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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> how to make "Mirror floor"
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09/11/2008 01:03:13 AM · #1
What is using to make "Mirror floor"?
For example: ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/911/120/716616.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/911/120/716616.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

If there will be using simple glass mirror, between object and reflection will be space and/or visible two reflection.
How to make such nice reflection on "floor"?

sorry for my English ;)

Message edited by author 2008-09-11 01:05:41.
09/11/2008 01:18:08 AM · #2
I've tried to duplicate the effect ' . substr('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21_F.gif', strrpos('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21_F.gif', '/') + 1) . ' IreneM uses for her surfaces. I've managed to hit on the white surfaces, however the mirrored ones I can't come close to. I have no idea how she manages to clean her surface to such an amazing degree. My attempt was so horrible I almost knocked my camera over. I suppose someone could always ask her but I've never felt comfortable with asking people to share their "tricks", seems rude to me.
09/11/2008 01:30:20 AM · #3
Togtog, i hope that someone who know how to make "duplicate effect" will find this thread ;) And will share :)
09/11/2008 01:56:27 AM · #4
Two options:

1) A front-side mirror. This is a mirror that has the reflective surface sprayed on the FRONT of the glass not the BACK. This way there is no second reflection from the glass itself.
2) A simple reflective surface such as aluminum foil, dark plexiglass, etc.

One trick I've used before, but wouldn't work in a shot like this is a cookie pan with a black pillow case spread over it. Then about a 1/4 inch of water is put over the pillowcase. The black sucks up extraneous reflections while the water provides a decent reflective surface. I used that trick on these two pictures:

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/580/120/421498.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/580/120/421498.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/897/120/702956.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/897/120/702956.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

Message edited by author 2008-09-11 01:56:52.
09/11/2008 02:07:25 AM · #5
This was shot with a front sided mirror that I bought online a long time ago. I have no idea where you can find one now.
' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/35000-39999/37252/120/653879.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/35000-39999/37252/120/653879.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

edited to add a link to where you could order one:

front sided mirror

Message edited by author 2008-09-11 02:11:29.
09/11/2008 07:27:46 AM · #6
Thanks to all ;) now i will try to find where i can buy such mirror in Lithuania ;)
09/11/2008 08:06:26 AM · #7
Originally posted by DrAchoo:

Two options:

1) A front-side mirror. This is a mirror that has the reflective surface sprayed on the FRONT of the glass not the BACK. This way there is no second reflection from the glass itself.
2) A simple reflective surface such as aluminum foil, dark plexiglass, etc.

One trick I've used before, but wouldn't work in a shot like this is a cookie pan with a black pillow case spread over it. Then about a 1/4 inch of water is put over the pillowcase. The black sucks up extraneous reflections while the water provides a decent reflective surface. I used that trick on these two pictures:

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/580/120/421498.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/580/120/421498.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/897/120/702956.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/897/120/702956.jpg', '/') + 1) . '


Cool! Thanks for that, DrAchoo :-)
09/11/2008 08:13:14 AM · #8
ship world wide

Found this site guys ;-)
09/11/2008 09:28:54 AM · #9
Originally posted by DrAchoo:

Two options:

1) A front-side mirror. This is a mirror that has the reflective surface sprayed on the FRONT of the glass not the BACK. This way there is no second reflection from the glass itself.
2) A simple reflective surface such as aluminum foil, dark plexiglass, etc.

One trick I've used before, but wouldn't work in a shot like this is a cookie pan with a black pillow case spread over it. Then about a 1/4 inch of water is put over the pillowcase. The black sucks up extraneous reflections while the water provides a decent reflective surface. I used that trick on these two pictures:

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/580/120/421498.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/580/120/421498.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/897/120/702956.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/897/120/702956.jpg', '/') + 1) . '


I have to admit, there is something about reflections off of water, I just love em. It was prob reading your notes Doc that I tried just that with the cookie sheet and it worked quite well for me, even with abou 1/8" water in it...

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/65000-69999/67579/120/676350.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/65000-69999/67579/120/676350.jpg', '/') + 1) . '
09/11/2008 09:33:28 AM · #10
An odd choice, but if you have one, a black piano works very well as long as you use natural light. I've done several reflective shots on it and have no glare.
09/11/2008 09:38:54 AM · #11
Originally posted by DrAchoo:

Two options:

The black sucks up extraneous reflections while the water provides a decent reflective surface.


Just so you know, in the industry I represent, and my wife get's the paycheck from, this technique is called 'negative fill'.

Try Mylar as well as the other things people are mentioning in this thread.

In that same industry that I work in, we use this product for lighting and FX.

It is cheap-ish, doesn't break like glass, can be manipulated into corners, can maintain under high-ish heat, and is easily affixed to things.
09/11/2008 10:13:51 AM · #12
Also, you can get different shades of reflective car windshield stuff at the auto parts store. It's cheap. I found some that was static cling. You can stick it on a glass surface, peel it off when your done. You can get a rather large role of it for $15 and use a new piece every time. Lighting is a tad trickier, similar to a one way mirror.

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/80000-84999/83845/120/683329.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/80000-84999/83845/120/683329.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

Here's a crappy example of what it looks like used outdoors, but it gives you a good idea.

I still have most of my first roll left. I may have to break it back out again.
09/11/2008 11:01:18 AM · #13
I was thinking about how Irene gets all the dust out of her shoot/shot. So what's the trick Irene or anyone? I didn't submit my Shallow DOF shot just because of the dust I couldn't for the life of me get rid of. I tried air, dusting, electromagnetic dust removal pads, water, humidity. What works? Or is it all sensor dust that can legally be removed? hmm
09/11/2008 11:19:07 AM · #14
Originally posted by Jac:

I was thinking about how Irene gets all the dust out of her shoot/shot. So what's the trick Irene or anyone? I didn't submit my Shallow DOF shot just because of the dust I couldn't for the life of me get rid of. I tried air, dusting, electromagnetic dust removal pads, water, humidity. What works? Or is it all sensor dust that can legally be removed? hmm


All my reflective shots just use my dining room table. Dark, shiny wood. I swiffer it and then clone out what little dust remains (if allowed).

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/901/120/716331.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/901/120/716331.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

Message edited by author 2008-09-11 11:19:43.
09/11/2008 11:58:24 AM · #15
You can use noise>remove dust and scratches in PS in basic, can't you? I don't use it much except when restoring old photos, but it works remarkably.
09/11/2008 12:10:50 PM · #16
Originally posted by cynthiann:

You can use noise>remove dust and scratches in PS in basic, can't you? I don't use it much except when restoring old photos, but it works remarkably.


Yes but look at what it does to the rest of the details in the image. I use it but with selections, and we all know that's a no no in basic.

So, any other ideas on how to remove dust before clicking the shutter release button? Do these swiffer things repel dust from the cleaned surface too? Or do they just pick it up without leaving anything to help repel the dust?
09/11/2008 12:16:14 PM · #17
Originally posted by Jac:

So, any other ideas on how to remove dust before clicking the shutter release button? Do these swiffer things repel dust from the cleaned surface too? Or do they just pick it up without leaving anything to help repel the dust?


They grab all the dust, they don't just brush it around or onto the floor. Swiffers are probably alien technology recovered from Area 51 and just recently introduced to the marketplace.
09/11/2008 12:56:39 PM · #18
One of these special effects backgrounds from B&H should work. Other Backgrounds » Special Effects



09/13/2008 04:56:53 PM · #19
Would mirrored tiles work too?
09/13/2008 08:30:14 PM · #20
I was thinking of making my new studio floor a stained black concrete with extra varnish on it. I thought that might make for nice reflections. thoughts?
09/13/2008 08:37:03 PM · #21
pliexiglass painted with the mirror finish paint.........you can make it at any size
09/13/2008 08:43:52 PM · #22
Polished black granite?
09/13/2008 09:41:42 PM · #23
Originally posted by gwe21:

I was thinking of making my new studio floor a stained black concrete with extra varnish on it. I thought that might make for nice reflections. thoughts?


Hope you don't mind mopping...a lot.
09/13/2008 09:46:39 PM · #24
Originally posted by Man_Called_Horse:

Originally posted by gwe21:

I was thinking of making my new studio floor a stained black concrete with extra varnish on it. I thought that might make for nice reflections. thoughts?


Hope you don't mind mopping...a lot.


LOL. I thought of that. But stained concrete is the only real option I have right now cost wise (this is an addition to a house we are building) so I thought that would be the best for the time.
09/13/2008 10:52:07 PM · #25
Not sure if anyone has mentioned or thought of this.

Take a black sheet(satin,cotton,nylon)place it under a pane, plate, of glass and presto instant mirror.

thats what I used here

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/823/120/651813.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/823/120/651813.jpg', '/') + 1) . '' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/710/120/550564.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/710/120/550564.jpg', '/') + 1) . '' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/70000-74999/72670/120/613708.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/70000-74999/72670/120/613708.jpg', '/') + 1) . '
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