DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Looking for a decent Graduated filter set.
Pages:  
Showing posts 1 - 10 of 10, (reverse)
AuthorThread
06/23/2009 12:09:52 AM · #1
I was able to borrow a graduated filter set from a photographer for a few minutes the other day and was blown away at how nice everything came out. Now I want a set!!
My questions are this
1. I have about $200.00 What should I look for in a "kit"?
2.What is the difference in hard graduations medium and soft?
3. What is a good starter filter set for mostly landscape photography?

I have a D700 with a 24-70 2.8 lens. Bad Ass Glass if I say so my self!
77 mm filter ring too.

There were so many choices on BandH and Adorama.com that I had to ask the community 1st.

Many thanks in advance.
06/23/2009 01:03:46 AM · #2
I've got a small selection of filters mentioned in this thread.

If you're in the States maybe we could do some business. All you'd need is the 77mm adapter ring to replace the 67 in my kit. I think they sell for 3 or 4 dollars at B&H.

Edit.
To answer your middle question the differences is the transition between the dark portion of the glass to the light portion. The harder the easier to see the line. So if you're shooing a treeline a soft transition might work better than a hard one.
Least ways that's the way I understand it.

Message edited by author 2009-06-23 01:06:33.
06/23/2009 09:30:36 AM · #3
I would go for the cokin system. A few advantages: the square ones can be moved around, you can buy adapters for all your lenses instead of either buying filters for each lens or step down/up rings (and step up rings aren't a good idea anyway), you can easily stack them, and you can hand-hold them up to your lenses rather than having to screw them on every time.

Everything you wanted to know about cokin filters.

Filters are much better than post editing to get desired effects...
06/23/2009 09:55:12 AM · #4
I have read that the P series may not be wide enough for a 24 mm lens. Is this true? If not, then I am definitely interested!
Edit: The D700 is a FX Sensor meaning that I use the whole lens. No Crop factor.

Message edited by author 2009-06-23 09:58:53.
06/23/2009 10:15:21 AM · #5
Originally posted by dahkota:

I would go for the cokin system. A few advantages: the square ones can be moved around, you can buy adapters for all your lenses instead of either buying filters for each lens or step down/up rings (and step up rings aren't a good idea anyway), you can easily stack them, and you can hand-hold them up to your lenses rather than having to screw them on every time.

Everything you wanted to know about cokin filters.

Filters are much better than post editing to get desired effects...


I've got a Galen Rowell Singh-ray filter for my Cokin holder. ( //www.singh-ray.com/grndgrads.html ). Its my most expensive filter but it works well for landscapes especially where the horizon isn't even. (hills and mountains etc). A hard filter works nicely where you have a definite horizon (e.g. open prairies, seascapes )but where I live that's rarely the case.

eta: I forget which series of Cokin holder I have. I'll have to look it up.

Message edited by author 2009-06-23 10:16:16.
06/23/2009 10:34:51 AM · #6
I have a Cokin filter set for my cropped sensor camera (Canon 40D) and have never had a problem with the filter being too small. This system has worked well for me and is much less expensive than buying individual screw on filters.
06/25/2009 01:47:26 AM · #7
Originally posted by rlewis:

I have a Cokin filter set for my cropped sensor camera (Canon 40D) and have never had a problem with the filter being too small. This system has worked well for me and is much less expensive than buying individual screw on filters.


Thanks for the tip.
06/25/2009 04:17:40 AM · #8
On my Tokina 12-24 I get a vignette at 12 and a little up with the cokin p. Canon 30D
06/25/2009 08:21:58 AM · #9
I wouldn't think your sensor size would prevent you from using a Cokin filter. The issue is covering the lens fully and all 77mm lenses are covered with the P series filters.

The vignetting with wide angle (more than 14mm) lenses happens when you use the Cokin filter holder. When I use my Sigma 10-20 at the widest end I just remove the holder and hand hold the filter.
06/25/2009 04:14:09 PM · #10
Your right it is the filter holder and not the filter that vignettes. I even have a filter that is cut down to only one slot and still.
Pages:  
Current Server Time: 07/02/2020 01:40:15 AM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2020 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 07/02/2020 01:40:15 AM EDT.