DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> General Discussion >> Last book you read and rating
Pages:   ...
Showing posts 101 - 125 of 356, (reverse)
AuthorThread
03/24/2009 12:04:23 PM · #101
Originally posted by Eisbaer:

Originally posted by JDubsgirl:

Originally posted by BeeCee:

Originally posted by K10DGuy:

I'm currently reading "The Life of Pi", and I have absolutely no idea why this book got such rave reviews.

I don't know that I'll even finish it.


I enjoyed it, for the most part, though I certainly wouldn't give it rave reviews.


i had to restart reading it like 3 times, but when i finally read it it was pretty good. seemed pretty long winded for the story content though


I completely agree with you!!! I'm an avid reader, and I just couldn't get into this one.


Funny, I'm totally not a math guy but this book held me from beginning to end. I read it in two sittings. Loved it.

Am currently re-reading "Black Swan", and finding it even more fascinating on second pass. I kind of rushed through it the first time, but was motivated to pull it out again by all the (ridiculous IMO) attempts to use it to debunk the idea of gaussian distributions in the scoring thread.

R.
03/24/2009 02:47:42 PM · #102
Um, 'The Life of Pi' has nothing to do with math. lol.
03/24/2009 02:56:13 PM · #103
Originally posted by K10DGuy:

Um, 'The Life of Pi' has nothing to do with math. lol.


I must be thinking of the wrong one, sorry: mine's a little non-fiction book, quite famous, about how the concept of the number Pi evolved LOL. Can anyone remind me what it is called?

R.
03/24/2009 02:58:15 PM · #104
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by K10DGuy:

Um, 'The Life of Pi' has nothing to do with math. lol.


I must be thinking of the wrong one, sorry: mine's a little non-fiction book, quite famous, about how the concept of the number Pi evolved LOL. Can anyone remind me what it is called?

R.


Ahh, I know that one, but the title slips me right now.

*EDIT* The Joy of Pi?

Message edited by author 2009-03-24 14:59:04.
03/24/2009 03:45:57 PM · #105
Bear, The Black Swan was NOT used to debunk the idea of Gaussian distributions, but to throw some perspective on the discussion in general. What is ridiculous IMNSHO is trying to decide what form of distribution is appropriate for a bunch of statistical experts trying to dance on the head of a pin.
03/24/2009 03:49:20 PM · #106
Originally posted by K10DGuy:

The Joy of Pi?


Dat be de one, yup! Loved it!

R.
03/24/2009 03:52:29 PM · #107
Originally posted by K10DGuy:

Um, 'The Life of Pi' has nothing to do with math. lol.


Well, there must be some math symbolised somewhere in a story about a man and a tiger in a lifeboat, I just don't know where or how...
03/24/2009 03:55:10 PM · #108
Originally posted by tnun:

Bear, The Black Swan was NOT used to debunk the idea of Gaussian distributions, but to throw some perspective on the discussion in general. What is ridiculous IMNSHO is trying to decide what form of distribution is appropriate for a bunch of statistical experts trying to dance on the head of a pin.


Well, not exactly: it was pointed out that Black Swan showed the fallacy of... yada yada, and it didn't seem to me to apply to what was being discussed. And I still fail to see how Kirbic's observation (born of actual study of the results) that in virtually all cases individual-image vote distributions match the gaussian model constitutes a statistical expert dancing on the head of a pin, but that has nothing to do with this thread so ignore my ramblings :-)

R.
03/24/2009 03:59:03 PM · #109
In the midst of reading "The Gargoyle". Its a great read on so many levels. The story is about a burn victim's recovery and how he discovers love. (And no. Its not a mushy love story either.)

I'd also give kudos to the Watchmen graphic novel. Rated as one of the NY times top 100 novels since 1927, its actually a pretty engaging read. Definitely not your typical comic book.
03/24/2009 09:57:39 PM · #110
My apologies: that was a ridiculous head of the pin statement of mine - it doesn't even make sense. I just think that statistical analysis of whatever kind, however valid and useful, is way too often used as a substitute for common sense, thought, and judgement. And this is the point of The Black Swan.

Back to normal programming: just finished James Kelman's 'Kieron Smith, boy'. Strange in a way: repetitive stream of consciousness style, but in the end you have been inside the heart and soul of a boy aged 10-13 growing up in Glasgow. And anyone who grew up with an older brother may relate to Kieron.

Message edited by author 2009-03-24 22:00:39.
04/01/2009 12:57:36 PM · #111
"Run"
It's a truly moving story eloquently written by Ann Patchett.
04/01/2009 01:32:02 PM · #112
I recently decided to put some structure in what I read. I went to the NY Times Best Novels of the 20th Century. I am reading from the bottom up but only those novels published the year I was born and later. If I finish those I will fill in with the others. And if still alive I will move on to the NY Times Best Non-Fiction of the 20th Century. I just finished Under the Net by Iris Murdoch. I enjoyed it would give it a 6 out of 10.
04/05/2009 08:54:34 PM · #113
Just finished Why evolution is true by Jerry Coyne. Loved it!
04/05/2009 09:20:08 PM · #114
I am currently reading Shannon by Frank Delaney, and am finding it to be a very enjoyable read. The story itself is interesting and it is an easy read - perfect for settling reading right before sleep.
06/04/2009 02:05:39 PM · #115
Just finished reading "the secret life of bees"...very good read.
06/04/2009 02:28:53 PM · #116
I just finished reading "A Rumor of War" by Philip Caputo. It is a memoir of a soldier in the Vietnam War. I thoroughly enjoyed its gruesome details and constant moral and ethical introspection. If you're not familiar with military terms, it might get a bit confusing at times, but I think the heart of the book is very accessible to the average reader. I felt like I was standing right beside him living the war through a soldiers eyes.

It might have struck an extra chord with me because my dad was in the Marine Corps during that era as well. But all in all, it was a great read, and I definitely recommend it if you haven't checked it out.
10/16/2009 06:23:21 AM · #117
The Little Stranger - Sarah Waters

Reminded me of Henry James' The Turn of the Screw.
I loved the unhurried pace and unfolding of the characters. Great atmosphere and thoroughly chilling.

Tried to read The Time Travelers Wife, but handed it on.
Just didn't grab me and then it began to annoy me.


Message edited by author 2009-10-16 06:31:06.
10/16/2009 07:00:54 AM · #118
Patriot games by Tom Clancy.
The movie put me to sleep, the book kept me up way too late. 10/10
10/16/2009 07:55:54 AM · #119
"We the Living" by Ayn Rand.

I was just curious as to what we in America have to look forward to as we rush headlong into socialism.

Rated it 6/10, I don't think it is as good as Atlas Shrugged.

Message edited by author 2009-10-16 07:57:44.
10/16/2009 07:55:59 AM · #120
Originally posted by datcat:

The Little Stranger - Sarah Waters


Excellent book! I like SW's books. I would give this one 10/10.
10/16/2009 08:27:27 AM · #121
my last is:

World Without End

The cathedral and the priory are again at the centre of a web of love and hate, greed and pride, ambition and revenge. But at the heart of the story is the greatest natural disaster ever to strike the human race: the plague known as the Black Death, which killed something like half the population of Europe in the fourteenth century.

another Ken Follett's beautiful work... i recommend it strongly

Message edited by author 2009-10-16 08:27:47.
10/16/2009 10:59:53 PM · #122


World Without End

The cathedral and the priory are again at the centre of a web of love and hate, greed and pride, ambition and revenge. But at the heart of the story is the greatest natural disaster ever to strike the human race: the plague known as the Black Death, which killed something like half the population of Europe in the fourteenth century.

another Ken Follett's beautiful work... i recommend it strongly [/quote]

Haven't read it yet, but its on my shelf waiting. Its forerunner Pillars of the Earth is wonderful.
10/22/2009 03:45:12 PM · #123
"The Story of Edgar Sawtelle" - David Wroblewski

I don't know what I'd rate it. A great read until the end. Then it sucked. In my opinion, it fell apart, losing a lot of the magic the book had created until that point. But that could just be me.
10/22/2009 04:04:58 PM · #124
The Lost Symbol- Dan Brown

10/10, the freemasons helped him write it and the book was such a treat.
10/22/2009 04:23:58 PM · #125
Originally posted by RulerZigzag:

The Lost Symbol- Dan Brown

I thought so. Your mention of "noetic science" in another thread gave you away. ;)

My last was Hunting Eichmann by Neil Bascomb. It's a non-fiction book of popular history about the capture, trial, and execution of Adolf Eichmann by the Israelis. Very interesting, with new information not published before.
Pages:   ...
Current Server Time: 05/28/2020 07:11:48 PM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2020 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 05/28/2020 07:11:48 PM EDT.