-19999/16648/120/666465.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/15000-19999/16648/120/666461.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/15000-19999/16648/120/666461.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/15000-19999/16648/120/666480.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/15000-19999/16648/120/666480.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

Message edited by author 2008-05-01 17:05:31.
05/01/2008 06:47:05 PM · #4
Hey thanks guys. Any help on this will be useful to me. I don't know that I want to be a fashion photographer, but I don't want to commit to something if I can't do a good job for them. I will have to spend time with my co-worker and her daughter and find out exactly what they are looking for and what type of modeling she is wanting to do. She only asked me this morning and I gave myself time to consider if I could do it at all. I'll take your suggestions and do some more research on this.

Nice images Prof_Fate. The second one is beautiful!
05/02/2008 12:35:11 AM · #5
First was shot outdoors, 70-200 2.8 with a hint of fill flash.
middle was all natural light, 50 1.2 at 2.5.
Last was one light in the studio. Some was shot with the strobe on, some with just the modeling light.
05/02/2008 07:47:32 AM · #6
Prof_Fate....you'd be surprised that alot of the models who come shoot at those workshops are from those different websites...like ModelOne (actually never been to that site).

The standard size in the modelling world for photos is actually 9x12. There is also a difference on whether you are setting up her portfolio or becoming her manager. If you are only setting up her portfolio, you can give advice, but I'd assume she has plans of finding her own work. More than likely she probably wants shots to approach an agency (as much as agencies say they just want polaroids, they'd happily look at a model portfolio and generally a model who sends in polaroids will get sent to a photographer of the agencies choice anyways).

A make up artist is probably preferred, but you can easily get away with out having one. None of the models I've shot has used an MUA...and I've actually asked that the make up remain plain (as if going out at night).
05/02/2008 02:06:55 PM · #7


I would only be taking her pictures. She will take them from there and the rest is up to her. Thank you for your advice. I had wondered about a make up artist. She is 14 or 15 years old, so I didn't figure she would need much for make up.

Message edited by author 2008-05-02 14:08:14.
05/04/2008 11:46:35 PM · #8
Good read -
//www.newmodels.com/
05/04/2008 11:48:35 PM · #9
Originally posted by Prof_Fate:

You need the 'output' to be in the proper format - 9x11 or some odd size is the 'standard' size in the modeling world for some reason, not 8x10 and not 8x12.


9x12
05/05/2008 12:00:22 AM · #10
Originally posted by albc28:

More than likely she probably wants shots to approach an agency (as much as agencies say they just want polaroids, they'd happily look at a model portfolio and generally a model who sends in polaroids will get sent to a photographer of the agencies choice anyways).


Depends on the agency. Not all agencies want only polaroids.

Originally posted by albc28:

A make up artist is probably preferred, but you can easily get away with out having one. None of the models I've shot has used an MUA...and I've actually asked that the make up remain plain (as if going out at night).


Makeup artist strongly recommended, provided everything fits together right. Night makeup is distinctly different than day makeup - I wouldn't ask for night makeup for lifestyle on the beach or for a clean beauty shot.
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