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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> Astrophotography help
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Showing posts 1 - 10 of 10, (reverse)
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01/10/2009 06:13:47 AM · #1
I can't edit these pictures for the life of me. Here is a before and after shoot. (Yes I know my before picture was crap to begin with) but i am just trying to get the hang of it so when I have a nice night and actually drive out to somewhere with less light pollution i will be ready to actually take good pictures. anyone got any tips for me?

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01/10/2009 09:41:40 AM · #2
I'm not sure what settings you used but this looks overexposed. You can't really do too much in Photoshopp to fix that. As has been mentioned in other threads about this subject, you will need to experiment with your settings to see what gives you your best exposure. The longer your exposure, the lower ISO you should use. Even with my camera (Canon 40D) if I use an ISO over 400 for 30 seconds I'll get unwanted noise. If you get some images that look dark to you, go to PS and adjust the high end of your levels adjustment and see if that brings up the stars for you.
01/10/2009 10:32:48 AM · #3
Some camera settings would be helpful - what were they for the photo you took? There's no hard and fast rule for taking astrophotos, the settings vary depending on a lot of factors, but at least we'd have a starting point.

Somewhere I was just reading said that ISO 400, f/5.6, and 5 minutes of exposure is a good starting point if you're looking to capture some trailing on a standard lens (about 35mm).

I've heard a variety of ways that different people do astro work; some like wide open f/2.8, others stop down. Some swear by the lowest ISO possible, others insist that a higher ISO used for a shorter time is best. Depending on your lens' focal length and whether you want streaks or pin-point stars dictates the shutter speed.

Me, I start somewhere in the middle and finesse it to where I want it - not very scientific, but then again, the whole process is really trial-and-error dependent.
01/10/2009 11:37:07 AM · #4
An Astrophotography Primer is in our Tutorials section (under the Learn menu).
01/10/2009 12:22:05 PM · #5
Before we give advice about how to fix that photo, tell us, in detail, how your shot was made: Camera settings, exposure, tripod or moving mount, location, etc. Don't skimp on the details, it's all important. And yes, read my how to on this site.
01/10/2009 12:25:25 PM · #6
Still looks like there's quite a bit of light pollution.

Message edited by author 2009-01-10 12:26:04.
01/10/2009 12:31:25 PM · #7
The ones that you posted look like they may have been shot using florescent white balance. Try "tungsten" white balance if you want the sky to be a nice blue like this shot.
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This shot below was done with a 15mm fisheye. You don't need a long tele lens to do astrophotography if you want to include some earth for reference and to add interest. There is a handy link to see if the space station is coming over your area in the description with this shot.
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01/10/2009 05:00:02 PM · #8
Originally posted by scooter97:

I'm not sure what settings you used but this looks overexposed. You can't really do too much in Photoshopp to fix that. As has been mentioned in other threads about this subject, you will need to experiment with your settings to see what gives you your best exposure. The longer your exposure, the lower ISO you should use. Even with my camera (Canon 40D) if I use an ISO over 400 for 30 seconds I'll get unwanted noise. If you get some images that look dark to you, go to PS and adjust the high end of your levels adjustment and see if that brings up the stars for you.


I was doing about 30 seconds... I think my ISO may have been to high. I will have to try it out on a lower ISO setting and see if it comes out better. (and yes I know it was over exposed but I was freezing my butt of so I decided to call it quits when I wasn't getting it right.) I just wanted to see if I could edit it at all or not.
01/10/2009 05:23:32 PM · #9
Originally posted by LanndonKane:

Still looks like there's quite a bit of light pollution.


Yes there was. This was just shot in my back yard. It was when I first got my Canon Rebel XT. So I was testing it out. But I will try to go back and edit it with tungsten. I just left it on As shot I think... or Auto I don't remember now.
01/11/2009 10:45:20 AM · #10
Landon,

I don't know a lot about astrophotography, but have dabbled a little with it. I would check google with something like "350D Rebel astrophotography". I took this shot with a Nikon D50, Manual settings: F/8.0, WB auto, ISO 200. I set the shutter in bulb mode, then used an infrared remote to trigger the shutter. I let the shutter stay open almost 30 minutes. The lens I used was the Tokina 12-24mm wide angle.

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Regards,
Stephen
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