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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Color profile sRGB or Adobe RGB
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Showing posts 1 - 9 of 9, (reverse)
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07/29/2008 01:38:34 AM · #1
Hello everyone! I LOVE THIS WEBSITE! I am beginning to breath photography and that is all I think about (I know weird). I love going into this site for inspiration. Anyway if anyone can help me with a few questions would be great! I shoot with a 40D and don't shoot raw. What should I set my camera as sRGB or Adobe RGB. Today I changed the color profile on my camera and switched to sRGB and then took another shot with RGB and oh...by God what a difference! Also, checked with the 5d and adobe RGB looked better. I know that every model is different but I am not sure what to do. Should I swith to sRGB? I also use Photoshop CS3 and Lighroom. In lighroom, upon export it will ask me what color profile I want to use the images... so confusing! I use a Mac w/Photoshop is there a color profile that I should be defaulting to? So sorry if I sound so retarted...but this is stuff that I just can't seem to understand. I kinda understand the difference in profiles but as far as, my camera, lightroom, and PS3, I don't know how it should all be set up. I sure do hope that someone can help me with this because I want to cry...well, not really! I just want to pull my hair out. Thanks, sincerly, Desperate.
07/29/2008 06:13:40 AM · #2
I shoot in RGB simply because of the bigger color data. The sRGB is okay if you do not intend to print and only play it for the web. As a matter of fact, in processing for printing I only use Pro-RGB.
07/29/2008 06:40:31 AM · #3
It all depends, generally sRGB will suffice for most stuff. Just make sure you setup your colour profile in Photoshop so your working colourspace is sRGB as well or else you will get some weird colour shifts when importing in.

Adobe RGB has a wider colour space and generally what I tend to shoot in, but thats because I stick to a full colour managed workflow all the way through to print, so shooting and processing in AdobeRGB means I encounter no nasty (or expensive) surprises at print time. I also use a wide gamut monitor that allows me a bit more latitude when it comes to using a larger colour space.

But generally sRGB is probably the best way to go for now.

Message edited by author 2008-07-29 06:50:38.
07/29/2008 06:46:03 AM · #4
Originally posted by docpjv:

I shoot in RGB simply because of the bigger color data. The sRGB is okay if you do not intend to print and only play it for the web. As a matter of fact, in processing for printing I only use Pro-RGB.


sRGB is fine if you are not using colour managed printers - that is, if you are not using ICC profiles supplied by your printer then its best to assume they calibrate to the sRGB colour space. ProRGB is of course a better option due to the larger gamut, but for the majority of online printing shops they will probably print to sRGB as that is what Joe Public generally use with their P&S cameras. In fact, some of the cheaper online printers will automatically convert your images to sRGB, and if some of your colours fall out of the standard sRGB gamut, their software will shift those colours to the nearest match in the smaller gamut, which could cause a problem between what you was expecting your prints to look like and what they actually look like.

However, I am a relative newbie to the whole science of colour gamuts & profiles and I daresay there are a lot more knowledgable people here on the subject, but I think I have got the gist of how it all works.

Message edited by author 2008-07-29 06:50:49.
07/29/2008 08:18:08 AM · #5
If you are shooting JPEG, *and* you know color management, the wider gamut spaces like Adobe RGB and ProPhoto RGB are great. You will, however, gain much more from shooting RAW. You then have the choice, upon conversion to JPEG, of which color space to use. RAW files have no color space; since they consist of non-demosaiced data, they are not really even images yet.
07/29/2008 05:51:48 PM · #6
Thank you all! I appreciate all the feedback. I will soon have the nerve to enter on the challenges. Thanks again!
07/29/2008 09:08:40 PM · #7
If you plan on printing, shoot in aRGB to give you more flexibility... just remember to convert/export to sRGB before posting images online.

Just curious, why did you pay 300 bucks for Lightroom if you don't shoot RAW?
07/29/2008 09:45:47 PM · #8
Originally posted by option:

If you plan on printing, shoot in aRGB to give you more flexibility... just remember to convert/export to sRGB before posting images online.


Which brings the question to mind.... Which print places do use AdobeRGB or ProRGB?
07/30/2008 09:08:29 PM · #9
Originally posted by ambaker:

Originally posted by option:

If you plan on printing, shoot in aRGB to give you more flexibility... just remember to convert/export to sRGB before posting images online.


Which brings the question to mind.... Which print places do use AdobeRGB or ProRGB?


Who knows, you won't be printing with those profiles, typically. Using a larger gamut to begin with just gives you more flexibility when converting to the profile of the lab you use.
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