DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> General Discussion >> Last book you read and rating
Pages:   ...
Showing posts 251 - 275 of 356, (reverse)
AuthorThread
12/25/2010 10:28:21 PM · #251
Eric Berne - Games People Play: The Basic Handbook of Transactional Analysis
12/26/2010 12:32:18 PM · #252
The Passage by Justin Cronin. A very well-written epic horror novel, focusing on the human instead of romanticizing the vampires. My only complaint was a disappointing ending, which apparently leaves room for a sequel or two. If one is reading a the first book in a trilogy, one ought to be clued in beforehand, not left hanging after devoting time to 700+ pages!
12/26/2010 01:08:39 PM · #253
Swimsuit by James Patterson is the only novel I've read in one day - mainly because I was stuck at an airport with little else to do. It kept me entertained and I plan to buy his latest for my next trip!
12/26/2010 02:29:30 PM · #254
UR - by stephen king. a book about a kindle available only on kindle. 100 pgs but has all the great king elements. 5 of 5 stars.
12/26/2010 03:44:16 PM · #255
The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini. The Shack again before next year. Excellent experiences.
12/26/2010 04:02:15 PM · #256
Have almost finished THE TRUE MEMOIRS OF LITTLE K, by Adrienne Sharp. Historical fiction, about the ballerina sometime mistress of tsar Nicholas II and Niki himself, but mostly about the magnificent/obscene splendor of the court and the chaos of mismanagement.

historical fiction for ' . substr('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', strrpos('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', '/') + 1) . ' DrAchoo
12/26/2010 05:07:37 PM · #257
Originally posted by jmsetzler:

I picked up "The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" for Kindle for $9.99. I have never read these so I figured I would hit the first book before I dig into Atlas Shrugged...


All 5 in one volume... Wow! I didn't realize they'd done that. Cool beans!

R.
12/26/2010 05:24:27 PM · #258
I borrowed my daughter's new Nook and downloaded Helen of Troy by Margaret George. Sitting by the fire for a few stolen hours away from the family on Christmas afternoon really made for a perfect holiday resting time.
12/26/2010 05:40:16 PM · #259
Almost finished reading a book on the Klondike gold rush in the 1890s. Gold Diggers by Charlotte Gray. Unbelievable conditions that people lived and worked in, and many colourful personalities.
12/26/2010 10:40:05 PM · #260
Originally posted by citymars:

The Passage by Justin Cronin. A very well-written epic horror novel, focusing on the human instead of romanticizing the vampires. My only complaint was a disappointing ending, which apparently leaves room for a sequel or two. If one is reading a the first book in a trilogy, one ought to be clued in beforehand, not left hanging after devoting time to 700+ pages!


This book is definitely on my to-read list... I just haven't gotten around to it yet... hopefully soon...
12/26/2010 11:49:24 PM · #261
Constitutional Law of Canada by Peter W. Hogg... a truly in-depth analysis on the creation of Constitutional Law in Canada, and some truly interesting observation on jurisprudence. The price is a bit hefty, but great reading for anyone interested in Canadian law.

Ray

Message edited by author 2010-12-26 23:50:46.
01/05/2011 04:57:25 PM · #262
Am reading The Art of The LP, a nice thick hardcover book showing not only abum covers but also contains fascinating blurbs on the art direction, photographer/artist, the inspiration and of course the message the cover is trying to convey about the music.
01/05/2011 05:38:15 PM · #263
just finished "Safe Harbor" by Nicolas Sparks...good book...I'd give it an 8/9...his books are a little predictable after reading almost all of them..but as usual it had a good story line
01/05/2011 05:47:46 PM · #264
My Kobo has turned me into a reader again. I can't even list all the titles I've gone through since getting it, but here's a try:

Born Standing Up - Steve Martin: Autobiography of Martin's stand-up years. Great read.

Blockade Billy - Stephen King: Had some great potential, but was too short in the end. Felt rushed.

Sword of Shannara - Terry Brooks: Have been wanting to read this series for awhile now. Sadly, it's no Tolkien. Took me awhile to get through the first, but I'm committed now. Elfstones of Shannara is next.

Overtime - Charles Stross: This is a TOR Original short story. It was actually quite good, and a part of a larger universe that sounds inviting.

Currant Events - Piers Anthony: I don't know why, but I continue to read the Xanth novels. They are so damned sexist and immature and creepy, but I read them. lol.

Auralia's Colors - Jeffery Overstreet: An unusual fantasy novel. There's a sequel, which I'll have to get at some point. It was hard to get into at first, but once it got going, it was actually a very decent read.

Unseen Academicals - Terry Pratchett: The Discworld novels are some of my favorite of all time. So sad to hear about Pratchett's battle with early-onset Alzheimer's. Hopefully he has a few more Discwords in him.

That's about all I can remember for now. On the reading list are about 6 more books. I'm currently in the middle of The United States of Atlantis by Harry Turtledove. Historical fiction at its best, really. It's the second in the Atlantis series.

Message edited by author 2011-01-06 02:01:25.
01/05/2011 10:28:50 PM · #265
Originally posted by Qiki:

Just read Ender's Game (Orson Scott Card) for the first time. It was one of the books my son studied at school this year, so I grabbed it from him when he finished with it. Wonderful, thought provoking piece of classic science fiction.


It's a pretty good series overall, and I'd say it's worth your while. However, the Shadow offshoot series is pretty ehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh if you ask me.
01/05/2011 11:32:37 PM · #266
I picked up Card's latest volume of short fiction. A complete waste. As far as I'm concerned, he's a hack; he's lost it.

At the same time, I'm reading Joseph Boyden's collection, called Born With A Tooth, which is simply beautiful.

Two days ago, I read Emma Donaghue's Room. I read it within 48 hours. I still can't stop thinking about it. Without question, it's one of the most moving books I've read in many years. A beautiful, beautiful book.
01/06/2011 12:01:10 AM · #267
Just finished:

Marcy Dermansky's Bad Marie - something different

Marilynne Robinson's Gilead - beautifully written, by the author of Housekeeping

Abraham Verghese's Cutting for Stone - great breadth
01/06/2011 12:17:33 AM · #268
I finished The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown the other day. I was impressed. It might just be the best of his works to date.

I started Atlas Shrugged for a discussion group project yesterday. This one is gonna take me a while to dig through... I'll report back in 3 weeks or so... lol
01/07/2011 08:52:44 PM · #269
The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton 8 out of 10

The year is 1913 and a little girl arrives in Brisbane, Australia. Adopted by a dockmaster and his wife, the little girl doesn’t know her name, and the only clue to her identity is a book of fairy tales tucked inside a white suitcase. When the girl, called Nell, grows up, she begins to trace her identity but just when she is about to head to England,her grandaughter, Cassandra, is left in her care. Decades later when Nell dies, Cassandra finds herself the owner of a cottage in Cornwall and a mystery of Nell's origins. Loved the engaging storyline, the writing and the multigenerational story/mystery - I am usually good at spotting the ending long before but this one had me follow a red herring (glad it was 'not on the nose' for would have been disappointing)

Julie and Julia: My Year of Cooking Dangerously by Julie Powell 8 out of 10

If you loved the movie, you will love getting more of the story and the perils/adventures in cooking that Julie went through....btw, her blog is still up on the web to look at as well. Enjoyable quick read (2 days) and had me laughing to the point of tears in some spots.
01/07/2011 10:37:41 PM · #270
Originally posted by Louis:

I picked up Card's latest volume of short fiction. A complete waste. As far as I'm concerned, he's a hack; he's lost it.

At the same time, I'm reading Joseph Boyden's collection, called Born With A Tooth, which is simply beautiful.

Two days ago, I read Emma Donaghue's Room. I read it within 48 hours. I still can't stop thinking about it. Without question, it's one of the most moving books I've read in many years. A beautiful, beautiful book.

I read "Room" over the holiday break as well. I liked that it isn't neat and tidy. A good read - I also recommend it.
01/07/2011 11:52:47 PM · #271
Originally posted by jmsetzler:

I finished The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown the other day. I was impressed. It might just be the best of his works to date.

I started Atlas Shrugged for a discussion group project yesterday. This one is gonna take me a while to dig through... I'll report back in 3 weeks or so... lol


If you like this one, try The Fountainhead.

Just finished Grisham's The Confession. Well written and thoughtful. More intellectual than visceral.
01/24/2011 02:00:08 PM · #272
"under the dome" stephen king. good story good antagonists but after 1100 pages of well timed and paced writing, the last 10 pages felt like he wrapped it up too quickly. 7/10
01/24/2011 05:35:03 PM · #273
Yeah, in quick succession, I read "Under the Dome", "Lisey's Story", and "Full Dark, No Stars", in that order. Basically junk food for the brain. "Dome" wasn't any good, "Lisey" was okay, and "Stars", four novellas in one volume, was the best of the lot.

I'm enjoying King's maturity. He's a good storyteller. There's flashes of greatness in some of what he puts out, especially shorter pieces and short fiction. Seemingly by way of excuse, he says in "Stars" that his writing is the opposite of literary fiction. The latter, he says, is about extraordinary people in ordinary circumstances, whereas he writes about ordinary people in extraordinary circumstances. Interesting take, but I mostly wondered why he felt the need to excuse his career in the afterward to that book.

(Also, in "Lisey", his main character, a successful novelist, is described as given to reading high-brow books by literary writers, one of which is Margaret Atwood. Please.)
01/24/2011 05:59:14 PM · #274
'Say You're One of Them' by Uwem Akpan. A collection of stories told from the perspectives of children that take you on an intense and harrowing journey deep into Africa that highlight the frightful conditions of the troubled times in west Africa. Many tears we shed during this reading.

'The Road' by Cormac McCarthy. Certainly not as good as The Border Trilogy, but a well-written post-apocalyptic tale.
01/24/2011 06:29:50 PM · #275
Fatherland - Robert Harris
Crime fiction in an alternate history where Hitler won WWII. Really enjoyed this one. 9/10
Pages:   ...
Current Server Time: 07/06/2020 07:20:56 AM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2020 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 07/06/2020 07:20:56 AM EDT.