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10/13/2009 11:21:19 PM · #1
How apparent is noise in print?

For example when I sharpen some photos to be printed, I can see some minimal noise due to sharpening. How apparent is that on print?
Thanks
Jaime
10/13/2009 11:28:24 PM · #2
In my experience, more prominent in print than on screen :-(

R.
10/13/2009 11:37:44 PM · #3
My experience has shown that you can't really answer this question without specifying what size you're printing at. For smaller prints noise won't be very noticeable at all* but it gets glaring in a hurry.
*unless you cropped a lot.
10/13/2009 11:39:49 PM · #4
lets say 20x30 and 16x24 sizes
The photos themselves are pretty clean, but as I sharpen them, noise does appear in some places. I just wondering if I am oversharpening. They look good at full pizel sizes as far as shaprness, but I just can notice a little noise.

Message edited by author 2009-10-13 23:41:01.
10/13/2009 11:41:26 PM · #5
You can also use the 'Print Size' feature on photoshop to check how the print will look given that you calibrate your monitor resolution and the use the correct DPI for your print size. CS4 does have a good 'print size' preview. Previous versions of photoshop weren't that great.
10/13/2009 11:49:19 PM · #6
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

In my experience, more prominent in print than on screen :-(

R.


Si, agreed, distinctly ugly, especially in print. If the image is worth it, you can tried to hide it by adding grain.

Photoshop, in my view, is not very good at this. PS grain appears too uniformly overlayed to make for any credible and pleasing aesthetic, unless you manage to obscure the underlying noise with the subtlest of a gauze, i.e. soft grain at a low intensity and contrast. There is better software out there for noise reduction in the first place and also for a more organic grain composition that considers the tonalities of each individual image it is applied to.
10/14/2009 12:05:41 AM · #7
Originally posted by JaimeVinas:

lets say 20x30 and 16x24 sizes
The photos themselves are pretty clean, but as I sharpen them, noise does appear in some places. I just wondering if I am oversharpening. They look good at full pizel sizes as far as shaprness, but I just can notice a little noise.


It depends on the image. Each photo has its own aesthetic demands. One will be more forgiving than another. If you have a great reportage series, I'd almost expect to see the sensation obscured by something, noise, grain, flying debris...
If it's a very composed image, like a formal portrait with studio lighting or a landscape studied and composed over a period of time, no, we'll likely not go so easily. After all, there are plenty of perfectly "clean" images competing with it.

I frequently print sizes from 11.25 x 20 to 16 x 20. I cannot tolerate any unwarranted noise at these sizes. An 8 x 10 might be slightly more forgiving, and only if the original was large enough to go, say 16 x 20, if this makes any sense.
10/14/2009 12:20:12 AM · #8
how about subtle noise created from OOF space?
As I sharpened some of these I have noticed that the OOF areas seems to show more noise
10/14/2009 12:24:05 AM · #9
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

In my experience, more prominent in print than on screen :-(

R.


Totally opposite in my experience. My LCD's show allot more noise in my photos then even the largest of prints I've made. I've printed 3200ISO prints at 20x30 and 6400 at 10x15 both with decent crops. And the noise is not near as noticeable on the print as it is in the file on my LCD.

Matt
10/14/2009 12:31:22 AM · #10
Originally posted by JaimeVinas:

how about subtle noise created from OOF space?
As I sharpened some of these I have noticed that the OOF areas seems to show more noise


This image (below) has noise that's concentrated in the out-of-focus areas of the image. I don't mind this here, as it serves a good purpose which is to emphasize the crisp focal points, which is, IMO, what makes the shot what it is in the first place.

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/5000-9999/7778/120/701251.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/5000-9999/7778/120/701251.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

I think you would do well to consider each effect or flaw, if you like, only in relation to the whole of the image.

Message edited by author 2009-10-14 00:31:47.
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