DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> General Discussion >> Last book you read and rating
Pages:   ...
Showing posts 26 - 50 of 356, (reverse)
AuthorThread
01/04/2009 10:57:57 PM · #26
Originally posted by thekfactor:

The logic of Life - Tim harford

The book uses rational economic theory and behavioral economics to explain the logic behind some of our everyday choices and decisions. The book is light in reading, and offers a great perspective into a lot of topics such as crime, office politics, poker, divorce rates etc. Definitely recommend.


If you like that one, you might also enjoy Freakonomics or the Tipping Point.
01/04/2009 11:55:36 PM · #27
Water For Elephants by Sara Gruen and it was wonderful! really, just a lovely, lovely story! :)
01/05/2009 12:23:24 AM · #28
Just finished Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows -- I read fast, read it in like 3-4 hours. Good book!!!

9/10, just because I wasn't quite satisfied with the ending. I was however immensely pleased with the quality of writing -- I was dreading much worse. It was really well-written!! I was surprised because OOTP and HBP were both...not as well-written as they could have been, and this one was just excellent.
01/05/2009 12:24:21 AM · #29
Originally posted by sher:

Water For Elephants by Sara Gruen and it was wonderful! really, just a lovely, lovely story! :)


I heard of this book, very recently, and wanted to read it. I don't remember where or why or what I heard about it though. Failure!
01/05/2009 12:25:47 AM · #30
The Dark Knight (movie tie-in)... 7/10. An ok read.

Before that

The Count of Monte Cristo... 9/10.
01/05/2009 12:31:43 AM · #31
Originally posted by L2:

Originally posted by thekfactor:

The logic of Life - Tim harford

The book uses rational economic theory and behavioral economics to explain the logic behind some of our everyday choices and decisions. The book is light in reading, and offers a great perspective into a lot of topics such as crime, office politics, poker, divorce rates etc. Definitely recommend.


If you like that one, you might also enjoy Freakonomics or the Tipping Point.


I have read Freakonomics. Infact, this author makes a lot of references to Levitt and Dubner's research. Another book I would recommend for a different view of the same topics - Butterfly Economics by Paul Ormerod.
01/05/2009 12:47:34 AM · #32
Eragon by Christopher Paolini

//www.alagaesia.com/

6/10

Not bad. I'm a fan of Fantasy. Picked this one up in the airport in Seattle. Entertaining, but not groundbreaking. I'm going to finish the series to see if it improves. He was 15 when he wrote Eragon, that itself is quite impressive.

01/05/2009 01:21:53 AM · #33
Breath by Tim Winton

10/10 Insight to Australian Beach/Surf culture in the 70s

I would recommend any of his books. One of Australias best writers.

Message edited by author 2009-01-05 01:24:44.
01/05/2009 02:19:46 AM · #34
It's really dangerous having a daughter who works in a bookstore. I've slowed down during December but at one point in the fall I read 10 books in 14 days.

The last was "Above Ground" by Don Easton, a local author, second in his Jack Taggert mystery series. Don was an undercover RCMP officer for 20+ years, though I'd never have guessed on meeting him. I'd have said accountant!

An excellent author who knows his subject intimately, Don doesn't pull any punches in describing the dark side of society. He says his books are about 50/50 between fiction and his experiences, and he raises questions such as how much wrongdoing do we allow in the name of the greater good? In this second novel his main character suffers serious doubts when his actions cause repercussions that he hadn't anticipated.

There is no black and white in these novels, and they cause one to explore one's own thoughts and feelings on the shades of grey.

I would highly recommend all three novels in print; Loose Ends, Above Ground, and Angel in the Full Moon. The fourth is at the publisher's and Don's working on the fifth.

eta; another recent read that I'd rate very highly is "The Book of Negroes" by Lawrence Hill.

Message edited by author 2009-01-05 22:49:20.
01/05/2009 03:17:41 PM · #35
Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte. There's a reason it's a classic. A very satisfying story. 10/10

Before that, The Zookeeper's Wife, by Diane Ackerman. The story of a family who uses their position as owners of the Warsaw Zoo to rescue Jews from the Nazis during WWII. 7/10. The parts of the book that are about the family are fascinating. The sections with background information about the war or the nazis bog down a bit.

edit: grammar


Message edited by author 2009-01-05 15:18:10.
01/05/2009 03:34:15 PM · #36
Originally posted by Ann:

Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte. There's a reason it's a classic. A very satisfying story. 10/10

Before that, The Zookeeper's Wife, by Diane Ackerman. The story of a family who uses their position as owners of the Warsaw Zoo to rescue Jews from the Nazis during WWII. 7/10. The parts of the book that are about the family are fascinating. The sections with background information about the war or the nazis bog down a bit.

edit: grammar


Jane Eyre is my go-to book when no other book will satisfy. I can't count the number of times I've read it and it's still wonderful! :)
01/05/2009 04:20:46 PM · #37
A Wrinkle In Time by Madeleine L'Engle -- Newberry Award winner (1963)

On a recent re-reading, I'd describe it as falling somewhere between The Never-Ending Story and 1984 for young readers ...
01/05/2009 04:22:07 PM · #38
A book? Whats that?

Kidding, I am in the middle of Atlas Shrugged for about the 6th time over a 20 years span since discovering it. Certainly a fave.
01/05/2009 04:30:03 PM · #39
"Annie Leibowitz at work"

really awesome piece of a photographer i greatly admire. with lots of photos and stories about her carreer and her work with the celebrities she has portrayed.
01/05/2009 04:30:50 PM · #40
"The Hour I First Believed" by Wally Lamb. Fiction, but real-world events form the framework, primarily the shootings at Columbine High School. Interesting bit - I really did not like the narrator/protagonist when I met him, and most probably will not. The book also has some wonderful "history", loosely tied to real history, in the form of diary entries and letters. It's a long read, and the trip isn't always smooth - quite rough at times, in fact - but a very worthwhile read as are his other two novels.
01/05/2009 04:36:45 PM · #41
In the past two weeks alone I have read 9 books. The two that have stuck with me more than the others are:

The Meaning of Night and The Glass of Time by Michael Cox. Both very excellent in every respect. Hard to rate on a scale of 1 to 10 as if I don't like a book I will just stop reading it. However, these would have to both be 10's in my opinion.

Just finished this afternoon The Memorist which is the follow up to The Reincarnationist both by MJ Rose. Very interesting reads. I would say 8/10 for both if not 9/10.

off now, after typing this edit, to start An Instance of the Fingerpost by Iain Pears which will be followed by Fingersmith by Sarah Waters

Message edited by author 2009-01-05 16:43:27.
01/05/2009 04:37:56 PM · #42
Originally posted by sher:

Water For Elephants by Sara Gruen and it was wonderful! really, just a lovely, lovely story! :)


I have read all her books but this one was the best of the three so far. Her next one should be out soon.
01/05/2009 05:00:29 PM · #43
Aztec, by Gary Jennings
Sex, and violence, are both graphic. I think for the most part it was necessary for the telling of this story and the timeline it encompasses, from the height of the Aztec nation threw the Spanish invasion and one mans journey in life. One of the top 5 that I have ever read.

01/05/2009 05:27:41 PM · #44
Originally posted by Melethia:

"The Hour I First Believed" by Wally Lamb. Fiction, but real-world events form the framework, primarily the shootings at Columbine High School. Interesting bit - I really did not like the narrator/protagonist when I met him, and most probably will not. The book also has some wonderful "history", loosely tied to real history, in the form of diary entries and letters. It's a long read, and the trip isn't always smooth - quite rough at times, in fact - but a very worthwhile read as are his other two novels.


I got that for Christmas but haven't started it yet. I read his other 2 years ago and enjoyed them.
01/05/2009 05:31:09 PM · #45
Originally posted by Tez:

The Innocent Man, John Grisham: 8/10

I'm not a usual reader of Grisham's stuff but this is his first non-fiction book. It's about a man wrongly convicted of murder and the laziness and sheer ignorance of police officers and their methods in USA and the methods they adopt to obtain a confession, even with zero evidence to provide a solid case but instead use shock tactics to beat the jury into a guilty verdict.

A good book that puts the police and the entire US CJS in very very unflattering light.


I couldn't finish that book, I found it very tedious. I've read almost everything Grisham has written and enjoyed almost all of them. I realize this is non-fiction and I've read several "true crime" books by Anne Rule that were far more interesting than this one.
01/05/2009 06:31:57 PM · #46
Originally posted by GeneralE:

A Wrinkle In Time by Madeleine L'Engle -- Newberry Award winner (1963)

On a recent re-reading, I'd describe it as falling somewhere between The Never-Ending Story and 1984 for young readers ...


My favourite book of the 6th grade and my daughter's as well. Hmmm, she's still got it, maybe it's time for a re-read :)
01/05/2009 07:00:05 PM · #47
I will also suggest The Stolen Child by Keith Donohue. I would give it 9/10. He is very descriptive but the book doesn't drag on forever. An excellent read.
01/05/2009 07:29:51 PM · #48
Originally posted by Ristyz:

A book? Whats that?

Kidding, I am in the middle of Atlas Shrugged for about the 6th time over a 20 years span since discovering it. Certainly a fave.


That book was good, but I could only make it through it once...I did like it tho. It was a struggle to read.
01/05/2009 09:15:41 PM · #49
Originally posted by GeneralE:

A Wrinkle In Time by Madeleine L'Engle -- Newberry Award winner (1963)

On a recent re-reading, I'd describe it as falling somewhere between The Never-Ending Story and 1984 for young readers ...


Along those same lines, I was captivated by Island of the Blue Dolphins, and especially the sequel, Zia. Then I read just about everything else by Scott O'Dell: The Seven Serpents Trilogy, The Hawk That Dare Not Hunt By Day, The Road to Damietta. I reread Damietta recently and really enjoyed it.
01/05/2009 10:23:02 PM · #50
An Atlas of Impossible Longing - Anuradha Roy

The Keep - Jennifer Egan

Both Good

Pages:   ...
Current Server Time: 05/30/2020 12:21:12 PM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2020 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 05/30/2020 12:21:12 PM EDT.