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06/16/2008 10:51:58 AM · #1
I've twice tried to get the sunset. First time I set it on manual and as it got darker I manually slowed the shutter speed. This provided me with a video that looked to jump from dark to bright to dark again. Then I tried programed mode to see if that would help, but it would simply make sure every exposure was nice and bright, even as it got darker.

Any help on settings for a sunset?
06/16/2008 11:16:21 AM · #2
Setting the camera to match the exposure for the first shot and leaving it alone would probably give you the best results.
06/16/2008 11:19:49 AM · #3
I would suggest shooting RAW so that you can adjust the exposures more gradually in post processing.
06/16/2008 12:16:53 PM · #4
Make every effort to predict the proper manual exposure and then leave the settings alone during the sequence.

I generally meter off of the sky with the sun out of frame. Then I bracket my exposures by one stop, so the camera takes three shots each time it is triggered by the remote. The result is three complete image sequences with different exposures. Then I either choose the best one and render it out, or I render all three and blend them in video editing software. I generally shoot medium jpeg to conserve card space since I need to fit three times as many images as I will ultimately use, and all I need is 1920x1080 for full HD video. For referance, my last sunset TL was shot at ISO 100, f/11, 1/320.
06/16/2008 01:41:21 PM · #5
Originally posted by idnic:

I would suggest shooting RAW so that you can adjust the exposures more gradually in post processing.


Handling 1000+ files in PP would be a bit much for a 30 second time-lapse video.
06/16/2008 01:44:53 PM · #6
Originally posted by heavyj:

Originally posted by idnic:

I would suggest shooting RAW so that you can adjust the exposures more gradually in post processing.


Handling 1000+ files in PP would be a bit much for a 30 second time-lapse video.


Ha! I do it nearly every weekend. Lightroom is your friend. :D
06/16/2008 02:35:44 PM · #7
Originally posted by cpanaioti:

Setting the camera to match the exposure for the first shot and leaving it alone would probably give you the best results.

Yeah, leaving it alone makes for the most natural transition but if you do discover a way to be creative and have it look good then by all means do share.
Here's my most recent time lapse
06/17/2008 01:20:46 AM · #8
Here's the one that I wasn't happy with

BAD VIDEO


06/17/2008 01:32:57 AM · #9
IMHO, the best part of a lot of sunsets is in the first 20 minutes or so after the sun has actually touched the horizon. I usually shoot one or two at A Priority , metering on the clouds a little away from the brightest point in the sky. Best results are usually about -2/3 to - 1 stop for me. I also use the higher saturation settings for W B, which is cloudy day on the Fuji S3. For time lapse, I would establish a good starting point, and set manual EV for the rest of the event. I only shoot jpg, as raw files with the S3 are about 34meg each, and I don't have the hard drive capacity for that much data.
Sunsets are fun, but unpredictable for the most part. We get a lot of excellent ones here in SW Florida.
06/17/2008 01:40:34 AM · #10
If you're looking for a fade to black to make it look like night you need to set it to Manual mode, expose for the first picture, and the rest will fade off from there.

I hate to contradict what people say, but don't take it in RAW! JPG small low quality is more than you'll ever need. Setting it to the "low" quality (vs. fine) will help remove the flicker due to anit-aliasing
06/17/2008 04:45:32 AM · #11
Originally posted by Tom:

If you're looking for a fade to black to make it look like night you need to set it to Manual mode, expose for the first picture, and the rest will fade off from there.

I hate to contradict what people say, but don't take it in RAW! JPG small low quality is more than you'll ever need. Setting it to the "low" quality (vs. fine) will help remove the flicker due to anit-aliasing


I would not use RAW either. jpeg norm is fine.
06/17/2008 06:18:12 AM · #12
Manual everything! Heres one of my efforts //www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAQKm3RZFNg
06/17/2008 12:25:31 PM · #13
Originally posted by heavyj:

Here's the one that I wasn't happy with BAD VIDEO

It's not that bad... I like the fade to dark, it's more realistic.

Originally posted by Tom:


I hate to contradict what people say, but don't take it in RAW! JPG small low quality is more than you'll ever need. Setting it to the "low" quality (vs. fine) will help remove the flicker due to anit-aliasing

Wow, thanks for that! I was shooting only in RAW for this one and as you can see even with controlled lighting it flickers. I was completely baffled as to what I had done wrong.

Originally posted by Simonjw:

Manual everything! Heres one of my efforts //www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAQKm3RZFNg
Very cool!
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