DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> Current Challenge >> glasses and lighting
Pages:  
Showing posts 1 - 15 of 15, (reverse)
AuthorThread
06/13/2002 08:34:36 PM · #1
I have a problem all the time with folks who wear glasses. My camera has the auto flash and every time it bouces the glasses and you loose the eyes. I don't want to buy an extra flash, so does anyone have an idea how to control the flash to stop this.

Thanks
06/13/2002 08:37:18 PM · #2
Originally posted by tjpierre:
I have a problem all the time with folks who wear glasses. My camera has the auto flash and every time it bouces the glasses and you loose the eyes. I don't want to buy an extra flash, so does anyone have an idea how to control the flash to stop this.

Thanks


One low-tech solution is to mask the flash with tissue paper. This diffuses the flash and may reduce your problem. I'd experiment with this and see how you make out.
06/13/2002 11:00:39 PM · #3
Originally posted by tjpierre:
I have a problem all the time with folks who wear glasses. My camera has the auto flash and every time it bouces the glasses and you loose the eyes. I don't want to buy an extra flash, so does anyone have an idea how to control the flash to stop this.

Thanks


Sorry, I don't have a "photographer's" solution to your problem - not experienced enough to have trial and error... however I did work in optics for many years and usually by a portrait studio in a mall - they would send customers in to have their lenses removed from their frames, then after the pictures were taken we would put them back in. So, my suggestion is to purchase an eyeglass repair kit - or better yet a small flat head and phillips head screwdriver (you only need to LOOSEN 2 small screws, just enough to 'pop' the lenses out)tighten the screws back up to take the pics then replace! Really is very easy and quick to do! Recommend doing in the bathroom (better lighting) and use a white or light colored bath towel to cover sink and counter (reduces bounce if you end up dropping a screw) :) You can email me if you have questions, or any local eyeglass store could help you. :) Good luck!

06/14/2002 12:11:11 AM · #4
What I would suggest is that you sand the surface of the glasses with a rough sandpaper, Like 100-200 grit. this will drastically reduce the reflections.
06/14/2002 12:44:21 AM · #5
applying a thin layer of mayonaisse could also be worth a try. easier to reverse : )

Originally posted by Zeissman:
What I would suggest is that you sand the surface of the glasses with a rough sandpaper, Like 100-200 grit. this will drastically reduce the reflections.


06/14/2002 01:19:32 AM · #6
Originally posted by Zeissman:
What I would suggest is that you sand the surface of the glasses with a rough sandpaper, Like 100-200 grit. this will drastically reduce the reflections.


But if you'd already stuck that tissue paper to them, you'd have to sand the inside of the lenses to avoid clogging up the grit.
06/14/2002 06:20:59 AM · #7
As a glasses wearer I wouldn't recomend removing lenses as if the person is like me and is blind without them your subjects will end up squinting, not the most photogenic of subjects!
06/14/2002 06:33:09 AM · #8
Perhaps if you had a second pair of glasses, you could take out the lens of them, and use it as a "demo".
06/20/2002 07:07:40 AM · #9
Another trick is to tilt the glasses down on the person's face just a little by raising the bows off the ears slightly. Hold a penlight in the same position as your flash to see if the glare is still visible. Also, make sure their chin is down low. People tend to raise their chin when having a picture taken.
06/20/2002 09:22:01 AM · #10
You could also put a thin layer of mayo on the nose to let the glasses slide down ( after sanding them and afixing tissue).
06/20/2002 11:30:07 AM · #11
if you can, bounce the flash off the ceiling or a wall. this provides an even light that is diffused over the entire subject.
06/20/2002 11:43:59 AM · #12
Originally posted by d95vette:
if you can, bounce the flash off the ceiling or a wall. this provides an even light that is diffused over the entire subject.

It helps if you cover the ceiling with sandpaper and mayo first.

-Terry
06/20/2002 12:12:32 PM · #13
Originally posted by Zeissman:
What I would suggest is that you sand the surface of the glasses with a rough sandpaper, Like 100-200 grit. this will drastically reduce the reflections.


LOL... this is some some good stuff.. LMAO
06/20/2002 01:03:31 PM · #14
One recent trick I learned is to paint eyes on the outside of the classes with a matte finish paint.
06/20/2002 01:12:53 PM · #15
Originally posted by magnetic9999:
applying a thin layer of mayonaisse could also be worth a try. easier to reverse : )



You could try that... but that won't give your photos that tangy zip you get with Miracle Whip™.

-Terry
Pages:  
Current Server Time: 10/05/2022 06:05:30 PM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2022 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 10/05/2022 06:05:30 PM EDT.